Yesterday at the post office ...

Silentwolfdog

New Member
Does anyone else see the irony in this? Let's think about it for a minute. Who is this sign for? It's for blind people that aren't going to see it because they're blind. It's almost as bad as the books on the problem of illiteracy in our school library. Like the illiterate kid is gonna pick it up and read it. :roll:

Wow...I haven't thought about that! Hope they also have braille sign for blind people.
 

Rollover

Member
Does anyone else see the irony in this? Let's think about it for a minute. Who is this sign for? It's for blind people that aren't going to see it because they're blind. It's almost as bad as the books on the problem of illiteracy in our school library. Like the illiterate kid is gonna pick it up and read it. :roll:

I laughed when I read this posting! Good point! This sign comes from the government as a standard sign. There is something wrong in this picture!

I believe the blind service dog should go to the post office because how can
the blind person find the door or step without the dog? The dog guides the way, right?
 

VamPyroX

bloody phreak from hell
Does anyone else see the irony in this? Let's think about it for a minute. Who is this sign for? It's for blind people that aren't going to see it because they're blind. It's almost as bad as the books on the problem of illiteracy in our school library. Like the illiterate kid is gonna pick it up and read it. :roll:
Actually, it does make sense.

Since seeing eye dogs are the only ones allowed, then there's no need for a blind person to read the sign because it doesn't apply to them. :)
 

morbid-mongoose

New Member
Actually, it does make sense.

Since seeing eye dogs are the only ones allowed, then there's no need for a blind person to read the sign because it doesn't apply to them. :)

I know. It's just the concept of a written sign intended for blind people that gets me. You think they'd have it better worded. :giggle:
 

jillio

New Member
Exactly
VamPyroX,

The biggest problem I have is that people do everything and anything to either distract the dog or want to pet it . . . all the time! If I say 'no,' I get a funny look by people. If I say 'yes,' I get the 50 questions . . . questions that some are actually none of their business for asking. If we, with hearing dogs, say that, people give us hassle. Security is called, the police is called . . . the whole nine yards. Touching my dog, especially without permission, is equivalent to molesting me. NO, YOU CANNOT PET MY DOG!

I've also seen people distract my dog to the point that I had to tell the people, "I am NOT responsible for dog bites!" You would not believe what some people do and I view them as nothing more than a lawsuit waiting to happen. If and when I say something, I get the "fuck you" look from them. I'm generally pretty nice about allowing people pet Snickers, but I am also seeing people who pet her without asking me, especially when she has her blaze orange cape on. I get the gawks and stares, as well as the rude questions to boot.

EXACTLY! I have a blind student who uses a service dog, andthe problem with other students wanting to come up and pet Freddy and play with him got so bad that the first day of any class this student had, the professor was required to make it clear that this was a working service dog, not a pet, that Freddie was trained to respond to Matt and no one else, and treating him as a pet was not acceptable because it could put Matt in danger by confusing the dog and making him unable to perform his job. And you know what got me--people would see the student in the ahllway, or outside on campus, and would say' "Hi, Freddie" to the dog, but never bother to say "Hi, Matt" to the blind student! How rude can you get? Does disability make peole so nervous that they are comfortable interacting with the animal, but not the person?!!
 

Silentwolfdog

New Member
Exactly

EXACTLY! I have a blind student who uses a service dog, andthe problem with other students wanting to come up and pet Freddy and play with him got so bad that the first day of any class this student had, the professor was required to make it clear that this was a working service dog, not a pet, that Freddie was trained to respond to Matt and no one else, and treating him as a pet was not acceptable because it could put Matt in danger by confusing the dog and making him unable to perform his job. And you know what got me--people would see the student in the ahllway, or outside on campus, and would say' "Hi, Freddie" to the dog, but never bother to say "Hi, Matt" to the blind student! How rude can you get? Does disability make peole so nervous that they are comfortable interacting with the animal, but not the person?!!

How awful...It's like he doesn't exists at all.
 

Aleser

New Member
I believe the blind service dog should go to the post office because how can
the blind person find the door or step without the dog? The dog guides the way, right?

..
no.
No.
and NO.

We're blind, not retarded. I can find a door by myself, thank you. Dogs are nothing more than feedback tools. YOU control THEM. Without O&M skills, a blind person is just a lost man with a dog.
 

Dixie

Farting Snowflakes
Premium Member
Good point. The dog is there to keep the blind person from running into walls, poles, and people. The guide dog, guides the blind person around obstacles the blind person otherwise cannot see. But as for crossing the street or making a left turn to go to Sue Ann's house for a visit, all of that is up to the person, not the dog.

Also note that most seeing-eye dog foundations require that their clients master the cane before using a seeing eye dog. Not every blind person is well suited for a seeing eye dog.

GUIDE DOGS OF AMERICA: Guide dogs for the blind
 

pek1

New Member
And you know what got me--people would see the student in the ahllway, or outside on campus, and would say' "Hi, Freddie" to the dog, but never bother to say "Hi, Matt" to the blind student! How rude can you get? Does disability make peole so nervous that they are comfortable interacting with the animal, but not the person?!!

If I had an answer for that one, jillio, I'd share it with you. Granted, family members of mine greet me, but they also greet Snickers. I sometimes hear people yelling, "a dog!" as if they've never seen one in a business before. Or, they point and stare. Never mind the fact that the main people doing the pointing and staring are parents and grandparents. This is sending a very bad signal to the children; that it's okay to point, stare and gawk at people who, not only have service dogs, but maybe they have a disability. I can think of several examples, but for my own sanity, I will not list them. THESE people, who gawk and stare, are the ones that will get into trouble later in life. Just like there are laws against sexual harrassment now, I'd like to see laws enacted to prohibit people from doing that. Perhaps this is something I should consider when I finish law school and push for this to become law.

You also wouldn't believe the questions I get about my hearing loss, as well as what Snickers does for me.:ugh3::blah::roll:
 

GraysonPeddie

Eye/Hear/Speech Impaired
Premium Member
Nice thread!

Yeah -- I respect service dogs and they're well-respected for helping blind/deaf get around and notifying the handler.

For me, I'm hearing/visual impaired, so I wouldn't need a service dog.
 

Liebling:-)))

Sussi *7.7.86 - 18.6.09*
Premium Member
I support the service dog for the blind only who accompany them in any stores, including PO etc. because they can't see but hearing dog?

Do you mean that you need a hearing dog to go in PO to assist you to get the stamp or whatever?
 
Top