Using an interpreter

Valorrian

Active Member
Deaf ministries are varied and not consistent. They can range from full service (Deaf pastor, teachers, members with separate meeting area) to using professional interpreters who only interpret services, nothing else, to volunteer church members who interpret and minister to the Deaf. You have to be specific when you ask about what's offered at any given church.
I am finding that out. There doesn't seem to be anything around where I live. I had hopes of going to a church this morning with an interpreter but it is about 45 minutes away. I woke up feeling sick and didn't go. I think it was anxiety. Same thing happened last week. I feel stressed just finding a church, it shouldn't be this hard. I have stopped looking for a f2f church and I am just going to keep watching the mass from St. John's on the internet. I can watch it when ever I want and I can play it back over if I miss something. This option doesn't stress me out.
 

Valorrian

Active Member
Yes, you absolutely can and should. For example, if you want to do your own voicing. Whether or not you prefer simultaneous silent speech with signing (SIMCOM), or no lip movement. Slower signing option, more ASL or more English--whatever you want. Let the terp know--they aren't mind readers, ha, ha.
That is a relief. The interpreter won't look down on me if I am not full ASL? I worry that I am not deaf enough to request an interpreter.
 

Reba

Retired Terp
Premium Member
That is a relief. The interpreter won't look down on me if I am not full ASL? I worry that I am not deaf enough to request an interpreter.
A professional interpreter has no place to look down on any client's language abilities. The terp should adjust to your abilities as much as possible. Just be honest and up front about your limitations at the time of making the interpreting appointment, and when first meeting the interpreter.

You might be able to contact a local interpreting agency and request a language skills evaluation to find out how much value you can get from interpreting services at this stage.

Are you involved with a local Deaf services government agency, or a public social Deaf group? It would be beneficial to you to take advantage of local resources with real live people. We have an excellent group in our area but not every area does, sadly. I hope your location does have a non-judgmental welcoming Deaf community.
 

Valorrian

Active Member
A professional interpreter has no place to look down on any client's language abilities. The terp should adjust to your abilities as much as possible. Just be honest and up front about your limitations at the time of making the interpreting appointment, and when first meeting the interpreter.

You might be able to contact a local interpreting agency and request a language skills evaluation to find out how much value you can get from interpreting services at this stage.

You mean take a test? I am too anxious and get panic attacks I'd fail. I'd freeze up for sure.

Are you involved with a local Deaf services government agency, or a public social Deaf group? It would be beneficial to you to take advantage of local resources with real live people. We have an excellent group in our area but not every area does, sadly. I hope your location does have a non-judgmental welcoming Deaf community.
I'm not involved in anything related to deafness (or hearing for that matter) just on the internet. I'm trying to find my way and learn at the moment. I haven't been very receptive in the past. I tried to ignore my hearing loss for a couple of years but it's just not working any more, so I have to learn to deal with it. I can barely make it out of my house on some days due to the anxiety and panic attacks I have. There is no way I am ready to socialize. By nature I am an introvert and don't feel comfortable in groups or socializing. That is why my therapist suggested I go to church and just watch the interpreter and deaf/hoh people from a far. It would a no pressure thing and I can't even make myself do that.
 

Lysander

Well-Known Member
As a consumer, you need to keep the interpreters informed of your needs. Let the interpreter know that you need to have medical terms explained, and also have that conveyed to the hearing medical staff. There's nothing wrong with asking for explanation of medical terms. Hearing people do that, and you should, too.
As a medical professional, it's my job to ensure that you know what is happening and that you understand how things work so that you can make an informed decision about your healthcare. If I'm talking to another medical professional, I'll use language they will know. If I'm talking to a person with no medical background, I will use language that will help them understand how things work. It's their job to word it in such a way so that you understand everything. So if you don't understand something, don't just nod and accept that you don't understand the information. Tell them you don't quite understand and ask them to use different language. I know some of us can be arrogant jerks in the medical field, but we really do have your best interest at heart and we really want you to make your best informed decision. We'll go out of our way to make sure you can do it, but we need you to let us know what you get and what you don't.
 

Valorrian

Active Member
Today, I went to the eye doctor. I expressed my concern over him dilating my eyes. He said not to worry that he didn't plan dilating them. He explained that if I need prescription for glasses the dilation would induce potential changes to a prescription that aren’t present in the normal state of the eye. I am near sighted and need glasses to drive. He explained to me that I should wear them when I am going to be focusing on something far way for a long period of time like driving, watching a movie or even in school. He said I don't have to wear them all the time. Just for those sorts of things. They will help me focus better. I can't tell you how relieved I am and this over.
 
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