Hashimoto Disease

ladysolitary85

New Member
So I found out recently that I have Hashimoto Disease and that explains a lot of things that I've been going through lately with my thyroids throwing my body completely out of whack. It's basically when the immune attacks the thyroid mistakingly and is actually a pretty common thyroid disease.

Does anyone here have Hashimoto?
 

ladysolitary85

New Member
Hashimoto's thyroiditis or chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis is an autoimmune disease in which the thyroid gland is attacked by a variety of cell- and antibody-mediated immune processes. It was the first disease to be recognized as an autoimmune disease. It was first described by the Japanese specialist Hakaru Hashimoto in Germany in 1912.

Hashimoto's thyroiditis very often results in hypothyroidism with bouts of hyperthyroidism. Symptoms of Hashimoto's thyroiditis include weight gain, depression, mania, sensitivity to heat and cold, paresthesia, chronic fatigue, panic, bradycardia, tachycardia, congestive heart failure, high cholesterol, reactive hypoglycemia, constipation, migraines, muscle weakness, joint stiffness, menorrhagia, myxedematous psychosis, cramps, memory loss, vision problems, infertility and hair loss.[citation needed]
The thyroid gland may become firm, large, and lobulated in Hashimoto's thyroiditis, but changes in the thyroid can also be nonpalpable. Enlargement of the thyroid is due to lymphocytic infiltration and fibrosis rather than tissue hypertrophy. Physiologically, antibodies against thyroid peroxidase (TPO) and/or thyroglobulin cause gradual destruction of follicles in the thyroid gland. Accordingly, the disease can be detected clinically by looking for these antibodies in the blood. It is also characterized by invasion of the thyroid tissue by leukocytes, mainly T-lymphocytes. It is associated with non-Hodgkin lymphoma.[citation needed]

A family history of thyroid disorders is common, with the HLA-DR5 gene most strongly implicated conferring a relative risk of 3 in the UK. In addition Hashimoto's thyroiditis may be associated with CTLA-4 (Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte Associated-4) gene polymorphisms that result in reduced functioning of the gene's products, which are associated with negative regulation of T-lymphocyte activity. Downregulatory gene polymorphisms affecting CTLA4 are also associated with autoimmune pathology seen in development of Type I diabetes.The strong genetic component underscoring this theory is borne out in studies on monozygotic twins, with a concordance of 38-55%, with an even higher concordance of circulating thyroid antibodies not in relation to clinical presentation (up to 80% in monozygotic twins). Neither result was seen to a similar degree in dizygotic twins, offering strong favour for high genetic aetiology.
Preventable environmental factors, including high iodine intake, selenium deficiency, as well as infectious diseases and certain drugs, have been implicated in the development of autoimmune thyroid disease in genetically predisposed individuals.The genes implicated vary in different ethnic groups and the incidence is increased in patients with chromosomal disorders, including Turner, Down's, and Klinefelter syndromes usually associated with autoantibodies against thyroglobulin and thyroperoxidase. Progressive depletion of these cells as the cytotoxic immune response develops leads to higher degrees of primary hypothyroidism, presenting with a poverty of T3/T4 levels, and compensatory elevations of TSH.
Recent research suggests a potential role for HHV-6 (possibly variant A) in the development or triggering of Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

Hashimoto's thyroiditis - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Hashimoto's Thyroiditis: Symptoms, Causes, and Treatments
 

Jiro

If You Know What I Mean
Premium Member
I thought I had some problem with my thyroid... so I got tested.... none found. whew.

glad that you now know you have it... meaning you can get it treated to function better in life.
 

Reba

Retired Terp
Premium Member
I have problems with my thyroid and autoimmunity but so far haven't been diagnosed as Hashimoto's. It's a long slow process to get diagnosed for anything thru the VA health system. I'm waiting months for an appointment. :(

I don't have all the symptoms but I have some major ones that are affecting my quality of life and daily functioning. It's very discouraging. I can't work and I struggle to get thru daily activities. I hope that I can get this resolved soon.

I suspect my problems are thyroid connected. I'm on Synthyroid, and I also suspect it causes more problems than it cures. I asked my VA doctor about using something other than Synthyroid but she said that's the only treatment the VA provides.
 

ladysolitary85

New Member
When they did blood work on me this is what the results were:

THYROPEROXIDASE ANTIBODY
TPO AB standard range: <=35 IU/mL your value: 945

TSH (THYROID STIMULATING HORMONE)
TSH standard range: 0.10 - 5.50 uIU/mL your value: 21.53

So they have me on Levothyroxine 125 MCG. I go back to get blood work done again probably next month to see if the medication is managing it.
 

ladysolitary85

New Member
I have quite a few of them. Don't mean to give TMI but I was on my period for a solid year. As in every day.

....Yes I'm alive lol I'm surprised it didn't make me anemic. That was to big indicator.

I have depression, low energy, always sensitive to cold.
 

Angel1989

Well-Known Member
Premium Member
apparently it's a very common thyroid disease, feeling very tired lately but at least I got a good doctor and trying to manage it.

I'm glad they figured it out. They test for so many other things first so it usually takes awhile to get this diagnoses. It's good and bad news for you I guess. At least you now know what is going on and hopefully your doctors can help you out. Thyroid diseases can be very difficult to deal with. Good luck!!
 

MangaReader

Active Member
I have quite a few of them. Don't mean to give TMI but I was on my period for a solid year. As in every day.

....Yes I'm alive lol I'm surprised it didn't make me anemic. That was to big indicator.

I have depression, low energy, always sensitive to cold.

I'm on Synthroid as well. .88 mg. Sensitive to the cold too. I thought once the meds regulate the thyroid, I wouldn't be sensitive to the cold anymore but that isn't the case. The blood work shows that my thyroid is stabilized.

I didn't know I had hypothyroidism until I tried to get pregnant. It wasn't happening so I went to the doctor and they checked my thyroid and found it to be low. Got Synthroid and boom, got pregnant right away. Amazing.

I asked my Dr about going on the generic version of Synthroid and she suggested that I stay with the brand because the generic version varies each month and it may not affect me well. I wish I could go on the generic in a way because that would save me on prescription prices. Right now it costs me $27 per month for them without insurance.
 

Angel1989

Well-Known Member
Premium Member
Thyroid medication dosage is very sensitive. It can take awhile to find the correct dose.

Reba, sorry to hear you are having to deal with this. It is difficult since the symptoms can mimic so many other diseases.
 

Angel1989

Well-Known Member
Premium Member
I'm on Synthroid as well. .88 mg. Sensitive to the cold too. I thought once the meds regulate the thyroid, I wouldn't be sensitive to the cold anymore but that isn't the case. The blood work shows that my thyroid is stabilized.

I didn't know I had hypothyroidism until I tried to get pregnant. It wasn't happening so I went to the doctor and they checked my thyroid and found it to be low. Got Synthroid and boom, got pregnant right away. Amazing.

I asked my Dr about going on the generic version of Synthroid and she suggested that I stay with the brand because the generic version varies each month and it may not affect me well. I wish I could go on the generic in a way because that would save me on prescription prices. Right now it costs me $27 per month for them without insurance.


I haven't worked in the pharmacy for quite a few years now. Back then, if your doctor started you on Synthroid you had to stay on Synthroid. If the doctor started you on Levoxol or other generic you had to stay on that. It is one of the few meds where the generic was not considered comparable to brand. Because the dosing has to be exact for every patient, even very slight changes would mess your system up pretty badly.
 

Reba

Retired Terp
Premium Member
I have quite a few of them. Don't mean to give TMI but I was on my period for a solid year. As in every day.

....Yes I'm alive lol I'm surprised it didn't make me anemic. That was to big indicator.
I'm too old for that symptom/effect.

I have depression, low energy, always sensitive to cold.
I have less energy than I used to, and I have muscle weakness and tremors. I can no longer interpret, and I can't even sign in a meaningful way. I can barely write, I can't open containers. I struggle with buttons, grooming, and holding things. I can't stand up for long but I can't sit comfortably either.

This has only started a couple years ago. Before that I was very active (Type A person). Now I feel worthless. :(
 

femme Fatale

Official AD Nutcracker
Autoimmune diseases are really terrifying conditions to go through. My aunt has cerebellum degeneration as a result of an over-active immune system, she is semi-paralyzed within her perrpheral ne:rvous system, thankfully her central nervous system is intact. All of you take care and hope for something to help you. :)
 

ladysolitary85

New Member
Thanks guys, Also nice to know someone else here knows about thyroid meds. It's hard, I have to get up and take this pill every morning and keep from eating for 1 hour (I guess this in a way helps cut my coffee intake). I'm just getting started with these meds hopefully my next blood work will look better, but I'll probably have to take it next monthish.

I wish I had the same support with my family :(
 

Jane B.

Well-Known Member
I'm too old for that symptom/effect.


I have less energy than I used to, and I have muscle weakness and tremors. I can no longer interpret, and I can't even sign in a meaningful way. I can barely write, I can't open containers. I struggle with buttons, grooming, and holding things. I can't stand up for long but I can't sit comfortably either.

This has only started a couple years ago. Before that I was very active (Type A person). Now I feel worthless. :(

With this since you are less than full retirement age you might get more from disability than taking SS at 62.
 

Reba

Retired Terp
Premium Member
Thanks guys, Also nice to know someone else here knows about thyroid meds. It's hard, I have to get up and take this pill every morning and keep from eating for 1 hour (I guess this in a way helps cut my coffee intake). I'm just getting started with these meds hopefully my next blood work will look better, but I'll probably have to take it next monthish.

I wish I had the same support with my family :(
I have the same routine. Take the pill first thing in the morning, then eat breakfast later. I don't really have to wait for breakfast because by the time I wash up, get dressed, make the bed, gather up a load laundry and start it, the hour is just about up anyway.

I fully admit that without Hubby's support I don't know what I'd do. He is so patient with me, and has taken over so many of my household duties. He also installed an extra hand rail on our staircase to make my trips up and down the stairs more stable.
 
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