How deaf is she?

Rom

Member
I was hard-of-hearing for two decades but could play the guitar and sing. However, when I became totally deaf in 2001, friends could tune my guitar, but I could never sing in sinc with it.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/tv/news/am...es-away/ar-BBCdRq2?li=BBmkt5R&ocid=spartandhp

I think overcoming her challenges is wonderful, but I wonder how deaf she is?

According to sources, its 110 DB loss. So profound. I would imagine that she remembers a lot of sounds from her hearing days, and that helps, but honestly I think it's more just outstanding work and a little bit of luck on her end. My hearing isn't that bad, but I could never do that!
 

ArestaL

Member
If she is completely deaf, then she must be constantly engaged with the tutor, who gives her tips on proper singing
 

DeafNerdMommy

Well-Known Member
I love from severe to profound depending on ear drum placement and I can hear sounds through my hearing aids sometimes. Instruments are easier to hear. But it might just be the person. Like case by case. I use vocal vibrations to help me with my voice, talking not singing. She could do that.
 

rockin'robin

Well-Known Member
Profound myself, so I could not hear her singing...since she's only been deaf 10 years now...wondering if she has acquired the "accent"?...
 

DeafDucky

Well-Known Member
Profound myself, so I could not hear her singing...since she's only been deaf 10 years now...wondering if she has acquired the "accent"?...

Hard to tell if she does or not- I couldn't tell but I can say her singing voice is very very good. I noted in the other thread- I thought Mandy was better than last year's winner (Grace Vanderwaahl)

she isn't wearing hearing aids...and she did say something about the fact that her illness was something to do with tissue damage and it totally destroyed her auditory nerve (? I can't remember now and I just watched the AGT show on Hulu lol). So would think her loss is profound. Lost it at 18 and now 29.

*Funny thing tho RR- I'm deaf from birth and have been told I don't have a "deaf accent". My loss is in the profound range (now.. it was closer to severe-profound growing up...I think)..and I apparently fool people in thinking I'm hearing. :P Double edged sword there...
 

Barbaro

Well-Known Member
One of my ears is 110 DB loss. I wear both hearing aids and can hear someone sing. I came from a musical family. I have to lean closer to listen to note and beat. I don't like depressing songs, but she has done a wonderful job. She does what she loves to do. Let's enjoy it for a while.
 

Mieke

Belgian ASL noob
Profound myself, so I could not hear her singing...since she's only been deaf 10 years now...wondering if she has acquired the "accent"?...

She doesn't have "the accent"
Though that accent is highly overstated in general I feel.

She did great :)
 

Reba

Retired Terp
Premium Member
One of my ears is 110 DB loss. I wear both hearing aids and can hear someone sing. I came from a musical family. I have to lean closer to listen to note and beat. I don't like depressing songs, but she has done a wonderful job. She does what she loves to do. Let's enjoy it for a while.
Her song was not depressing but uplifting. The "sad" music was during the interview as background mood music.

She did very well, especially hitting the high notes. Some women screech the high notes but her's were smooth and controlled.
 

Barbaro

Well-Known Member
Her song was not depressing but uplifting. The "sad" music was during the interview as background mood music.

She did very well, especially hitting the high notes. Some women screech the high notes but her's were smooth and controlled.

Thanks for clarifying. I didn't watch the whole video online. Whitney Houston was probably one of the singers I enjoy listening. She was so articulate. I admit I like to listen to her famous commercial, AT&T- True Voice. That is the best one ever. I never get tired of it!
 

rockin'robin

Well-Known Member
Thks, Reba...so it's been 10-11 years since she became deaf...already has a "slight" deaf accent. More than likely, the "accent" will become more noticeable as time goes on. So it will affect her singing....??...from what I've been told...deafies sort of "slur" their words...(after losing their hearing a few years)....I have no clue how I sound (and lost my own hearing at 14)...but people do understand me fine...hmmmm...and feel as long as she keeps talking/singing...she will be understood, even with the accent.
I'm no Singer...LOL...(altho' I've tried and everybody tells me to shut up...LOL...) My son told me that it sounded as if I was "screaming"...LOL...No control of my vocals at all.
 

DeafDucky

Well-Known Member
I think she will continue to maintain how her voice sounds singing as she'd be practicing regularly to avoid anything that could ruin the clearness of the vocals and not hitting the right notes.

I've noticed that sometimes I do slur some of the words- mostly blend words like sh-- should shut shout etc. Liked that she learned sign at least instead of trying to rely on lipreading since she cannot wear hearing aids.. I'm guessing.
 

Reba

Retired Terp
Premium Member
I didn't notice an accent when she sang, only when she spoke. The intonations and even breathing for singing and speech are different for each, and with singing she of course practices to get it just right. Even people who stutter when speaking can sometimes sing flawlessly. Voice coaches can do a lot with dedicated singers.
 

Double-U

Member
She doesn't have "the accent"
Though that accent is highly overstated in general I feel.

She did great :)

It varies. I think it depends on the nature of someone's hearing loss, and their history. People who are severely hard of hearing across most or all frequencies do seem to have a common "accent." Those rare people with low frequency hearing loss tend to talk in a high pitched voice.
 
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