Did you use an interpreter to take your driver's test?

Lysander

Well-Known Member
I'm surprised that they would do this. How are they to know that the interpreter isn't giving the answers to the person who is testing. You'd think it would be easier to just translate the test and then offer the test in different languages. Same with ASL. They could use video questions. When I took my driver's test, some odd a;sljdgfa;oligh;e years ago, they were super strict about it.
 

DeafDucky

Well-Known Member
In all the years of taking drivers tests, getting new ones in new states I've only had to take the written part twice. 1st as a new driver then once in a state I moved to in 2003. Neither time I used an interpreter. I have always said I was deaf to whoever was renewing my DL.

The bigger problem for me was my @$%) vision lol. Almost EVERY time I went to get a new license in a new state, they make me do that road sign test thing with the 'binocular machine'. Insanely tiny... and I fail every time... "go get a letter from your eye doctor"- oh and it HAS to be from a doctor IN OUR STATE! (learned that the hard way in SC). Without fail though every doctor looks at me like I have two heads and sign the thing wondering why they made me do so lol. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯.
 

AmputeeOT

Active Member
I'm surprised that they would do this. How are they to know that the interpreter isn't giving the answers to the person who is testing. You'd think it would be easier to just translate the test and then offer the test in different languages. Same with ASL. They could use video questions. When I took my driver's test, some odd a;sljdgfa;oligh;e years ago, they were super strict about it.

Because by law they aren't allowed to give the answers.

Just like... if a Deaf person goes to a job interview, how do you know the interpreter isn't just giving the potential employer the best answers, despite what the Deaf person says? How do you know an interpreter isn't giving the best answers in front of a judge in a legal case? How do you know thew interpreter isn't just giving the answers for a verbal exam? How do you know an interpreter won't steal a Deaf person's identity when they give relevant personal info that could be used in that manner.

Because - If they are a certified interpreter they are required to follow rules and laws.

And yep, interpreters are allowed for written portions of the driver's test.
 

Lysander

Well-Known Member
Because by law they aren't allowed to give the answers.

Just like... if a Deaf person goes to a job interview, how do you know the interpreter isn't just giving the potential employer the best answers, despite what the Deaf person says? How do you know an interpreter isn't giving the best answers in front of a judge in a legal case? How do you know thew interpreter isn't just giving the answers for a verbal exam? How do you know an interpreter won't steal a Deaf person's identity when they give relevant personal info that could be used in that manner.

Because - If they are a certified interpreter they are required to follow rules and laws.

And yep, interpreters are allowed for written portions of the driver's test.

I understand that. But what the law/ethics are and what people do are two completely different things. I'm technically not legally allowed to discuss my patients with other people. That doesn't mean that I couldn't break the law and do it anyway. There would be repercussions, but it could still happen.

This seems like it would fall under the jurisdiction of the ADA. I can see it being a requirement the more that I think about it. Maybe not so much for non-English speakers, but for the Deaf and HoH it seems like it would.
 

Barbaro

Well-Known Member
The part I'm asking about specifically is the written test. Did you, or anyone you know, use an interpreter for the questions on the written or computer kiosk test?

What got me thinking about this was:

http://www.gctelegram.com/81607258-aa38-50c0-8077-3d6d7520069e.html

That's weird. I never took drivers education class, because I went to my private school overseas. When I moved back to the states, I knew I had to learn to drive. I signed up for driver's permit and had to drive with an adult- 21 years old and up. I studied the instruction book DMV gave out for free. Spanish in a instruction book is available. Anyone can also take written questions test in Spanish, too. They're available. I never needed a terp for written questions and driver's test. My relatives from countries never needed a terp for both tests.

I'm very much believer in both written question and driving tests, because during the driving skill test, they observe your driving skill. If you don't look over your shoulder for a blind spot, you fail. If you make a small mistake during the driving test, you will have to start over all again. That's how it works in California. I wish driving test is mandatory in Texas. All you need is pass the written test and receive a license. What a joke. I'd rather foreigners practicing their driving skills than written test. Driving skill test is very much different from written test.
 

SilverRoxy

Deaf/ASL user
Premium Member
I asked few of my friends who writes in ASL sentence structure if they used an interpreter for the written part of Driver's license test. They said yes. It is legal in New York State.
 

Calvin

In Hazzard County
Super Moderator
Premium Member
I once took drivers ed class in high school and had interpreter interpret in classroom. While driving, the instructor used hand signal/gesture to tell me where to go or what to do (switch lanes, turn left etc). For the drivers test at DMV or DOT place, I passed the written test and got the drivers license.

When I lived in Texas over 20 years ago, I had my first DL, they used the computer for the drivers test if I recall correctly, it comes with pictures or animated video with the multiple choice answers. I don't know if it's still used today, when I moved to California... I took written test with multiple choices. Don't know if they still use computer for drivers test.
 

Barbaro

Well-Known Member
I once took drivers ed class in high school and had interpreter interpret in classroom. While driving, the instructor used hand signal/gesture to tell me where to go or what to do (switch lanes, turn left etc). For the drivers test at DMV or DOT place, I passed the written test and got the drivers license.

When I lived in Texas over 20 years ago, I had my first DL, they used the computer for the drivers test if I recall correctly, it comes with pictures or animated video with the multiple choice answers. I don't know if it's still used today, when I moved to California... I took written test with multiple choices. Don't know if they still use computer for drivers test.

When I moved to Texas, I didn't have to take a written test as long as my out of state DL was valid. I passed vision exam. I can't believe how easy it was when I received my Texas DL for the first time.

I don't see any computers at DMV locations in Dallas and San Antonio except I saw them answering on the papers. I could have been mistaken.

I can confirm that in CA, they still do written test with multiple choices and driving test. Last year, my father was required to take both written test with multiple choice, and driving test because he was 90 years old. He passed them.
 

Calvin

In Hazzard County
Super Moderator
Premium Member
When I moved to Texas, I didn't have to take a written test as long as my out of state DL was valid. I passed vision exam. I can't believe how easy it was when I received my Texas DL for the first time.

I don't see any computers at DMV locations in Dallas and San Antonio except I saw them answering on the papers. I could have been mistaken.

I can confirm that in CA, they still do written test with multiple choices and driving test. Last year, my father was required to take both written test with multiple choice, and driving test because he was 90 years old. He passed them.

Yes my first DL was in Texas and the test was very easy and passed on the first try. The last time I renewed in California, I had to take vision test, no written test. Passed and got the renewal DL in the mail.

I have not seen any computer tests in my area, maybe it's in another room in the building. No idea, never asked since I have not taken written test since I moved here from Texas.
 

Foxrac

Well-Known Member
Premium Member
I passed the written test in 2004 and passed the road test in 2005 without interpreter but my driving teacher took us to courthouse for written test and interpreted about what vision test says and explained about direction on written test so no answer given.
 

AmputeeOT

Active Member
I understand that. But what the law/ethics are and what people do are two completely different things. I'm technically not legally allowed to discuss my patients with other people. That doesn't mean that I couldn't break the law and do it anyway. There would be repercussions, but it could still happen.

This seems like it would fall under the jurisdiction of the ADA. I can see it being a requirement the more that I think about it. Maybe not so much for non-English speakers, but for the Deaf and HoH it seems like it would.

Good point but yes, this does fall under the jurisdiction of the ADA.

People have actually tried to use the excuse of "but the terp could give away the answers" as a reason to deny people accomodations before. Or to deny giving Deaf people info over the phone because "the terp being involved violates HIPPA"
 

Lysander

Well-Known Member
Wouldn't the terp then be bound by HIPAA since they are receiving medical information in a professional capacity? I see your point better now though. That seems like such a gray area as far as the law goes though. I know that as a medical professional I am bound by HIPAA, but is the terp technically bound by HIPAA or are they bound by their own personal ethics. I imagine there is an ethical standard for terps, but are they legally bound like I am? Interesting.
 

DeafDucky

Well-Known Member
If you don't look over your shoulder for a blind spot, you fail. If you make a small mistake during the driving test, you will have to start over all again. That's how it works in California.

Oh lord how true that is. I failed my driver's test more than once, at least one for a huge mistake and one for a really really REALLY stupid tiny mistake.

I also know that now more and more driver's tests are done out on the roadways around the examination location. The test(s) I took was within an enclosed course that included some of the things needed- 3 point turn, crosswalk stop... I've forgotten what else.

As for driver's ed.. yes I took that in HS but no interpreter as I was mainstream and oral...
 

Reba

Retired Terp
Premium Member
Wouldn't the terp then be bound by HIPAA since they are receiving medical information in a professional capacity? I see your point better now though. That seems like such a gray area as far as the law goes though. I know that as a medical professional I am bound by HIPAA, but is the terp technically bound by HIPAA or are they bound by their own personal ethics. I imagine there is an ethical standard for terps, but are they legally bound like I am? Interesting.
Interpreters must follow HIPAA and the professional code of ethics for interpreters both. Some medical facilities require the terp to sign a HIPAA confidentiality form. If the terp violates confidentiality, he or she can be reported to NAD, RID, the state certification board, the terp's employer or all of the above for disciplinary action. It's a serious thing.
 

Reba

Retired Terp
Premium Member
Good point but yes, this does fall under the jurisdiction of the ADA.

People have actually tried to use the excuse of "but the terp could give away the answers" as a reason to deny people accomodations before. Or to deny giving Deaf people info over the phone because "the terp being involved violates HIPPA"
Yes, lame-o excuses by those who either don't understand the interpreting process or are just trying to avoid the expense of hiring a professional interpreter.
 
Top