Deaf Wanna-Be's

TXgolfer

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For example, in N. Cal, at the softball parks there are many deaf people....we don't huddle together., we mingle and drink excessively with everyone.
 

dogmom

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oh, I missed some posts

but- answering - <if mixed group is open to non-fluent ASL person joining in> I'd likely attempt to interact with mixed group first. If the conversation involves dogs at one or other group, I'd check that out too.
Never been to a party where that's happened but i think i could see it happening.
i have been in mixed groups that are of hearing non-signers and variations of deaf/Deaf and signers.
 

BecLak

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You're not. He is, culture is not bound by country.

So true that culture is not bound by country - culture is a mindset, distinct language, customs, etiquette, and common characteristics etc that are unique to one particular people group or community. Deaf definitely has cultural identity.
 

ambrosia

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Okay exactly what customs and etiquette do the Deaf have that are different from the hearing in the same region?
 

BecLak

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You asked a damn good question. :ugh3:

In my experience, Deaf and Hearing at a social gathering more often than not end up in separate groups. It's rare to see Hearing make the effort to mingle with Deaf if there are other Hearing around, and visa-versa. However, deaf who don't identify with Deaf Culture, mingle between the two.
 

BecLak

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Okay exactly what customs and etiquette do the Deaf have that are different from the hearing in the same region?

Manner of greeting and farewell.
Interaction in conversation
Body language
Social etiquette - what is rude and what isn't

To list specifically would take a whole new thread. - you can see a lot of it in the threads about how Hearies irk us.
 

TXgolfer

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Manner of greeting and farewell.
Interaction in conversation
Body language
Social etiquette - what is rude and what isn't

To list specifically would take a whole new thread. - you can see a lot of it in the threads about how Hearies irk us.

That is quite a reach. I guess every group is a culture then.
 

ambrosia

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Manner of greeting and farewell.
Interaction in conversation
Body language
Social etiquette - what is rude and what isn't

To list specifically would take a whole new thread. - you can see a lot of it in the threads about how Hearies irk us.

Okay that def wasn't an exactly, I was looking for examples. For instance, I've been in the "hearing world", or I as I call it, the world, for my whole life soooo I'll give you some examples.

Hearing people's manner of greeting and saying good bye is dependent on the relationship of the parties. Hugs and kisses for close friends and family, handshakes for strangers and people you just met, sometimes high fives and fist bumps for pals, especially for guys, and they do the half hug shoulder pound with other males.

They tend to like to look at the people were talking to, though they can talk to each other from another room, but that can be considered rude. They generally take turns speaking.

Obviously there is going to be more body language involved with the deaf just because that can give what you are "saying" meaning. But body language is certainly an important aspect of the hearing interactions. They do take cues from body language, and it is after all a phrase that exists in every because is it something everyone uses.

Well, it's considered to rude to do things like interupt someone who is talking, farting and burping in front of people, chewing with your mouth open, picking your nose etc etc.

Any of that different from the Deaf?
 

Bottesini

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Okay that def wasn't an exactly, I was looking for examples. For instance, I've been in the "hearing world", or I as I call it, the world, for my whole life soooo I'll give you some examples.

Hearing people's manner of greeting and saying good bye is dependent on the relationship of the parties. Hugs and kisses for close friends and family, handshakes for strangers and people you just met, sometimes high fives and fist bumps for pals, especially for guys, and they do the half hug shoulder pound with other males.

They tend to like to look at the people were talking to, though they can talk to each other from another room, but that can be considered rude. They generally take turns speaking.

Obviously there is going to be more body language involved with the deaf just because that can give what you are "saying" meaning. But body language is certainly an important aspect of the hearing interactions. They do take cues from body language, and it is after all a phrase that exists in every because is it something everyone uses.

Well, it's considered to rude to do things like interupt someone who is talking, farting and burping in front of people, chewing with your mouth open, picking your nose etc etc.

Any of that different from the Deaf?

About American Deaf Culture

Here is a link from Gallaudet . Not only on the page linked , but all over the site there you and everyone else reading here can learn a great deal about what comprises deaf culture if you are truly interested.
 

ambrosia

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About American Deaf Culture

Here is a link from Gallaudet . Not only on the page linked , but all over the site there you and everyone else reading here can learn a great deal about what comprises deaf culture if you are truly interested.

Oh I am thank you. :D

I don't know, that's a pretty limited list of values, behaviors and traditions to distinguish themselves from the hearing. It's basically all about being deaf, and rights of the deaf. I am still unconvinced. Not that it matters what I think, I'm just one person in billions.

Why do the deaf think taking turns in a conversation is a deaf social norm?? They don't think hearing people do that?
 

TXgolfer

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About American Deaf Culture

Here is a link from Gallaudet . Not only on the page linked , but all over the site there you and everyone else reading here can learn a great deal about what comprises deaf culture if you are truly interested.

I have read this before. I don't really agree with it. I believe "deaf culture" is a really just a large clique. Not that there is anything wrong with that.
 

Lau2046

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Italians have a culture (and country and so on) in Italy. But would you classify an Italian raised in America an Italian, an American, or an Italian-American?

Italian...100% Italian....but you'd have to know them to get this...no Italian American says they're Italian American...we say "Italian" or "Sicilian." Although no self respecting Sicilian ever refers to him/herself as "Italian."

Laura
 

ambrosia

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Italian...100% Italian....but you'd have to know them to get this...no Italian American says they're Italian American...we say "Italian" or "Sicilian." Although no self respecting Sicilian ever refers to him/herself as "Italian."

Laura

I worked with a black woman in her early 40's who hated the term African American. She'd say "I'm not African, I'm American who happens to be black." You got to wonder to about black Americans that are from Jamiaca, Haiti.....

I guess I don't understand why everyone wants to label themselves and separate themselves more from others.
 

TXgolfer

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I worked with a black woman in her early 40's who hated the term African American. She'd say "I'm not African, I'm American who happens to be black." You got to wonder to about black Americans that are from Jamiaca, Haiti.....

I guess I don't understand why everyone wants to label themselves and separate themselves more from others.

Reminds me of back in the Natalie Holloway days, a reporter (Greta, I think) referred to the black Aruban prison guards as "African American" :lol:
 

naisho

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Italian...100% Italian....but you'd have to know them to get this...no Italian American says they're Italian American...we say "Italian" or "Sicilian." Although no self respecting Sicilian ever refers to him/herself as "Italian."

Laura

How come they call it italoamericani in Italian?
What's interesting is that they have a full wikipedia page dedicated to it.. Italoamericani - Wikipedia

Edit: I found the English version here: Italian American - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
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naisho

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I guess I don't understand why everyone wants to label themselves and separate themselves more from others.
Maybe it would help if you could stand in the shoes of a minority in the first place.

I'm not sure, I feel like I see it differently. It may be due to formality titles. Or clarification themes. Nearly all Asians I have met who identify as American generally prefer the -American addition. Because, from our upbringing as Americans. When people generally say "Asian", most people consider those as the folks from overseas, which especially has different cultural perspectives than ours.

I suppose it may be because most non-Hispanic Whites are used to being classified as American by default.
Everyone else who is not "Asian' see/believe you are "Asian".
The real asians (who are authentically first generation in Asian countries) automatically recognize your culture and believe you are "American".


So, the Asian-Americans took a different path to identify ourselves. I'm not sure if this is true for "Italian"(Americans), I assume it would but it looks like I could be wrong if some disagree. BTW, I'm not referring to the Census definitions, either.
 
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