The Cochlear Implant Isn't Always What You Think It Is

Paullys50

Member
It actually was an opinion piece. I thought that much was clear, but perhaps not.

By "slightly viral" I meant it had been shared on Facebook 2,300 times, which was nice, for me anyway. :)

So really you were just trying to generate traffic by posting here as well.
 

AlleyCat

Well-Known Member
Um actually no. At best they're functionally HOH. That's not really a new or own class.... There have always been deaf people who are functionally HOH.

You don't know that for a fact, especially since you do not have a CI. Neither do I, yet I don't go around labeling people for how they're doing with their CIs or HAs. All I know is that there are varied responses, and I accept that for what that is. Not assumptions from someone who doesn't have a CI. Stop correcting people for their CI or HA performance.
 

ambrosia

Well-Known Member
Premium Member
I am not a CI user but I have meet and been friends with a few. I have noticed that people forget CI users are not deaf but not hearing. They are their own class, and should be proud of it.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-N900A using AllDeaf App mobile app

Maybe I'll agree that we're our own class, up to a point, but I disagree that I'm not deaf.

I am deaf, but a deaf woman that can hear. Amazing!!! Right now the only thing I can hear is my tinnitus. My battery died probably 30 minutes ago but I'm cozy under a blanket, playing around on my phone and haven't felt like getting up and changing the battery. Without my CI I am 100% deaf.

I also disagree with deafdyke, I'm not "functionally hoh" either. That would be a silly way to describe me. I can hear much better with my CI than I ever did with a hearing aid when I was ACTUALLY hoh, and I've only been activated for 3.5 months. I had progressive loss, I say HAD because I have 0 hearing left to lose, it's all gone. I experienced basically the entire audiogram and I can tell you that my experience with my CI as deaf woman is very little like my experience as a hoh woman with hearing aids. Most people wouldn't know I'm deaf unless I tell them.

That said, as has been said already, everyone's experience is different so slapping labels on people and sticking them in boxes is silly.
 

drphil

Active Member
One would imagine that person's Audi would correct any misconception re: Cochlear Implants prior to implanation.

That is my experience way back in 2007 when implanted.
 

sappstter

Member
I think we can all agree that is not perfect and nothing is going to be better then good natural hearing. Its an alternative and a tool.

Just curious how do you support yourself without hearing? Not picking on you but I would honestly like to know, I've looked into this a few times and I don't see many jobs or any at all that pay well. I couldn't do my current job without hearing unfortunately.

The problem with ASL is it requires others to know it as well. Not everyone is so accommodating.
 

LoveBlue

Well-Known Member
I think we can all agree that is not perfect and nothing is going to be better then good natural hearing. Its an alternative and a tool.



Just curious how do you support yourself without hearing? Not picking on you but I would honestly like to know, I've looked into this a few times and I don't see many jobs or any at all that pay well. I couldn't do my current job without hearing unfortunately.



The problem with ASL is it requires others to know it as well. Not everyone is so accommodating.


Though there are some jobs where hearing may be essential, most jobs can be done by the deaf IF the hearing people (hiring managers, co-workers, etc) would be accommodating and use visual means to communicate. Like emails, Instant messaging, texting, etc. Plus for situations where those won't work, interpreters or CART can be used. The employer is required to provide accommodations.
 

shel90

Audist are not welcome
Premium Member
I think we can all agree that is not perfect and nothing is going to be better then good natural hearing. Its an alternative and a tool.

Just curious how do you support yourself without hearing? Not picking on you but I would honestly like to know, I've looked into this a few times and I don't see many jobs or any at all that pay well. I couldn't do my current job without hearing unfortunately.

The problem with ASL is it requires others to know it as well. Not everyone is so accommodating.

Stop thinking what deaf people CANT do but what employers CAN do to make the jobs accessible for us.
 

shel90

Audist are not welcome
Premium Member
I like my CI so far but it is not a big part of my life like ASL is. That's how much ASL has impacted my life for the better. With a CI, I don't have that full access like I do with ASL.
 

drphil

Active Member
The listed study deals with children born deaf. Their parents- expectations teachers reality in lower school.

Not exactly the situation of adults becoming deaf.
 

sappstter

Member
Stop thinking what deaf people CANT do but what employers CAN do to make the jobs accessible for us.

I would like to think that way, but is it reality. I'm not trying to be difficult, just realistic... I will likely lose all of my hearing and need CIs in the future in order to continue to provide for my family.
 

sappstter

Member
Though there are some jobs where hearing may be essential, most jobs can be done by the deaf IF the hearing people (hiring managers, co-workers, etc) would be accommodating and use visual means to communicate. Like emails, Instant messaging, texting, etc. Plus for situations where those won't work, interpreters or CART can be used. The employer is required to provide accommodations.

Anyone having any success with this? I think this is a possibility if you are already employed and lose you're hearing. Getting through a job interview and getting the job is already difficult enough. I can't imagine winning the job over someone who will require less accommodations and will be easier to communicate with. I am an engineer which is typically a great career for introverted socially awkward individuals. I still have to use the phone both at my desk and for conference calls as well as meeting with clients and other companies in person. I use instant messaging and email as much as possible, but I can't seem to avoid the need for some sort of audible conversation.

When I first lost my hearing I had no hearing aids for 3 months, it was impossible to get people to communicate with me with just written communication. People just aren't that accommodating and get frustrated in my experience.

I would like to believe that CIs are a solution to continue to function in society somewhat normally. I've gone to several CI meets and have met people who were able to continue working as they were before with CIs.

Is there anyone here who has experienced the level of accommodations and continued career growth without CIs? I'm sure there must be a few, I'd like to hear about it as it would be encouraging.
 

LoveBlue

Well-Known Member
Anyone having any success with this? I think this is a possibility if you are already employed and lose you're hearing. Getting through a job interview and getting the job is already difficult enough. I can't imagine winning the job over someone who will require less accommodations and will be easier to communicate with. I am an engineer which is typically a great career for introverted socially awkward individuals. I still have to use the phone both at my desk and for conference calls as well as meeting with clients and other companies in person. I use instant messaging and email as much as possible, but I can't seem to avoid the need for some sort of audible conversation.

When I first lost my hearing I had no hearing aids for 3 months, it was impossible to get people to communicate with me with just written communication. People just aren't that accommodating and get frustrated in my experience.

I would like to believe that CIs are a solution to continue to function in society somewhat normally. I've gone to several CI meets and have met people who were able to continue working as they were before with CIs.

Is there anyone here who has experienced the level of accommodations and continued career growth without CIs? I'm sure there must be a few, I'd like to hear about it as it would be encouraging.
I didn't say it would be easy. I've been unemployed a couple of times recently and have run into problems with recruiters and hiring managers that may have rejected me based on my hearing difficulties. My most recent job I was surprised the hiring manager wanted to hire me (perhaps she couldn't find anyone else) as I was having difficulty hearing on the phone and thought I blew the phone interview. Eventually I got called for a face-to-face with her and still had some problems. So I was surprised when the agency called and said she wanted me.

I've since gotten new hearing aids, with the help of voc rehab, and am hearing better (not perfect) on the phone, so this go around with job hunting is not as bad as the last two times. I can't say for sure most times how much my hearing difficulties is affected my interviews because I don't do well with interviews anyway.
 

sappstter

Member
I didn't say it would be easy. I've been unemployed a couple of times recently and have run into problems with recruiters and hiring managers that may have rejected me based on my hearing difficulties. My most recent job I was surprised the hiring manager wanted to hire me (perhaps she couldn't find anyone else) as I was having difficulty hearing on the phone and thought I blew the phone interview. Eventually I got called for a face-to-face with her and still had some problems. So I was surprised when the agency called and said she wanted me.

I've since gotten new hearing aids, with the help of voc rehab, and am hearing better (not perfect) on the phone, so this go around with job hunting is not as bad as the last two times. I can't say for sure most times how much my hearing difficulties is affected my interviews because I don't do well with interviews anyway.

I can understand that, I struggle with my hearing as well. I get anxiety every time my phone rings at work, it is a real struggle. Job interviews are tuf too, so far that hasn't been an issue for me not to say that it wont be in the future. I have had to ask them to repeat questions a few times, but it hasn't been an issue. My point is I still need my hearing, if I lost my hearing I would need CIs to continue to work. I couldn't just rely on ASL for what I do for a living.
 

AlleyCat

Well-Known Member
I can understand that, I struggle with my hearing as well. I get anxiety every time my phone rings at work, it is a real struggle. Job interviews are tuf too, so far that hasn't been an issue for me not to say that it wont be in the future. I have had to ask them to repeat questions a few times, but it hasn't been an issue. My point is I still need my hearing, if I lost my hearing I would need CIs to continue to work. I couldn't just rely on ASL for what I do for a living.

What line of work are you in that you need to be able to use the phone? I'm just curious, not criticizing. As for me, I'm a graphic designer and all my work is computer-based, so I don't need hearing in order to do my job. That's why I was wondering what you do.

If you are certain your hearing will decrease (as you wrote in an earlier post), and phone usage is a requirement, you may need to consider a career change. It happens to many of us. You can go back to school, especially with VR support, and learn a new career. (I know I'm "glossing" over here -- it's not a piece of cake or an overnight change, it does take time, BUT .. it can happen. I went to college majoring in Business Management and minoring in Fine Arts, and after graduation, I could not find any management-style job that would hire me for the life of me because of not being able to use the phone, so I changed direction and used my Fine Arts skills and ended up being a very good graphic designer instead.)
 

DeafDucky

Well-Known Member
@Sappstter

I know of quite a few Deaf people who use neither CI nor HA (either because they don't work for them or in one cause because their dog chewed the hearing aid...) and are gainfully employed in an otherwise 'hearing world' position. They didn't have any problems getting the job, getting accommodations or holding down the job to "provide" for their family (or themselves if single.

Yes it is a lot tougher for deaf to get through an interview but even hearing people blow interviews all the time with various mistakes (I see lots and lots of 'lists' of what not to do on interviews- some of them just floor me.

Your situation is not the same as any other deaf; it ALMOST feels like you are saying that those who do not use HA or CI can't do any better job wise (and if I did read that wrong apologies).

I do wear hearing aids but I still avoid the phone like the plague if I can help it. I know that I've blown interviews because of my deafness (at least one did hire me anyway). In my experience upon hired most were more than happy to accommodate my needs or find work arounds. I almost NEVER used the phone in my last job except maybe for those weekly defects conference calls (and even then I didn't do those often). Most people didn't take long to realize email or face to face was better. I even had a Team Lead at one time try to convince TPTB to allow our department to use some sort of Instant Messaging (they said no- because of the type of business it was I guess).

I am looking again right now but to me I suspect MAYBE the two bigger issues are my age and my own stupid procrastinating are factors not my deafness though that's third.
 

sappstter

Member
What line of work are you in that you need to be able to use the phone? I'm just curious, not criticizing. As for me, I'm a graphic designer and all my work is computer-based, so I don't need hearing in order to do my job. That's why I was wondering what you do.

If you are certain your hearing will decrease (as you wrote in an earlier post), and phone usage is a requirement, you may need to consider a career change. It happens to many of us. You can go back to school, especially with VR support, and learn a new career. (I know I'm "glossing" over here -- it's not a piece of cake or an overnight change, it does take time, BUT .. it can happen. I went to college majoring in Business Management and minoring in Fine Arts, and after graduation, I could not find any management-style job that would hire me for the life of me because of not being able to use the phone, so I changed direction and used my Fine Arts skills and ended up being a very good graphic designer instead.)

I'm a mechanical engineer and I quite of computer based work as well. My work requires coordination with other engineering disciplines and clients. I have to do quite a few conference calls as well do discuss design issues and progress.

Job kick off meetings or being given job information is all verbal and would be difficult to do otherwise.

I could do some aspects of my job without hearing, but I would definitely be limited. Progressing in my career without hearing would be very difficult.
 

sappstter

Member
@Sappstter

I know of quite a few Deaf people who use neither CI nor HA (either because they don't work for them or in one cause because their dog chewed the hearing aid...) and are gainfully employed in an otherwise 'hearing world' position. They didn't have any problems getting the job, getting accommodations or holding down the job to "provide" for their family (or themselves if single.

Yes it is a lot tougher for deaf to get through an interview but even hearing people blow interviews all the time with various mistakes (I see lots and lots of 'lists' of what not to do on interviews- some of them just floor me.

Your situation is not the same as any other deaf; it ALMOST feels like you are saying that those who do not use HA or CI can't do any better job wise (and if I did read that wrong apologies).

I do wear hearing aids but I still avoid the phone like the plague if I can help it. I know that I've blown interviews because of my deafness (at least one did hire me anyway). In my experience upon hired most were more than happy to accommodate my needs or find work arounds. I almost NEVER used the phone in my last job except maybe for those weekly defects conference calls (and even then I didn't do those often). Most people didn't take long to realize email or face to face was better. I even had a Team Lead at one time try to convince TPTB to allow our department to use some sort of Instant Messaging (they said no- because of the type of business it was I guess).

I am looking again right now but to me I suspect MAYBE the two bigger issues are my age and my own stupid procrastinating are factors not my deafness though that's third.


What are these people employed doing for a living? Above mentioned graphic designer which is interesting and seems like a good career.
 
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