Yesterday at the post office ...

Liebling:-)))

Sussi *7.7.86 - 18.6.09*
Premium Member
It's protected under the ADA.

What do you mean?

Do you mean that it´s obligation for deaf people have hearing dog´s assistance for go in any stores including Post Office? (Accord my simple question at post #58).
 

Hear Again

New Member
[
Spend a day with a blind person you would be surprised how well they are able to get around. Just because they are blind doesnt mean they cant get around well. Guide dogs help them get around at a faster pace from what I am told.


This would be a wonderful learning experience! I am one of those who are
not educated or fortunate to know blind people and their ways.
That you all for your input here.
[/QUOTE]

This is something I try to keep in mind whenever I meet a sighted person. A sighted person does not live with me 24 hours a day, so there's no way they can understand how I live or travel independently. In many cases, sighted people tell me I'm the first blind person they've ever met, so when they do ask me questions, I always try my best to be polite. :) Of course, I have bad days too or days where I don't have time to educate the public, but for the most part, I'm pretty laid back and welcome any questions people may have. :)
 

Hear Again

New Member
About people petting the service dogs, what can I say? You know they are animal lovers and not animal abusers. Sure it's wrong but their first instinct is to show affections toward the animal.

I can understand that, but it still doesn't make the behavior acceptable. When a person is asked not to pet someone's service dog, that request should be respected.

Try to understand it from a service dog user's point of view. When a person has to ask someone not to pet their dog several times a day, it gets tiring *real* fast.

Sometimes it would be nice if people would pay attention to the dog's handler/mistress every now and then. :)
 

Hear Again

New Member
Hadn't thought of that Hear Again and I wasn't being mean when I made that quip and I apologize if you were offended. Absent that and other rare circumstances, it's pretty funny, isn't it? I think the manufacturers of these machines have Braille on them as a matter of course, irregardless of where they are placed.

I wasn't offended. :) I just thought I'd point out the fact that there is a legitimate reason for the Braille markings to be on a drive through ATM.

You'll have to forgive me. I can see the humor in this -- I really can, but sometimes I take things *way* too seriously. :)

You're correct about ATM manufacturers having standardized Braille markings on all machines. I may be wrong about this, but I believe it's a requirement under the ADA.
 

GraysonPeddie

Eye/Hear/Speech Impaired
Premium Member
Well, if I can drive (though I can't) and I drive through ATM machine to get cash, I can just read the braille signs and punch in numbers since I know Braille.
 

Rollover

Member
Hear Again; do you attend the deaf events/meets?

One thing that kinda of scares me is how would I communicate with you since you are deaf/blind and I am deaf. Do I sign inside your hand? I visualized this from the Helen Keller movie. Again, unfortunately that I have never encountered a blind person with/without dog before. I wouldn't even know
how to say hello to you.
 

Hear Again

New Member
Hear Again; do you attend the deaf events/meets?

One thing that kinda of scares me is how would I communicate with you since you are deaf/blind and I am deaf. Do I sign inside your hand? I visualized this from the Helen Keller movie. Again, unfortunately that I have never encountered a blind person with/without dog before. I wouldn't even know
how to say hello to you.

Yes, I attend local events for the Deaf in my community.

Your fear of communicating with a deafblind person is completely normal and understandable.

To initiate communication with me, touch my hand. At that point, I will place my hands over yours so you can begin signing.

There are many other ways deafblind people communicate including FM system, tactile/visual sign, TeleBraille (Braille TTY), Teletouch (a device that looks like a typewriter and has a QWERTY keyboard on one side and a single Braille display on the other...when a key is depressed on the QWERTY keynoard, it appears on the Braille display), large print TTY, CART (computer assisted real-time captioning), Screen Braille Communicator (similar to the Teletouch in that it consists of a QWERTY keyboard on one side, a Perkins (Braille) keyboard on the other and either a 1 or 8 cell Braille display as well as a print LCD screen), Braille/raised print alphabet card, fingerbraille (tapping Braille letters and numbers onto one's lap, arm, or back using the first 3 fingers of each hand) and print on palm (tracing block print in the palm of one's hand).

Communication with a deafblind person:

If you don't know how much a deafblind person can see, it is best to move in front of them, touch their arm gently and move back a little further to sign slowly in a fixed range at the level of their vision. If you don't get any response, gently touch their hand.

If you already know a person is totally deafblind, always touch their hand to get their attention.

Many deafblind people have some residual hearing and/or vision. Only 3% of the deafblind population is totally deaf and blind.

Here's a website which explains how to communicate with the deafblind:

Tips On How To Communicate And Comply Effectively with A Deaf-Blind Person.

I hope this information helps! If you have any other questions, please feel free to ask! :)
 

Rollover

Member
Yes, I attend local events for the Deaf in my community.

Your fear of communicating with a deafblind person is completely normal and understandable.

To initiate communication with me, touch my hand. At that point, I will place my hands over yours so you can begin signing.

There are many other ways deafblind people communicate including FM system, tactile/visual sign, TeleBraille (Braille TTY), Teletouch (a device that looks like a typewriter and has a QWERTY keyboard on one side and a single Braille display on the other...when a key is depressed on the QWERTY keynoard, it appears on the Braille display), large print TTY, CART (computer assisted real-time captioning), Screen Braille Communicator (similar to the Teletouch in that it consists of a QWERTY keyboard on one side, a Perkins (Braille) keyboard on the other and either a 1 or 8 cell Braille display as well as a print LCD screen), Braille/raised print alphabet card, fingerbraille (tapping Braille letters and numbers onto one's lap, arm, or back using the first 3 fingers of each hand) and print on palm (tracing block print in the palm of one's hand).

Communication with a deafblind person:

If you don't know how much a deafblind person can see, it is best to move in front of them, touch their arm gently and move back a little further to sign slowly in a fixed range at the level of their vision. If you don't get any response, gently touch their hand.

If you already know a person is totally deafblind, always touch their hand to get their attention.

Many deafblind people have some residual hearing and/or vision. Only 3% of the deafblind population is totally deaf and blind.

Here's a website which explains how to communicate with the deafblind:

Tips On How To Communicate And Comply Effectively with A Deaf-Blind Person.

I hope this information helps! If you have any other questions, please feel free to ask! :)


Thank you! You are most helpful! :cuddle:
 

Dixie

Farting Snowflakes
Premium Member
Hear Again,
your post was very helpful. I knew that one way to communicate with a person that is deaf-blind is doing the Hellen Keller speller thing - but I wasnt really sure how to make the initial contact with them without scaring poo out of them. (I imagine the db-person sitting there and someone rushes up behind them and pats them on the back and the db-person jumps out of their skin. Kind of like being unaware that someone is behind you and when they tap your shoulder or pat you on the back it makes you jump)

With the potentiality of me having Usher's this would be an excellent time for me to read up communication options for when the day comes that I am legally deaf-blind, how to politely respond to the publics inquieries, dealing with rude/ignorant people, and other things that as of today i dont normally have to deal with.

Thank you again for your post, it has been extremely informative!
 

shel90

Audist are not welcome
Premium Member
I'm a deafblind dog guide user (I'm currently working with my second guide dog) and the same thing has happened to me. :( I don't know how many times I've said to people, "You know, there *is* a human being on the other end of this leash."

I've also had people pet my dog without permission. I used to have a sign on my dog's harness which read, "Do not pet me. I am working" but I finally removed it because people constantly ignored the sign. (I've even had sighted friends tell me that people would read the sign, look at me and then pet my dog. Grrr!)

Sometimes I wonder if these people think they can get away with petting my dog because I'm blind. Even after I catch them in the act and request that they stop petting my dog, I've had people say things like, "You're blind. How do you know I'm petting your dog?" at which time I'll reach out, grab their hand or arm and say, "This is how I know."

What they fail to realize is that I can tell my dog is being pet by her reaction both on leash and in harness (it's no different than a sighted person getting to know the behavioral habits of their pet dog), but oftentimes I do not have the time nor the patience to explain this to every person who wishes to pet her.

Talk about some very inconsiderate people!

Maybe have a sign saying "If u pet my dog, I WILL KNOW so BEWARE"...
 

shel90

Audist are not welcome
Premium Member


This would be a wonderful learning experience! I am one of those who are
not educated or fortunate to know blind people and their ways.
That you all for your input here.

This is something I try to keep in mind whenever I meet a sighted person. A sighted person does not live with me 24 hours a day, so there's no way they can understand how I live or travel independently. In many cases, sighted people tell me I'm the first blind person they've ever met, so when they do ask me questions, I always try my best to be polite. :) Of course, I have bad days too or days where I don't have time to educate the public, but for the most part, I'm pretty laid back and welcome any questions people may have. :)[/QUOTE]

It is the same thing I have to remind myself when people ask me offhand questions about being deaf..like "Can deaf people drive?" Just have to remember they probably never met a deaf person in their lives but at the same time I feel like yelling at them "DUH...where have u been? Deaf people can do this or that!"
 

x1heavy

Active Member
Some signs are in place decades. What they had 50 years ago as seeing eye dogs have now evolved into all sorts of service dogs.

Just keep in mind that today a Service dog cannot be legally excluded. There is a whole remuda of things that must apply to a service dog and customer but in the end, they must come inside to help you. Its illegal to exclude them.
 

Rollover

Member
I've known one person who abused this "service dog" and bought a fake ID and a vest for the dog online. All fake stuff, it's so easy to buy, everything has a price. If you have seen the REAL service dog, you can spot the FAKE ones instantly. Years ago before all the petty crap, people were able to bring their dog with them running, stop to do errands (post office, banking deposit, grab a loaf of bread) and then the laws changed. Those were the REAL dog lovers, then after this, the dogs were left in the cars and died of overheating. I think some of those REAL dog lovers depended upon their pets. Think about it. When I see a dog and a human together - I see a companion and I don't question it nor stop it.
 

EllietheEncourager

Active Member
Probably not since a dog would not have been able to help you with the lipreading error.

I believe the laws include ANY service dog (for the deaf, blind, and various medical conditions); the signs just date back to when either people weren't as aware of the various kinds of service dogs, or there weren't as many different kinds. I highly doubt if you went to a PO with a service dog for the deaf you would get any trouble if it had the appropriate clothing or uniform or whatever they call it on a dog.
They do include any service dog. They can not exclude; I'd make sure it had the vest on to let them know it is working and keep going as normal.
 
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