Are there any deaf real estate agents?

MilitaryGirl83

New Member
Because I am thinking abouto majoring into real estate and I am also very good with computer skills. What classes do I have to take and how long is this? I hope that I am not the only one! :TY: :)
 

SxyPorkie

New Member
FelixKat930 said:
Because I am thinking abouto majoring into real estate and I am also very good with computer skills. What classes do I have to take and how long is this? I hope that I am not the only one! :TY: :)

Go for it...as long as you can speak.....
SxyPorkie
 

Fo'Shizzle

New Member
Here is the courses you will need to take!!!!!


Principles of Real Estate I

Principles of Real Estate II

Law of Agency

Law of Contracts

Real Estate Appraisal

Principles of Real Estate I

Principles of Real Estate II

Law of Agency

Law of Contracts

Brokerage

Principles of Real Estate II

Law of Agency

Law of Contracts



All this came out from Ask jeeves, and it does help if you ask the right thing.. She is asking what courses she would need to take to be able to do this
 

Tousi

Well-Known Member
On top of all of the above skills needed, you need to be really outgoing and know what clients want, etc.
 

Endymion

New Member
Do you mean you want to become a realtor who helps people buy and sell houses? You won't need to major in RE or go to college for it. In most states a few bucks and a test will be enough to get you a license.

If you do become a realtor, you probably also want to get legal to sell mortgages. That way you earn profits from both the house you helped someone buy and the mortgage they get!

But before you think about giant amounts of money, you might want to check this:

Why most real-estate agents aren't getting rich: http://www.slate.com/id/2124506/

But don't let that stop you. There's something far more effective you can do. If you become certified to work as a real estate agent, you can really work the system in your favor and use your license to get and sell properties for dirt cheap!

I'd recommend you study RE in college. If I went to school for a degree in real estate, it'd be to learn how to buy and sell properties for myself. You don't really need a degree, but you can learn some awesome tricks that will really help you make money on your own properties.

On top of that, if you become legal to sell mortgages, you'll get access to rate sheets. Rate sheets are "industry secrets" *cough* *cough* that pretty much tell you what kind of mortgages lenders will be willing to give you.

You would not believe the mortgages you'd qualify for -- they're way cheaper what mortgage brokers sell you! If you can get access to rate sheets as a mortgage salesperson, you can really push the mortgage agent around and get a good deal on money for property.
 

ClearSky

New Member
My cousin took a class and a license in Real Estate. She did not go to college for it, but she worked in a real estate office aswering the phone. She did sell one house though. Maybe a real estate office might help you know where are these classes are? You may have to go to another city to take the license test and renew it when it expires. Don't get discouraged by anything. If you feel in your hear that this is what you want, then go for it. Don't view anything you try that doesn't work as a failure. Nothing is really a failure :).
 

pek1

New Member
FelixKat930 said:
Because I am thinking abouto majoring into real estate and I am also very good with computer skills. What classes do I have to take and how long is this? I hope that I am not the only one! :TY: :)

The state of Minnesota requires 30-hours before the exam is to be taken and you must score at least 75 percent correct. After that, it's an additional 60 hours for a total of 90 hours required for licensing. And yes, in Minnesota, you must be under a broker for at least two years. After that, you can go for your broker's license.

Additionally, continuing education of 30 hours in your first year is required and each year after that, 15 hours minimum is required.

Check out my broker's website; my name is not on it yet, but check back.

http://www.re-masters.com/

Also, check this website out, as this is where I went to get training for my license: http://www.prosource.com/
 

Cousin Vinny

New Member
Endymion said:
But before you think about giant amounts of money, you might want to check this:

Why most real-estate agents aren't getting rich: http://www.slate.com/id/2124506/
That's a good link. I always knew that the RE market was highly entreprenurial, almost akin to the saturated attorney market, but I really had no idea.

I can be a RE agent if I wanted to be. I don't even have to apply for one. I'm already 'automagically' qualified to do that kind of work if I'm so inclined. I wouldn't mind doing so, if the barriers to entry weren't so high already. (The South Florida market is so saturated with RE offerings and RE agents!)
 

LisaMarie

New Member
pek1 said:
The state of Minnesota requires 30-hours before the exam is to be taken and you must score at least 75 percent correct. After that, it's an additional 60 hours for a total of 90 hours required for licensing. And yes, in Minnesota, you must be under a broker for at least two years. After that, you can go for your broker's license.

Additionally, continuing education of 30 hours in your first year is required and each year after that, 15 hours minimum is required.

Check out my broker's website; my name is not on it yet, but check back.

http://www.re-masters.com/

Also, check this website out, as this is where I went to get training for my license: http://www.prosource.com/

Far out! Because this is where im currently taking classes at prosource in the cities! I'm pursing in insurance license also. I didnt realize what i have done is so much similar to yours. :)

and yes Pek1 has already answer most of question what im planning on telling you. Thanks pek1, saving my time and typing! lol!
 

Endymion

New Member
Eyeth said:
That's a good link. I always knew that the RE market was highly entreprenurial, almost akin to the saturated attorney market, but I really had no idea.

I can be a RE agent if I wanted to be. I don't even have to apply for one. I'm already 'automagically' qualified to do that kind of work if I'm so inclined. I wouldn't mind doing so, if the barriers to entry weren't so high already. (The South Florida market is so saturated with RE offerings and RE agents!)

Interesting! And a good post!

I'm not surprised about Florida. Where I usually am, we're overloaded with RE agents. The one big thing is that when you have an oversaturated market, it means that a lot of people are likely not doing things efficiently (economically, the average value of human capital is less than in an exclusive market with a high certification/education barrier to entry).

What this means is that if you study your marketing, you should be fine! Segment, segment, segment. Always. ;) So many realtors I know could benefit from more marketing training!

So anyway, how are you 'automagically' qualified? Endymion is curious! ;)
 

Endymion

New Member
LisaMarie said:
Far out! Because this is where im currently taking classes at prosource in the cities! I'm pursing in insurance license also. I didnt realize what i have done is so much similar to yours. :)

and yes Pek1 has already answer most of question what im planning on telling you. Thanks pek1, saving my time and typing! lol!

Awesome concidence! :dance2:
 

Cousin Vinny

New Member
Endymion said:
So anyway, how are you 'automagically' qualified? Endymion is curious! ;)
I did a little bit more digging in Florida's RE licensing statutes. It does appear that my profession is 'excluded' from RE licensing requirements, but only when it comes to execution of contracts and conveyances.

On another part of the Florida's RE licensing website, it does state that attorneys do not have to undertake the pre-licensure requirements such as schooling, etc. and simply can apply for a broker's license. I assume that they will still have to take the test.

Taken as a whole, I would be safe in asserting that I can be involved in RE transactions, represent a buyer or seller, but not be able to act as a 'broker', listing RE properties for sale and meeting up with random people in hawking property, or recruiting sellers.

According to a Daily Business Review (A South Florida RE publication), attorneys are used extensively, when conveyances reaches certain targets, such as the final purchase price exceeding $1 million, large acreage parcels being sold, shopping complexes, large-scale condonimums, etc. Otherwise, RE brokers dominate the market.
 

diehardbiker

Active Member
I know couple real estate agent that is deaf! It is in Rochester, NY and one of them works for Nothnagle. I dunno if she stilll works there or not.
 

Alex

Administrator
Staff Member
I'm thinking about taking some RE courses in college one of these days. It's for my own knowledge and I think it'll be fun.
 
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