Is "Deafie" a Deaf-Only Word?

VamPyroX

bloody phreak from hell
A hearing friend asked me this question and I didn't know how to answer it.

The question is...

Is the word "Deafie" a sacred word that can only be said by Deaf people? What exactly does that word mean?

I've heard from a couple deaf people that hearing people are NOT allowed to use the word "deafie" cuz it's considered a serious insult.

So, what's your say on this?

From my experience, I've never seen or heard a hearing person use this word. It's either because they've never heard or thought of the word... or because they were afraid to say it. :dunno:
 

Babyblue

New Member
:hmm:

The only hearing person I heard use this word was a long time ago in high school was a teacher at the deaf school.
I never considered it as an insult.

I guess it would depend on how the word is used.
 

JClarke

AD Veteran
Premium Member
I use that word but with the 's' along in the end -- 'Deafies' which I refer to a group of deaf people.
 

Chevy57

Sherlock Hound
Premium Member
"deafie" defines cultural term that deaf people use to refer to themselves.
"hearie" defines cultural term that deaf people use to refer to hearing people.
 

Jolie77

New Member
Premium Member
Wow, That is a very good question.

I'm not sure how other people would view it this way. I don't think it is exactly a sacred word among the Deaf People. I don't consider it as an insult if a hearing person were to use this term "deafies" that is. To some, it may be considered as an insult.

Let's look at it this way - For instance, You often hear/see Blacks use this term "N****" among each other (with that, when they use it among each other, it isn't an insult) but when it comes to other races using this term, it is considered as an insult. (Correct me if I'm wrong on this - Just trying to use this as an example). Perhaps, Shel90 can clear this one out? :)

I think it also applies to how each group refers and/or calls each other by the given name. It is more like an "inside" thing among the group. Well, maybe it is but not exactly. I hope I'm making sense.

Also, I wanted to note that it is not exactly a cultural term. A cultural term is what defines a group but as to use a word that defines a cultural term, that is not what it is, IMO.

I have also seen some hearing people use that term. Most of the time, it would be hearing people who are 'terps or someone who is familiar with the deaf culture.
 

society's_child

New Member
I've used the term "Deafies" here on several occasions.. i don't recall any deaf people calling me out on it. If they did, I would most assuredly refrain from using it.
 

web730

New Member
"deafie" defines cultural term that deaf people use to refer to themselves.
"hearie" defines cultural term that deaf people use to refer to hearing people.

deafie xxxx deafies - rather deafies that we often refer to... rarely heard a 'deafie' word (single) before

deafies = deaf people

hearies = hearing people

It's not an insulting word, really. I never heard that it's so either. Just that it's a "lazy way" to say deafies instead of deaf people... pretty much like an abbreviation is all.

I don't understand if someone finds it rather insulting. It has been used for years (how long?).. but for a quite long time.
 

Chevy57

Sherlock Hound
Premium Member
deafie xxxx deafies - rather deafies that we often refer to... rarely heard a 'deafie' word (single) before

deafies = deaf people

hearies = hearing people

It's not an insulting word, really. I never heard that it's so either. Just that it's a "lazy way" to say deafies instead of deaf people... pretty much like an abbreviation is all.

I don't understand if someone finds it rather insulting. It has been used for years (how long?).. but for a quite long time.

About "lazy way" . ADer(s) may be "lazy way" instead of AllDeaf member(s) :lol:
 

Hear Again

New Member
this reminds me of what people in the blind community call sighted people -- sighties. it's not meant to be an insult, it's only a reference. some blind people also call themselves blindies or blinks which is identical to the way deaf and hoh use the term deafies to describe themselves. similarly, people with bipolar disorder call themselves beepers while people with schizophrenia call themselves schizos.
 

Chevy57

Sherlock Hound
Premium Member
this reminds me of what people in the blind community call sighted people -- sighties. it's not meant to be an insult, it's only a reference. some blind people also call themselves blindies or blinks which is similar to the way deaf and hoh use the term deafies to describe themselves.

what term is deafblind person? deafsighies? deafblindies? not good word term?
 

hohDougRN

New Member
:nono:
Wow, That is a very good question.

I'm not sure how other people would view it this way. I don't think it is exactly a sacred word among the Deaf People. I don't consider it as an insult if a hearing person were to use this term "deafies" that is. To some, it may be considered as an insult.

Let's look at it this way - For instance, You often hear/see Blacks use this term "N****" among each other (with that, when they use it among each other, it isn't an insult) but when it comes to other races using this term, it is considered as an insult. (Correct me if I'm wrong on this - Just trying to use this as an example). Perhaps, Shel90 can clear this one out? :)

I think it also applies to how each group refers and/or calls each other by the given name. It is more like an "inside" thing among the group. Well, maybe it is but not exactly. I hope I'm making sense.

Also, I wanted to note that it is not exactly a cultural term. A cultural term is what defines a group but as to use a word that defines a cultural term, that is not what it is, IMO.

I have also seen some hearing people use that term. Most of the time, it would be hearing people who are 'terps or someone who is familiar with the deaf culture.

That was the first analogy I thought of Jo. I would have been like hearie? deafie? what do you mean? I understand now that it is mainly d/hoh jargon that seem to be norm (thats pretty much all I call hearing and deafies now....U dudes rubbed off on me :) ) Its a situational and contextual thing that I'd say people use in different situations. I just feel IMO its just a cultural thing with deafies. It could be spitefull, condescending, or just normally accepted culteral jargon which develops in "closed off" environments. IE....Jargon and stuff at hospital we talk like it is nothing, but out of the hospital, no no, :nono: it is Taboo. Did I just make an easy answer complicated? oops
 

Gobae

Member
Our first ASL teacher (a CODA) indicated although we might see Deaf people refer to each other as "deafies" it was very rude for hearing people to do so.

She explained this was a common derogatory term in use by hearing people from the late 1880's through the mid 1960's.

Apparently, as the older generation that remember this dies off (and hearing people have refrained from using it) this is becoming much less of and issue.
 

Grummer

Active Member
Interesting post you made Gobae, yeah, but it social meanings connecting with words changes of over time, like word "gay'meant happy it was used widely in the 1940's -1960's then at some point1980's it changed , along with the politicalisation of homosexual/lesbian rights - they took the power and charged the word to reflect their world. I suspect the samething has been happening for deaf people, only 'offically they used the capital "D", but somehow a lazier, more conversional terms somehow sprung up...so Deafie became that slang.
Its a slang which can hold many meanings dependings on the context but overall its a great word, it removes the stigma away from deaf people while it adds the happier connotions describing deaf people as social beings with feelings. Kudos to Baja, I agree, lets start spreading it to the hearing 'world'/community.....and for a while they will be confused but over time, they'd appreciate us even better. We would get to be treated better as we have became to be another colour in society not some stains to be removed.
 

AlleyCat

Well-Known Member
There was actually a thread about this before. About "deafies" and "hearies". I personally don't like either term. I would like to be known as a deaf person, not a "deafie" just because it's convenient to shorten the name. There's something about it I don't like. But that's just my opinion. I do have to say I agree with the way black people can call themselves "nig***" among themselves and have it be okay whereas a white person calling a black person a "nig*** is not okay. I am the same about the "deafies" term - I would not like to be called a "deafie" by a hearing person. Likewise - I will never call a hearing person a "hearie." I'm not 100% certain why I feel that way, but I do. It feels degradatory for some reason. Like we are not worthy enough of being called "deaf" or a "deaf person". I have not seen the term used here in my area at all so that could be part of it as well.
 

Grummer

Active Member
There was actually a thread about this before. About "deafies" and "hearies". I personally don't like either term. I would like to be known as a deaf person, not a "deafie" just because it's convenient to shorten the name. There's something about it I don't like. But that's just my opinion. I do have to say I agree with the way black people can call themselves "nig***" among themselves and have it be okay whereas a white person calling a black person a "nig*** is not okay. I am the same about the "deafies" term - I would not like to be called a "deafie" by a hearing person. Likewise - I will never call a hearing person a "hearie." I'm not 100% certain why I feel that way, but I do. It feels degradatory for some reason. Like we are not worthy enough of being called "deaf" or a "deaf person". I have not seen the term used here in my area at all so that could be part of it as well.

hmm ok ,
also it seems however petty these politically charged words might be, it can-not please everyone. This is knid of typical when pro-nouns are invented, it nearly always incite a kind of conflict.,Hever when i begin to second guess this, it began from a conflict right from the beginning.

Alleycat, you got me thinking...
 
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