anyone here have a hearing dog?

tigersharkdude

New Member
I was just wondering if anybody here has a hearing dog (animal)?

I went to see my audi the other day and low and behold I am stone deaf :(
She recommended that I get a hearing dog to "hear" things for me. Any opinions?
 

whatdidyousay!

Well-Known Member
I had a hearing dog from NEADS and he dies of cancer. :(
I called NEADS and was told it was a 3 years waiting period to get another dog. I found out the waiting time can be be 3-5 years to get another hearing
dog! I really found miss my beloved Finlay and felt lost without him, he helped me a lot. I did not want to wait so long to get another dog so I got a a mini poodle mix, I think he is part Terrier. I am having some trainers start working with Marty and me soon. If you do not want to wait so long ,try to find a trainer to go to a shelter with them and find the right dog for you.
 

Beach girl

Active Member
If you like dogs, I think it's a great solution. I have two poodles. They are not officially hearing assistance dogs, but they do bark when someone rings the doorbell, so that's useful.

Pippin also barks a lot when he hears thunder, which is not so useful. ;-/
 

drphil

Active Member
I am unaware if a "stone deaf" person uses a "hearing dog". Usually associate the dogs to the use by "blind persons". I did meet at Sunnybrook/Toronto a couple of years ago a person using a Hearing dog that had a Cochlear Implant. She had the Implant operation a short time before me. According to her- was she assisted.

Implanted A B Harmony activated Aug/07
 

dereksbicycles

Active Member
My rottweiler does fine as a hearing ear dog. He has not been trained for it, but he knows to bark and let me know when people are at the door. That is my second rottweiler. My parents are on their second standard poodle. They do make good hearing ear dogs too. None of our dogs were trained for that job. They know.
 

drphil

Active Member
I guess one advantage of having a dog as a pet vs say a cat. Reacts to persons knocking at the door.
I understand that "hearing dogs" are trained to assist persons however how much to "deaf/Deaf" persons probably highly specific to individuals. Does the shortage of trained dogs have an impact on the potential clients?

Implanted A B Harmony activated Aug/07
 

Beach girl

Active Member
In another thread we were talking about the organization "Paws with a Cause," based in Michigan, which trains dogs to be hearing ear dogs. It takes about 1 1/2 to 2 years to train a dog to the appropriate level. The first part of the training is standard obedience, done by individual foster-families. After the dog completes that part of the training, it goes back to their headquarters for the specialized training. '

(Hearing assistance is only one thing the organization does; they also train dogs to assist people in wheelchairs and other types of assistance.)

Once they start the hearing-assistance training, they do basic things like train the dog to go get the person if it hears a doorbell, a ringing phone, the "beep" of a microwave, an alarm clock, and other things. At this point it begins to be specialized depending on the person's needs. A young mother might want the dog to react to hearing a baby cry, in person or on the baby monitor. An older person in a wheelchair might need the dog to bring things (like a ringing cellphone) as well as react to the sound.

It's a fascinating process. Exactly how long the specialized training lasts depends on the situation and how much it has to learn.

Generally a person has to wait a while before a dog is ready for him. Once in a while there are situations where a dog is placed and then doesn't work out with the person, for whatever reason, and then it's returned and could be placed elsewhere fairly quickly. But usually there is a wait.

Plus, they will not place a dog if you already have a dog under 10 years old, nor will they train your own dog.
 

LoveBlue

Well-Known Member
I guess one advantage of having a dog as a pet vs say a cat. Reacts to persons knocking at the door.
I understand that "hearing dogs" are trained to assist persons however how much to "deaf/Deaf" persons probably highly specific to individuals. Does the shortage of trained dogs have an impact on the potential clients?

Implanted A B Harmony activated Aug/07
My cats react to noises (people at door, etc) and if they happen to be in my "view", I'll notice and then look to where they're looking. Heck, they've told me when my alarm was going off.

Maybe you need to pay more attention to Prof Sky. Your not giving him/her enough credit.
 

drphil

Active Member
I am not usually in living room but thanks to my Implant have heard persons knock at the door from other parts of the house. Surprised me.

Prof SKY is a female and so far hasn't come to me re: persons at the front door. Perhaps a real slacker but with a nice meow-anyways.

Implanted A B Harmony activated Aug/07
 

jillio

New Member
If you like dogs, I think it's a great solution. I have two poodles. They are not officially hearing assistance dogs, but they do bark when someone rings the doorbell, so that's useful.

Pippin also barks a lot when he hears thunder, which is not so useful. ;-/

Agreed. I recommend service dogs for many of my clients, and have written letters to landlords that refuse animals that this is a treatment recommendation based on my client's diagnosis, and is allowable under the ADA as accommodation. They are helpful in many instances, including reducing panic attacks. In the case of mental disorders, they are not known as service dogs, but rather therapeutic animals, but purpose is the same. Assistance to the individual.
 

jillio

New Member
My cats react to noises (people at door, etc) and if they happen to be in my "view", I'll notice and then look to where they're looking. Heck, they've told me when my alarm was going off.

Maybe you need to pay more attention to Prof Sky. Your not giving him/her enough credit.

No doubt. Animals are very reactive, whether a cat, a dog, or even a bird. One just has to learn to read the messages they send to us.
 

dogmom

Well-Known Member
for a time I volunteered as a trainer with an organization that trains service dogs - the focus was on assistance/mobility needs with this group and a few cross-trained dogs. We'd go to malls and stuff and work the dogs in scenarios like food court, elevator etc. Usually at least one of us was in a chair w/dog pulling.

one of my friends who happens to be Deaf has been considering a signal alert dog since the loss of her pet dogs and wondered if I could help train a dog she might adopt. I replied I'd be happy to assist w/general behavioral things but am not qualified to formally teach a hearing dog and/or a team <client & dog> from beginning to end....gave her referral for another local trainer some years my senior who signs and advertises her experience with service dogs.

I have taught my older Rottie <3 yrs> to open and close cabinets/doors, fridge; she'll help my hubby pull off his coat <grab a sleeve in her mouth and pull>. She'll also pick up some things I have worked with her on - gloves, hat, socks, her collar, soda can in drink holder, some utensils...behaviors not "proofed" or formal.

The baby <Rottie> is beginning to learn about opening and closing doors.
 

pek1

New Member
In another thread we were talking about the organization "Paws with a Cause," based in Michigan, which trains dogs to be hearing ear dogs. It takes about 1 1/2 to 2 years to train a dog to the appropriate level. The first part of the training is standard obedience, done by individual foster-families. After the dog completes that part of the training, it goes back to their headquarters for the specialized training. '

(Hearing assistance is only one thing the organization does; they also train dogs to assist people in wheelchairs and other types of assistance.)

Once they start the hearing-assistance training, they do basic things like train the dog to go get the person if it hears a doorbell, a ringing phone, the "beep" of a microwave, an alarm clock, and other things. At this point it begins to be specialized depending on the person's needs. A young mother might want the dog to react to hearing a baby cry, in person or on the baby monitor. An older person in a wheelchair might need the dog to bring things (like a ringing cellphone) as well as react to the sound.

It's a fascinating process. Exactly how long the specialized training lasts depends on the situation and how much it has to learn.

Generally a person has to wait a while before a dog is ready for him. Once in a while there are situations where a dog is placed and then doesn't work out with the person, for whatever reason, and then it's returned and could be placed elsewhere fairly quickly. But usually there is a wait.

Plus, they will not place a dog if you already have a dog under 10 years old, nor will they train your own dog.

tigersharkdude,

I haven't been here for a long while, but if you take a look in the archives under my name, you will find that not only do I advocate Hearing Dogs and own one, but also trained my own. I do NOT recommend going through an agency to obtain a HD, as there is a slew of information on the internet on how to train your own. Many people are uninformed when it comes to Hearing Dogs and requirements, as well as the education and training for such.

My Hearing Dog, Snickers, is now 11 years old and is still accompanying me in public. I am in the market for another one so that she can train him/her, as she has already trained one other Service Dog. I'm quite proud of her and pleased with my results in training her.
 
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