Accomddations for the d/Deaf should be made more visible

BecLak

Well-Known Member
To raise more awareness, accomodations for the d/Deaf should be made more visible. Re: Braille on the elevator/lift buttons for the Blind. Signs should be displayed more visibly showing accomodations for the d/Deaf, just like there are signs for Free Wireless Internet etc. I know there are some around but not that much from what I have seen in my travels.

Any ideas anyone?
 

GrendelQ

41°17′00″N 70°04′58″W
Premium Member
Beclak, this is a really good idea. I always notice deaf-friendly accommodations for events and programs (conferences, at the theater), but never know about general access. What type of fixed or standing accommodations would this entail (so much of the accommodation I know about is customized to the individual and requested as needed, like CART and ASL interpreters, rather than just being in place permanently, like FM systems/ loops?) What types of deaf-related services have you seen made visible in a way that worked?
 

BecLak

Well-Known Member
Beclak, this is a really good idea. I always notice deaf-friendly accommodations for events and programs (conferences, at the theater), but never know about general access. What type of fixed or standing accommodations would this entail (so much of the accommodation I know about is customized to the individual and requested as needed, like CART and ASL interpreters, rather than just being in place permanently, like FM systems/ loops?) What types of deaf-related services have you seen made visible in a way that worked?

One would be Sign Language used with News Broadcasts. This could be expanded to Sign Language announcements, specifications of rules and regulations in video etc.

A Deaf-friendly sign on shops and drive-throughs specifying that the staff in the shop have been educated to accomodate the Deaf.

(Maybe the US has these accomodations already but Australia doesn't just yet that I am aware of).
 
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Hohtopics

New Member
Sometime some of the deaf people just like the feeling that they're "just one of the guys". And don't necessarily always want to be reminded of their deafness or have everything to do with just the deaf. And that they may just perceive themselves to be a "person first who just happens to have an hearing loss" rather than expanding or exaggerating their deaf identity and live in a "deaf this or deaf that..." sense like the way some of the deaf people do. Just my 2 cents.
 

Banjo

Expelled
Premium Member
One thing they could improve is the accessibility at train and bus stations. God knows how many times I've had to ask people if this was the right one to go on or not. They don't always tell you what platform it is on, and sometimes on the sign it is outdated information.
 

GrendelQ

41°17′00″N 70°04′58″W
Premium Member
Sometime some of the deaf people just like the feeling that they're "just one of the guys". And don't necessarily always want to be reminded of their deafness or have everything to do with just the deaf. And that they may just perceive themselves to be a "person first who just happens to have an hearing loss" rather than expanding or exaggerating their deaf identity and live in a "deaf this or deaf that..." sense like the way some of the deaf people do. Just my 2 cents.

That may be true, although for some, like my daughter, deafness permeates so much of her life (her means of communication, her educational environment, her daily routines). And I think of how amazing it would be for my daughter to turn on the television and find people communicating with each other and to the audience in sign, or wearing HAs and CIs. We had her backstage at a rock concert at an enormous stadium last year (my husband was roommates with the lead singer when we first met, so we get very lucky when the band comes to Boston or NY) -- and all the band members had earpieces. Li-Li exploded with excitement -- I couldn't hear her yelling over the music, but I could see her signing to me from a distance across the stage that they were just like her, they all had CIs!!! There's a great deal to be said for finding commonalities with both peers and rockstars of all sorts in the world who are deaf, and I'd like to make certain they have a great deal of visibility in her life.
 

BecLak

Well-Known Member
One thing they could improve is the accessibility at train and bus stations. God knows how many times I've had to ask people if this was the right one to go on or not. They don't always tell you what platform it is on, and sometimes on the sign it is outdated information.

Good point Banjo. Thanks for the idea. :D
 

jillio

New Member
One would be Sign Language used with News Broadcasts. This could be expanded to Sign Language announcements, specifications of rules and regulations in video etc.

A Deaf-friendly sign on shops and drive-throughs specifying that the staff in the shop have been educated to accomodate the Deaf.

(Maybe the US has these accomodations already but Australia doesn't just yet that I am aware of).

Depending on the business, there are some that make their accommodations known in ways such as a sign that states that interpreters are available, etc. I find that those are mostly social service agencies, though, and the practice is not standardized.

Good thread! This is a topic that should be discussed and ideas used for advocacy.
 

Reba

Retired Terp
Premium Member
One thing they could improve is the accessibility at train and bus stations. God knows how many times I've had to ask people if this was the right one to go on or not. They don't always tell you what platform it is on, and sometimes on the sign it is outdated information.
Good point. Existing "services" need to be kept up to date and functioning properly. What's the point in saying services or accommodations are available if they aren't maintained or actually provided?
 

Reba

Retired Terp
Premium Member
Hospitals and doctors' offices need to be more proactive in providing interpreter services for patients. Deaf patients shouldn't have to beg for interpreting services. At the time each appointment is made, if the receptionist knows that the patient is deaf, then interpreting services should be offered. That, in addition to signage that states "Sign Language Interpreters Available Upon Request" should be done.

Most of the hospitals and social service agencies in my area do that. It's the private doctors' offices and specialty clinics that are a struggle.

If businesses do post "Deaf Friendly" signs, then they need to be sure to back up what they say. That is, depending on the kind of business, be sure to actually have signing employees, availability of terps, or employees who are educated in how to behave in an intelligent and courtesy manner with deaf customers. Don't post the sign unless you mean it.
 

BecLak

Well-Known Member
Australia (well, WA) seems to have very little support for the deaf. :aw:

Yes, we Aussies have a long way to go. But Melbourne is pretty good from what I have observed, most of the resources come from there. Perhaps due to a larger Deaf population.
 

BecLak

Well-Known Member
Hospitals and doctors' offices need to be more proactive in providing interpreter services for patients. Deaf patients shouldn't have to beg for interpreting services. At the time each appointment is made, if the receptionist knows that the patient is deaf, then interpreting services should be offered. That, in addition to signage that states "Sign Language Interpreters Available Upon Request" should be done.

Most of the hospitals and social service agencies in my area do that. It's the private doctors' offices and specialty clinics that are a struggle.

If businesses do post "Deaf Friendly" signs, then they need to be sure to back up what they say. That is, depending on the kind of business, be sure to actually have signing employees, availability of terps, or employees who are educated in how to behave in an intelligent and courtesy manner with deaf customers. Don't post the sign unless you mean it.

Good post :)
 

BecLak

Well-Known Member
Depending on the business, there are some that make their accommodations known in ways such as a sign that states that interpreters are available, etc. I find that those are mostly social service agencies, though, and the practice is not standardized.

Good thread! This is a topic that should be discussed and ideas used for advocacy.

:ty:
 

Frisky Feline

Well-Known Member
One thing they could improve is the accessibility at train and bus stations. God knows how many times I've had to ask people if this was the right one to go on or not. They don't always tell you what platform it is on, and sometimes on the sign it is outdated information.

I agree! I almost miss the train recently. sheesh, It would be great if there does add the outdoor light signs by the train platforms.
 

Beowulf

Well-Known Member
Premium Member
I agree! I almost miss the train recently. sheesh, It would be great if there does add the outdoor light signs by the train platforms.

That would be great, but it costs money to do that. In these economic times, they would probably consider those frivolous.
 

somedeafdudefromPNW

Active Member
Wirelessly posted

Sounds like you're working things out regarding your own identity, HHissue. If you truly see yourself as a person with a hearing loss, without offering suggestions to help society as a whole rather than yourself, why are you rocking the boat unless you're unsure of yourself? May I suggest seeing a counseller?



Frankly, the general hearing loss population is in no danger of Deaf awareness. After all, only one million or so people knows ASL, oppose to 30 million with a hearing loss. Why do you view Deaf culture as a threat to your being? You are in the majority.
 
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Banjo

Expelled
Premium Member
Sometime some of the deaf people just like the feeling that they're "just one of the guys". And don't necessarily always want to be reminded of their deafness or have everything to do with just the deaf. And that they may just perceive themselves to be a "person first who just happens to have an hearing loss" rather than expanding or exaggerating their deaf identity and live in a "deaf this or deaf that..." sense like the way some of the deaf people do. Just my 2 cents.

You clearly have self-esteem issues if it's such a bother to be reminded of your hearing loss.
 
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