forklift

LilCueballRulez

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Aye i wonderin, is there any deafies can driving a forklift? I curiously is that forklift like same car? How long will you learn so quickly when you drive a forklift? is it require to read abt safety reason rules before take drive a forklift?
 

dereksbicycles

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One of my friend is Hoh and has driven forklifter on his job. Yes, you'll have to get training or even classes to learn to operate one. The best luck to you if you want to drive one.
 

radioman

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When I worked at armstrong world industries, all summer college workers had to go through forklift training, doesnt matter if you are working on paper machines, cafeteria, yard, packaging. I too had to go through the training each summer. They had both hands on training and video. I told them I cannot hear video and I need script so they had one typed up for my training.

Rule number one - its not a car.
rule number two - you are operating a dangerous machinery.

Not all forklifts are the same. I used the walk behind battery operated models, propane models,electric models and diesel 10 ton models (biiiig forklifts).

Operating a forklift is all about safety and skill. Not on your ability to drive a car. I have personally witnessed a coworker getting his leg clipped from the forks so its not a pretty sight. Again - its about safety and I
know we deaf/hoh CAN do it. I did.
A little tip - I prefer the noisy propane and diesel forklifts as they can hear me coming, the electric ones requires ALOT of watching out for others as its pretty quiet compared to the combustible engines.
 

JMH

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I have been driving forklift for over 20 years at three different jobs (I'm deaf). Yes, I believe deaf people can drive forklift as long as they're serious and safety-minded drivers.

Forklift may have steer wheel, brake pedal, and drive around like car BUT its not same thing. Forklift can turn really quick and can stop at dime. One tiny mistake can cause some serious injury such as tip over, run into someone else. It takes some skills to drive it.

I like propane forklift because its powerful and has two brake pedals which I can easily use right feet on gas and left feet on brake that give me wide varies of forklift tricks plus better safety. Electronic forklift is best for indoor. But the one I'm using right now has only one brake pedal that are closer to gas and I cannot use similar tricks as I had with propane. :(

Yes, electronic forklift is quiet, but it do making noises when you drive backward. As for forward, it depends on the surround, if you are approach the corner/intersection, use horn.

Being on forklift, you have to use your best judgement - take your time, no hurry. If you don't feel comfortable or safe, don't drive it.
 

LilCueballRulez

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Hey everyone,

Yeah, i was talked to my counselor about forklift. Thanks for your sharing information over forklift things. I not really scare of everything because i already thought. I am divorced in progress which i have to trying a new experience in my new life. I want to take class for motorcycle and forklift for my life *smiles*
 

JMH

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Well, I'm not sure if there any classes for forklift... many companies usually provide forklift certification & training. When I first learned forklift, I never went to class or had someone train me - I learned as I drive. On my second & current job, we were required to take certification test via their own program and I noticed employees that drive forklift for the first time were trained by employers.

To warn you that many jobs might feel skeptical having deaf person drive forklift. I went through many, many job interviews and they seems skeptical and concerned about safety, but they were impressed that I had 20 years of experience. I have met several deaf people who already has forklift certified and their work refused to allow them drive forklift.

The question for you, do you work at a job that have forklift? Maybe you can talk to your boss and put you through certification test and some training. This is the best way to obtain forklift experience. Just an idea.
 

Evo Dragon

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I used to work for redesign cabinet company for one year. My Boss taught me how to use forklift without request a certificate. It's easy.

I quited and I don't like it. I've had some sinus problem and cough from dust in the air inside warehouse while cutting any woods for build cabinets.
 

VamPyroX

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To my knowledge, operating forklifts are usually the opposite of cars.

In a car, the back wheels are straight and the front wheels turn as far as 45 degrees to the right or the left. Because of this, you can't turn on a dime.

In a forklift, the front wheels are straight and the back wheels turn as far as 90 degrees to the right or the left. Because of this, you can turn on a dime.

Imagine driving your car in reverse. When you turn the steering wheel, the car changes direction quicker than it does when you're going forward. That's how it is on a forklift. That's why you have to be extra careful when operating a forklift. That's why training is required (recommended). A lot of forklift jobs include training. If you're already trained, that's a plus.
 

Bebonang

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When I worked at armstrong world industries, all summer college workers had to go through forklift training, doesnt matter if you are working on paper machines, cafeteria, yard, packaging. I too had to go through the training each summer. They had both hands on training and video. I told them I cannot hear video and I need script so they had one typed up for my training.

Rule number one - its not a car.
rule number two - you are operating a dangerous machinery.

Not all forklifts are the same. I used the walk behind battery operated models, propane models,electric models and diesel 10 ton models (biiiig forklifts).

Operating a forklift is all about safety and skill. Not on your ability to drive a car. I have personally witnessed a coworker getting his leg clipped from the forks so its not a pretty sight. Again - its about safety and I
know we deaf/hoh CAN do it. I did.
A little tip - I prefer the noisy propane and diesel forklifts as they can hear me coming, the electric ones requires ALOT of watching out for others as its pretty quiet compared to the combustible engines.

That is exactly what the workers need to have safety of operating the forklift and to be able handle the forklift like a professional. It is not easy to operate the machinery like the forklift. My husband used to go through classes even if he had experienced working on dangerous machinery. He was very glad to get that training under control for him and to learned how to be safe while handling the machinery. One native man had a very huge machinery and it fell on him and crushed him to death. He did not learned to be safe. So go to the class for forklift training. I don't know if that should be involved in hearing but I hope they will tell you what you need to know. Good luck.
 

whiskeyonesix

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I've driven a Forklift for nearly 20 years now, I'd much rather drive a desk hehehe :) but it's a useful skill to have - a good forkie is never out of work.
I'm on one for upto 11 hours a day these days.
My Boss knows of my poor hearing, but I compensate with using my eyes and not speeding.
I drive an ancient Komatsu 3.5 tonne Counterbalance truck at the moment, although when I worked at Land-Rover back in the UK before I Emigrated, I drove an electric Reach truck - that was fun, you could realy zip around on that :)
Also driven the Rough-Terrain JCB loaders for the British Army, and a Combilift/Side-Loader.

I don't there's any regulations barring deaf people from operating machinery or driving forklifts - best to get clarification of that from whoever does forklift training.
 

JMH

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There is no regulation about hearing impaired with forklift. Last Winter, I worked at a very large company that are very, very strict on safety. But they allowed me to drive forklift.
 
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