Doctor's office refused to provide interpreter!!!

Kaitin

New Member
This is just pitiful and no excuse!! Definite violation of confidentiality. This type of behavior just IRKS me to the nth degree!! :pissed::pissed::pissed:

Also a side note.... as far as the ADA...am I right that if the Dr. office is small and has less than 15 on his staff, do they still have to follow ADA?? I thought that if it was a small practice or business, less than 15 then can get out of following ADA. Am I wrong? Not that I agree with that mind you...but I'm just wondering if that is part of the situation going on with the original poster, or if it's just plain ole stupidity?

I think you are right. But I wonder if the doctor was unethical because refused to see her. And maybe unethical if no "reasonable accomodation" like the ADA for better relationship and communication with a deaf/HoH patient.

Health Care Delivery and and Deaf People: Practice, Problems, and Recommendations for Change (Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education, Vol 4, 73-110) is a fascinating article I think.

Some quotes from the article: "Recent surveys of practicing physicians have demonstrated an extraordinary level of ignorance about the act (ADA) and the doctor's obligations under this legislation. All of the 165 physicians surveyed at a recent conference "displayed ignorance about their legal obligations under the" act to their deaf clients. -

During their medical education, physicians typically receive training on the pathology of hearing loss and, as a result, tend to medicalize deaf patients in a way that can be interpreted as paternalistic. These perspectives can interfere with the physician's ability to perceive their deaf consumers as healthy and well-adjusted human beings. "Because of their views of Deaf people as 'disabled,' the medical practitioner often deals with them in a condescending manner that betrays their inherent belief that 'deaf and dumb' is not a misnomer." -

During their medical education, few doctors receive training around communication or cultural issues with deaf individuals. Ebert and Heckerling (1995) conducted a survey of 102 internal medicine physicians at one university medical center to examine their understanding of the communication needs of their d/hoh patients. All respondents stated that they needed to spend more time and effort when working with d/hoh patients. Thirty-seven percent believed that writing notes or speechreading offered the best ways to communicate with deaf patients. Forty-one percent of those surveyed said they relied on writing notes for their deaf patients more than half of the time. Only 19% regularly employed an interpreter. Remaining physicians used speechreading, gestures, or asked family members to interpret for the patient. In a survey of 165 doctors, the majority stated they had difficulty communicating with and understanding their deaf clients. Finally, in a survey of 87 deaf people, 60% of whom were prelingually deaf, 59% stated they understood their doctor "sometimes" or "not at all." The patients also noted their health care providers often wrote illegibly or wrote notes that were beyond their literacy level. -

The use of a sign language interpreter is often the only way nonsigning individuals can communicate with deaf people. However, health care providers have historically been resistant to the necessity of employing and using these professional, despite the Disability Act and other laws that mandate use of an interpreter under certain situations.
"

After reading the thread and article I think all deaf/HoH need to know their rights about health care because maybe your doctor doesn't know or care (my dad is a doctor and I like my doctors so I don't mean all doctors are bad). We must protect our health and get good care and respect from doctors.
 

Lantana

New Member
I would think that the receptionist would be the one chosen to weed people out. We would need to know the whole story before we could offer any advice. How often do you go to the doctor and demand an interpreter??

Share the details.

Lantana
 

deafskeptic

Active Member
Premium Member
I would think that the receptionist would be the one chosen to weed people out. We would need to know the whole story before we could offer any advice. How often do you go to the doctor and demand an interpreter??

Share the details.

Lantana

Look here, we have rights to a terp and just reading this thread is enough to make my blood boil. All you have to do is read the first post so you get details.

Lucia is a human being who has a right to easy communication. Many of us have been there also and I think that receptionist should get her @$$ fired. If we misunderstand the doctor's directions that could have serious effects our health. Some of us have serious medical problems and we have a right to proper communication and treatment.

What is it about you hearies and oralists who think we're less than human?
 

Angel

♥"Concrete Angel"♥
Premium Member
I would think that the receptionist would be the one chosen to weed people out. We would need to know the whole story before we could offer any advice. How often do you go to the doctor and demand an interpreter??

Share the details.

Lantana


Does it matter how often she goes and demand an interpreter? The whole point is she asked for an interpreter when she called to make an appointment, they fail to provide her an interpreter, so instead of her cancel the appointment since she was already there, she used a paper and pen to communicate back and fourth, but the receptionist took it away and torned it up and made her set up another appointment.
 

lilylover72

I love purple!
Premium Member
Luica, I am sorry that you had problem with doctor. I had problem with doctor that I saw because I was so sick. He refuse write a note that I asked. He wanted my son to sign but he was only 8 years old. I told dr to not make my son to sign because he cannot help us. Dr kept speak that I could not understand. I said WRITE! he finally wrote. I didn't like him. I report and against him through headquater office. A lady said she was very sorry that dr treated me bad. She gave me money back. I told her that I will never want see him again. Sigh
 

Kaitin

New Member
Luica, I am sorry that you had problem with doctor. I had problem with doctor that I saw because I was so sick. He refuse write a note that I asked. He wanted my son to sign but he was only 8 years old. I told dr to not make my son to sign because he cannot help us. Dr kept speak that I could not understand. I said WRITE! he finally wrote. I didn't like him. I report and against him through headquater office. A lady said she was very sorry that dr treated me bad. She gave me money back. I told her that I will never want see him again. Sigh

:applause:

Sorry you had problem with the doctor but good job with the money back and reporting! Maybe the doctor is better with the next patient because of your work.
 

Relay_Services

New Member
must make “reasonable accommodations” to ensure “effective communication” with to the deaf and people with other disabilities.

The most effective means for us to communicate would be to use a professional interpreter.

I completely agree that it is outrageous for them to tear up your paper.

When the doctor gets an interpreter, is he paying for it? If so, isn't it reasonable for one not to want to pay for an interpreter out of their pocket? They would probably be losing money on the doctor visit. Even if there is a law, someone losing money is going to create conflict.

Why wouldn't using a pen and paper, or even typing on a sidekick be a reasonable method of communication? Of course this was attempted, and they tore it up, but it sounds like most deaf people would not accept this method, and there HAS to be your preferred method, an interpreter. The law says they need to make reasonable accommodations, not whatever is preferred.

Do you think you understand the medical terminology via pen and pad? I highly don't think so.

I went to a new dentist once. I couldn't understand a single word he was saying. I am convinced he didn't even know English. Is he responsible for hiring a Chinese to English translator?

If an ASL translator is not provided, what is making you so angry? Is it that you feel discriminated against, or is it the fact that they are trying to break that law? If I am unable to understand my doctor because of a language barrier I may be a little frustrated, but I move on and look for another doctor. A doctor is still a business, I understand that they are not obligated to make my life happier, especially at their expense.

What if your doctor provides you an ASL translator, but he only speaks a very little bit of English and you are not able to effectively communicate with him. Even though you have not been able to communicate, did he fulfill his translator requirement?

What happens when someone requests a translator, but they are living in a very remote area, such as Alaska. If there is not one available in the surrounding area, wouldn't it then not be a reasonable accommodation?

Some people say being deaf is a disability, and some say that it is not. Do the people who say it is not a disability still argue that they need a translator to be provided because of the ADA?

I don't mean to offend anyone, please read my signature. I am only trying to gain a greater understanding through debate. :)
 

LuciaDisturbed

New Member
I would think that the receptionist would be the one chosen to weed people out. We would need to know the whole story before we could offer any advice. How often do you go to the doctor and demand an interpreter??

Share the details.

Lantana

I called the doctor's office two months beforehand and asked for an interpreter and they agreed to provide one. Then when I arrived there, I found out they never got an interpreter. They said they will not provide one. I then offered to write back and forth with pen and paper, as I needed to see the doctor. They refused and was very rude about it.

What else do you want to know, Lantana?
 

LuciaDisturbed

New Member
Does it matter how often she goes and demand an interpreter? The whole point is she asked for an interpreter when she called to make an appointment, they fail to provide her an interpreter, so instead of her cancel the appointment since she was already there, she used a paper and pen to communicate back and fourth, but the receptionist took it away and torned it up and made her set up another appointment.

Actually, the receptionist wouldn't even let me set up a new appointment, she didn't even want to have me at the clinic as an patient at all.
 

ideafspy

New Member
You can explain to them what I learn from my previous interpreter and it work most of the time...

You can ask them, do they provide the ramp for wheelchair.

They will say yes, ask them because it require to service for them accessible to visit doctor?

Interpreter is their vest protective to avoid any misunderstand. If anything cause or anything that you aren't aware. You have key to sue them because by the law. The law say that we are not allow to bring interpreter to any doctor or hospital from ourselves.

The link, SLRSinc.com || Frequently Asked Questions about SLRS are answer their question or why its require.

Other useful information; Rights of Deaf And Hard of Hearing Under the ADA | DEAF-INFO

Do San Antonio, I remember Garner Middle School have VR Sign something.. it been while back of my young age.

I have that problem sometime for my pain issue which I don't like intake Oxycodone! Reason, I misunderstood what doctor say about that kind of another pill and that I went to store and bring home.. I took out the pill bag, so... I have follow up this week with interpreter this time...

Hope thing went well


Actually, the receptionist wouldn't even let me set up a new appointment, she didn't even want to have me at the clinic as an patient at all.
 

Reba

Retired Terp
Premium Member
You might be interested to know:

Q. Are businesses entitled to any tax benefit to help pay for the cost of compliance?

A. As amended in 1990, the Internal Revenue Code allows a deduction of up to $15,000 per year for expenses associated with the removal of qualified architectural and transportation barriers. The 1990 amendment also permits eligible small businesses to receive a tax credit for certain costs of compliance with the ADA. An eligible small business is one whose gross receipts do not exceed $1,000,000 or whose workforce does not consist of more than 30 full-time workers. Qualifying businesses may claim a credit of up to 50 percent of eligible access expenditures that exceed $250 but do not exceed $10,250. Examples of eligible access expenditures include the necessary and reasonable costs of removing architectural, physical, communications, and transportation barriers; providing readers, interpreters, and other auxiliary aids; and acquiring or modifying equipment or devices.
Americans with Disabilities Act Questions and Answers
 

SxyPorkie

New Member
was the presribe for refilling Vicodins ? if thats true thats probably why they dont want refilling your sribes ?


Whoa... It is none of your business to know the name of meds Lucia is taking... she did mentioned that she needed refills of meds... SO BE IT...
 
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