I have SO many questions...

shel90

Audist are not welcome
Premium Member
To answer your question, I can cue and I've taught cueing before.

In your opinion, is cued speech good for language development? I was taught that it was good as a teaching tool but not recommended to use for language development.
 

loml

New Member
Looking to learn from you :)

Not good for language. Only as a tool for teaching literacy. IMO

One must have the language in order to be literate in the language, so how does this occur in your scenario? Would you be so kind as to describe for me how you use/see cueing (English) only as a literacy tool? Are you meaning that the instruction for the English reading lesson is carried out in ASL??

I sincerely appreciate you shedding some light on this for me.

Thanks.
:ty:
 

loml

New Member
I'm still trying to grasp how Cueing works... I've got the websites bookmarked to research more... just been focused on some other things Adam has had going on... think it would help too if there were someone in our area that could sit down w/me and explain exactly how it works, ya know?? let me see it in practice-


Hello - I completely understand where you are coming from. :) I would gladly help you try to locate someone in your area. Let me know if you are interested.
 

Adamsmomma

New Member
Hello - I completely understand where you are coming from. :) I would gladly help you try to locate someone in your area. Let me know if you are interested.

Thanks!! I'll certainly keep that in mind! :) :) PM me and I'll give you details about our location.
 

flip

New Member
One must have the language in order to be literate in the language, so how does this occur in your scenario?
I think only parents to new born deaf children would take this statement serious..
Would you be so kind as to describe for me how you use/see cueing (English) only as a literacy tool? Are you meaning that the instruction for the English reading lesson is carried out in ASL??

I sincerely appreciate you shedding some light on this for me.
Thanks.
:ty:
As an expert on Cued Speech, I am honestly curious how you explain that Cued Speech have been left behind by so many teachers of the deaf, escpecially in the 90's? If Cued Speech is the solution for so many deaf children, what did really happen to Cued Speech?
 

shel90

Audist are not welcome
Premium Member
Just to clear up

To correct some of the mistaken information regarding Cued Speech and language processing:

: Cued speech is definitely visual but the "auditory” cortex is used to process phonological the information, as with hearing individuals.
This is completely false. Research shows that the auditory cortext adapts to process visual information in deaf children. A study on the brain led by psychologist Eva Finney of the University of California in San Diego which suggests that depriving the master organ of access to sounds causes it to reorganize so that tissue typically consigned to handling acoustic information instead joins the visual system. Research by Fine, et.al. found visual responses in the auditory cortex of deaf, but not hearing subjects. The visual motion responses observed by Finney, Clementz, Hickok, & Dobkins (2003) in deaf subjects auditopry cortex appeared to be predominately in the right hemisphere.

Deaf children do understand the concept of sound when they are cued to consistently. They need not be aided or implanted in order to understand.


Again, incorrect. What is understood is the visual representation, not the concept of sound itself. The brain cannot process visual stimuli as auditory stimuli unless the brain also has received and processed auditory stimuli at a previous point in time.

The letters are definately the symbols that represent the letters also called graphemes for the language of English print. These letters also represent the sound or phoneme. People/children who are deaf/hoh can and do think in sound with cueing.

A grapheme is defined as a letter in an alphabet. Recognizing the visual representation of a letter, whether in print, through fingerspelling, or CS, does not mean that one also recognizes or identifies the auditory representation of the grapheme. Please see the research on visual processing in the auditory cortex of the deaf. One cannot think in sound unless the brain has processed sound. Therefore, even with visual representations of sound, it is still the visual information that is being processed and used, not the auditory information.

Eden, Lansdale, Cappell, Crain, Zeffiro, and LaSasso (submitted for publication) report results of a study that incorporated functional magnetic resonance (fMRI) brain imaging techniques to learn about how deaf individuals from Cued Speech backgrounds process phonological information. In that study, participants were matched on a word reading task with hearing peers and asked to perform phoneme deletion tasks while in an fMRI scanner. Results of that study revealed that 1) the phonological abilities of Cued Speech users were comparable to their hearing peers, and 2) Cued Speech users use the same parts of the brain, including the so-called“auditory” cortex, to process phonological information as their hearing peers. This study provides fMRI evidence that deaf individuals acquire phonological information comparable to hearing peers. It also suggests that deaf students process phonological information in the same parts of the brain as hearing individuals.
Misleading use of a research finding. While deaf students do process phonological information in the same area of the brain as hearing students (e.g. the auditory cortex) it is well known and accepted in cognitive science and neurology that the information is processed as visual information in deaf students and as auditory information in hearing students.


graphemes of language represent the sounds of speech.
No, they don’t. Graphemes are the representation of the letters of the alphabet in written language.

Cueing does not do artic therapy. What it does do is specify every sound in each word, the sequence and the prosody of the language expression. If a child substitutes or omits sounds while talking, his hands cue them correctly, thereby alerting the child to an error. If the child is able to make the sound correctly, he will know everywhere to insert it. A cueing child makes far fewer errors because his hands are correct.
First sentence says that CS does not do articulation therapy. The second sentence defines what CS does do. The problem here is that the second sentence is describing articulation. The second sentence contradicts the first. The generalization made in the rest of the quote cannot be supported through research anywhere, and is nothing more than a sales pitch to unsuspecting parents.

Cued English is a communication system, not just a therapy tool. It is often used in therapy, and can be used in less than the complete form, but its big advantage is that you are not limited in what you can say. You can cue anything you can say, any rate you talk, so carry-over can happen on the playground or in a class or in the hallway.

CS is not a communication system. It is a mode of spoken language. It is used in therapy as a way to improve articulation, again contradicting the statement that CS “does not do artic therapy”. One is not limited in what one can say, provided one has a fluent use of the language being cued. CS has not been shown, on any level, to increase the fluency of spoken English usage. You can also sign anything you say, at any rate you talk. Carry over can only be achieved is one is in a community of Cuers. Carry over is not possible unless one is communicating with another Cuer, and the number of Cuers are so rare as to make carry over impossible in the vast majority of communicative situations.

Cued English is talking made totally visual and multi-sensory. It is unobtrusive, easy to learn and fits neatly into any communication situation. The cues on the hands guide the brain in messaging the muscles of the mouth. The visual cues are sounds, building words and sentences in the minds of children who don’t make sense of sounds. It goes much deeper than an artic cueing system does.

Looks nice in print, but is actually nothing more than a bunch of words strung together that, in reality, say nothing. This is nothing more than a well constructed sales pitch. Visual cues are not sounds. Sounds are sounds. Visual cues are visual cues.

Definitions of morphemes:
Morphemes are what make up words. Often, morphemes are thought of as words but that is not always true. Some single morphemes are words while other words have two or more morphemes within them. Morphemes are also thought of as syllables but this is incorrect. Many words have two or more syllables but only one morpheme. Banana, apple, papaya, and nanny are just a few examples. On the other hand, many words have two morphemes and only one syllable; examples include cats, runs, and barked.
Definitions
· morpheme: a combination of sounds that have a meaning. A morpheme does not necessarily have to be a word. . Every morpheme is either a base or an affix. An affix can be either a prefix or a suffix.
· affix: a morpheme that comes at the beginning (prefix) or the ending (suffix) of a base morpheme. base: a morpheme that gives a word its meaning. The base morpheme cat gives the word cats its meaning: a particular type of animal.
· prefix: an affix that comes before a base morpheme. The in in the word inspect is a prefix.
· suffix: an affix that comes after a base morpheme. The s in cats is a suffix.
· free morpheme: a morpheme that can stand alone as a word without another morpheme.
· bound morpheme: a sound or a combination of sounds that cannot stand alone as a word.
· inflectional morpheme: this morpheme can only be a suffix. The s in cats is an inflectional morpheme. An inflectional morpheme creates a change in the function of the word.
· derivational morpheme: this type of morpheme changes the meaning of the word or the part of speech or both. Derivational morphemes often create new words.
· allomorphs: different phonetic forms or variations of a morpheme. Example: The final morphemes in the following words are pronounced differently, but they all indicate plurality: dogs, cats, and horses.
· homonyms: morphemes that are spelled the same but have different meanings. Examples: bear (an animal) and bear (to carry), plain (simple) and plain ( a level area of land).
· homophones: morphemes that sound alike but have different meanings and spellings. Examples: bear, bare; plain, plane; cite, sight, site.
Please pay particular attention to homonyms and homophobes. CS will only indicate the pronunciation of these words, and they are pronounced the same. It does nothing to represent the different meaning of the words. Therefore, it is totally useless in representing context.
 

faire_jour

New Member
This is completely false. Research shows that the auditory cortext adapts to process visual information in deaf children. A study on the brain led by psychologist Eva Finney of the University of California in San Diego which suggests that depriving the master organ of access to sounds causes it to reorganize so that tissue typically consigned to handling acoustic information instead joins the visual system. Research by Fine, et.al. found visual responses in the auditory cortex of deaf, but not hearing subjects. The visual motion responses observed by Finney, Clementz, Hickok, & Dobkins (2003) in deaf subjects auditopry cortex appeared to be predominately in the right hemisphere.

This is only true in children who do not use their hearing but use a visual mode of communication.
 

Bottesini

Old Deaf Ranter
Premium Member
Ok WOW I didn't know this would bring about such debate... now I'm even more confused about this Cueing thing than EVER!!!!! :confused::dizzy:

Not very many people use cuing, so it won't be much help to communicate with others.

It would end up mostly just being like home signs.
 

Jiro

If You Know What I Mean
Premium Member
Ok WOW I didn't know this would bring about such debate... now I'm even more confused about this Cueing thing than EVER!!!!! :confused::dizzy:

nothing to be confused about.

1. Cueing is not Jiro-approved and Bott-approved.
2. It is not widely popular.
3. handful of children who used cueing changed to ASL as they grow up
4. Cueing is an EPIC FAIL!

I am Jiro and I approve this message :mad2:
 

Adamsmomma

New Member
nothing to be confused about.

1. Cueing is not Jiro-approved and Bott-approved.
2. It is not widely popular.
3. handful of children who used cueing changed to ASL as they grow up
4. Cueing is an EPIC FAIL!

I am Jiro and I approve this message :mad2:

I might be new here but Jiro-- you crack me up!!! Thank you for lightening up the post there!! :D :D
 

faire_jour

New Member
nothing to be confused about.

1. Cueing is not Jiro-approved and Bott-approved.
2. It is not widely popular.
3. handful of children who used cueing changed to ASL as they grow up
4. Cueing is an EPIC FAIL!

I am Jiro and I approve this message :mad2:

And some cuers learn to use spoken language and are completely oral as adults. Some cuers grow up and continue to cue. Everyone is different.
 

Jiro

If You Know What I Mean
Premium Member
And some cuers learn to use spoken language and are completely oral as adults. Some cuers grow up and continue to cue. Everyone is different.

way too few to make it beneficial for majority. in other word - ineffective. cumbersome. awkward. oxymoronic.
 

shel90

Audist are not welcome
Premium Member
nothing to be confused about.

1. Cueing is not Jiro-approved and Bott-approved.
2. It is not widely popular.
3. handful of children who used cueing changed to ASL as they grow up
4. Cueing is an EPIC FAIL!

I am Jiro and I approve this message :mad2:

:laugh2:
 

Interpretrator

Crime fighter
Premium Member
Meet the new thread...same as the old thread(s).

Anyway, Adamsmomma, I am hearing, was formerly an interpreter and am now a teacher of English grammar and writing for underprepared deaf college students. My master's work is in TESOL/applied linguistics, including language acquisition. I would be happy to chat with you about all this stuff if you would like to send me a PM.
 

flip

New Member
Loml spamming Cued Speech on AD to insecure parents, asking for advice, not advertisement from sales departments, does not mean it's common or effective.

Read some paper today about the impact of fine grain phonetic awarness among hearing children and reading techniques. It seems that all kind of deaf children "lack" this kind of fine grain phonetic awarness. One can imagine how rough the phonetic awarness will be with Cued Speech, for those who are brave enough to use it for everyday communication.
 
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