Two IT questions

naisho

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Good job on the midterm!

But what the heck, a kind of question like this penalized. So damn stupid. Like I said.. even experienced and knowledgeable people are stumped over questions like this that serve no ulterior purpose than to make the person confused and read an excess that isn't really required. And the question seems confusing itself, as basic IT individuals have no idea how to respond properly even as it is multiple choice questions.

I'm sure cmdr can testify.. After you take these tests, and look back, WHOOSH!
 

cmdrwhitewolf

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First off - Congrats on the test! That's a score to be proud of!

As far as the correct answer to that question goes, it conflicts with both my personal experience and several technical books I've used, so I wonder if it really is a 'Cheater Detection' question. Meaning that, the answer their expecting is purposely "not correct" in order to catch those who simply memorize a brain dump off the web. Apparently, several companies purposely seed their question pools in this fashion because of such brain dumps, and it serves the dual purpose of catching people who brain dump, as well as acting as a evidence for 'copyright infringement' when suing whoever was hosting the brain dumps.

The reason why I know this, is because some years ago on a windows exam, a friend of mine ran into questions like these and practically drove himself spare trying to reconcile what was in all authoritative technical texts including the expensive approved study guide, but since the expected answer conflicted with everything written about it, as well as our personal experience which told us otherwise. He doggedly chased it down with the testing company, claiming they got it wrong, but then someone at the company explained what was really going on there. Hence, this became one of my biggest beefs with such test tricks, their forcing a candidate to resort to rote memorization on certain items, which (to me anyhow) cheapens the whole purpose of the achieving the certification - being qualified on your subject. :growl:
 

AlleyCat

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Thank you guys about the midterm scores. I'm pretty happy with it too.

As for that question .. You guys could be right. It is frustrating not to be able to figure out a question that seems easy, word-wise, yet be so generic that we can't come up with a correct answer. Hope I don't continue to get more like these! :)
 

naisho

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I don't want to be the one to say it, so let us just change my voice and pretend I'm another person.

'Sister, ever since you signed the aforementioned contract to enter our world, you are forever entitled to misery, despair, anger, frustration, anxiety, and brashness. Under contracts of FD7-CCA18881021 this will continue until you've received due certification.'
 

AlleyCat

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In a new chapter, we are talking about layers (specifically, the 7 layers of a network.) In the Application layer (layer 7) it is asked what software can be found at this layer. In my book, the only thing that's mentioned (from the choices below) is HTTP. Even though I didn't think HTTP was actually a software. It's not. So when I kept getting that wrong I did a search online. The one thing I found was FTP. Do you agree? Why?

a) FTP
b) TCP
c) HTTP
d) IPX
 

AlleyCat

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I did more researching online and decided FTP and HTTP did apply. I re-took this homework quiz, and that was correct. So it was a and c ... (go figure -- why I have to go digging online and not be able to find these answers in my own book I do not understand ...)
 

naisho

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Yeah, FTP and HTTP are web transport protocols - their abbreviations will give it away.
FTP - File Transfer Protocol
HTTP - Hyper Text Transfer Protocol

Both of them are application specific - For FTP, the usage is to transfer files on the 'net from your client to the server. You're doing this whenever you upload pictures to your webhost or your server, although some of these today utilize webtools to do it so you don't have to use a FTP client.

HTTP commands are somewhat vice versa, since it directs a command to the webserver to retrieve info back.

In graphic representation, it's kind of like this if you don't understand.

FTP
Client initiates file transfer -------------> Server
or
Client initiates file receive signal -------> Server then Server -----------> transfers to Client
Memory transfers are taking place both ways


HTTP is just one way
Client----(connection signal)---->Server then server sends back HTML (webpage) output ----------> Client to display on browser. But there are no actual file transfers taking place, only downloads of web output.


IPX and TCP are not application layers.
TCP - Transfer Control Protocol - The purpose of TCP is to utilize and make sure that the data received is the data sent. This makes it more of a "checker" layer in which it verifies the process of the data being sent between the computers. TCP works both over the web and LAN.
IPX - Intertwined-network Packet Exchange - something like that, is similar to above, but the data being transferred is limited to a LAN only. Meaning, all data here is never able to transmit over the internet.

Hope that helps.

I dunno why they don't translate it down in layman's terms, that's the hardest part to understanding. When it's beyond you, you'll just be like :wtf:
 

AlleyCat

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LOL, I DO wish they would put it in layman's terms !!

Here's another question I keep getting wrong. It's the last one and then I'm done with this chapter.

Which of the following problems can occur at the Physical layer? (Choose all that apply.)
a) NIC driver problems
b) incorrect IP addresses
c) signal errors caused by noise
d) incorrect segment size

I initially thought it was a and c because my book specificially says "problems that occur here are often related to electrical noise that scrambles the signals (which would be "c") and NICs that are misconfigured or don't work correctly (which seems to be "a")" and then online I found incorrect segment size also is a factor, so I've been using a combination of all 4 (mostly a, c, and d) and everything has been incorrect.

Any ideas ?
 

naisho

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C is definitely an answer in this.
C is an anwer, noise signal errors are absolutely a factor in determining problems in the physical layer.

B is totally out, like a puppy in a crew of kittens.
A and D seem kind of sketchy.. A doesn't exactly pertain directly to a cause of problems in the physical layer, and D I don't really know.

I would go C alone first, to see if it is taken.
Then the rest you already tried, so that's the only thing I can think of that isn't there.
 

AlleyCat

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Hey AC, What kind of book you have? I might help you.

"Networking Technologies" 5th edition.

C is definitely an answer in this.
C is an anwer, noise signal errors are absolutely a factor in determining problems in the physical layer.

B is totally out, like a puppy in a crew of kittens.
A and D seem kind of sketchy.. A doesn't exactly pertain directly to a cause of problems in the physical layer, and D I don't really know.

I would go C alone first, to see if it is taken.
Then the rest you already tried, so that's the only thing I can think of that isn't there.

Naisho, you were absolutely right. I took that question again this morning and it's correct! Thank you! :) (I forgot to write this down so when I took that question, I had to remember what you wrote here so I was kind of operating on a semi-guess that you had said C, and whew! LOL)
 

AlleyCat

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New question!

What protocols are connectionless?

IP
UDP
TCP
SMTP
NETBios

I do know TCP is a connection-oriented protocol, so that's out. I do know IP and UDP are connectionless.

However I can't get this right as far as SMTP and NETBios.

Clues, anyone? Thanks!
 

naisho

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udp, netbios, ip

no time to explain, i think you'll find a better answer searching
time for class! good luck
 

AlleyCat

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udp, netbios, ip

no time to explain, i think you'll find a better answer searching
time for class! good luck

Ok, thank you. Next time I take that question I'll give that a shot. I knew A, B were correct as I said above, but couldn't figure out D or E. I looked online and I found stuff saying BOTH D & E were connectionless, yet when I applied that on the question it was wrong. I will try just E with A and B. Thanks!
 

deafhalo

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Ok, thank you. Next time I take that question I'll give that a shot. I knew A, B were correct as I said above, but couldn't figure out D or E. I looked online and I found stuff saying BOTH D & E were connectionless, yet when I applied that on the question it was wrong. I will try just E with A and B. Thanks!

Use wiki (I'm sure you use this?) and search each type of protocols. They help me a lot on answering these questions!

Good luck!

PS. NETBios is connectionless.
 

AlleyCat

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Use wiki (I'm sure you use this?) and search each type of protocols. They help me a lot on answering these questions!

Good luck!

PS. NETBios is connectionless.


I try to avoid wikipedia. Many times information on wiki is incorrect regardless of the subject.

I was looking up a whole bunch of different network sites for information. And who knows who posts this information because I've gotten incorrect information off there too. For example I found sites that said STMP and NETBios are connectionless, so I was using those in my answers and guess what? They're wrong!

I re-took this question 7 times trying to get it right, and turns out the answer is only IP and UDP. Of course, it's entirely possible the teacher could have set this up incorrectly.
 

deafhalo

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I try to avoid wikipedia. Many times information on wiki is incorrect regardless of the subject.

I was looking up a whole bunch of different network sites for information. And who knows who posts this information because I've gotten incorrect information off there too. For example I found sites that said STMP and NETBios are connectionless, so I was using those in my answers and guess what? They're wrong!

I re-took this question 7 times trying to get it right, and turns out the answer is only IP and UDP. Of course, it's entirely possible the teacher could have set this up incorrectly.

That's true that sometime Wiki ain't perfect. But close enough.

Yeah, sometime it's a pain that the teachers do this kind of things then I have to argues what is really right. Ugh. But most of the time they're correct as they double checked.

So...good luck with your study! :)
 

AlleyCat

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That's true that sometime Wiki ain't perfect. But close enough.

Yeah, sometime it's a pain that the teachers do this kind of things then I have to argues what is really right. Ugh. But most of the time they're correct as they double checked.

So...good luck with your study! :)

Thank you!

I am still going to ask the teacher about NETBios because both you and Naisho (and also what I found researching online) all say this is connectionless. So why would that be wrong on the homework quiz? Makes no sense to me.
 
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