Writing in asl syntax / grammar

saywhatkid

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Thank you reba and laura , you seem to understand the question I am asking.

It would be great to hear from someone that writes in asl grammar to explain why exactly they decided to write the way that they do. Especially when they have already shown that they can understand normal english grammar. After all , this forum is mostly written using english grammar.

Is it because its easier ? is it an attempt to exclude hearing people ? Its it just to be different ?

Some people write that way because it is the only way they know.

Just thought I'd mention that Alldeaf means that all kinds of deaf come here, and some of them never bothered to develop command of written English. What they do know works for them. There are a few that write here that I barely understand, but I don't tell them to redo it. I just thumb past it.
 

impaired

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The equivalent of a written form of ASL is the video recording. Written coded versions are for educational or research purposes only.

No, ASL is not a "sign" language in the sense that you're using. Good grief, it's not semaphore!

I gather from your response there is no equivalent written form of ASL. I can certainly see how confusing and difficult it must be learning and mastering two different languages - one for speech and the other for written form.
 

saywhatkid

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I gather from your response there is no equivalent written form of ASL. I can certainly see how confusing and difficult it must be learning and mastering two different languages - one for speech and the other for written form.

Exactly. That is what I was referring to when I said some deafs do not bother to develop a better command of written English. They focus on learning other stuff.
 

caz12

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i just crap at grammer and spelling,dyslexic.i come from hearing world into deaf world it was abrupt transformation so i can understand why you see it like this,but as years gone by thinking sort of changed,i go deaf club bsl and grammer is different things shortened.if i had signed this to you i would not use same amount of signs to the words i just typed..also people get into habbits of doing things plus it can be hard going using english grammer when you thinking in something else...i not sure if i being clear or not.
 

rockin'robin

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i just crap at grammer and spelling,dyslexic.i come from hearing world into deaf world it was abrupt transformation so i can understand why you see it like this,but as years gone by thinking sort of changed,i go deaf club bsl and grammer is different things shortened.if i had signed this to you i would not use same amount of signs to the words i just typed..also people get into habbits of doing things plus it can be hard going using english grammer when you thinking in something else...i not sure if i being clear or not.

Very clear, to me anyway....many times I've typed something and then go back later to read it and see all the grammar mistakes (not talking about spelling)....and after losing my hearing, I continued to sign, using words such as "the, of, and, as, if", (an example)....even spelling them out if necessary....I believe my job at one time (Typesetter) helped me a lot with my grammar....
 

metalangel

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I gather from your response there is no equivalent written form of ASL. I can certainly see how confusing and difficult it must be learning and mastering two different languages - one for speech and the other for written form.

If one is to write in ASL, wouldn't they "draw" some form of symbols and add contextual information relating to the inclusion of body movement, rather than translating to English?

One of the articles we've been reading on my course said that writing is to record the primary form of any language: speech (or sign).

I don't see why one form of arbitrary symbols to provide a record of a language (English with the Roman alphabet) is any more confusing than another (written ASL in the form of SignWriting or Si5s). If you wanted to convey the signer's mood or intent beyond what was clear from the context of the conversation, you could express that with descriptions just as you would when writing down a spoken English conversation.
 

impaired

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One of the articles we've been reading on my course said that writing is to record the primary form of any language: speech (or sign).

I don't see why one form of arbitrary symbols to provide a record of a language (English with the Roman alphabet) is any more confusing than another (written ASL in the form of SignWriting or Si5s). If you wanted to convey the signer's mood or intent beyond what was clear from the context of the conversation, you could express that with descriptions just as you would when writing down a spoken English conversation.

Agreed. One thing I wanted to convey and failed is when the two languages (speech and writing) are completely different; ie, ASL and English vs English and English, the complexity of learning increases
 

BecLak

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You seem to be forgetting that ASL and English are too completely different languages! When people from other countries come on AllDeaf, and their English is not perfect or broken, I have not seen them being criticized for their incorrect grammar or spelling. Why should this be any different?
 

impaired

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You seem to be forgetting that ASL and English are too completely different languages! When people from other countries come on AllDeaf, and their English is not perfect or broken, I have not seen them being criticized for their incorrect grammar or spelling. Why should this be any different?

BecLak - I agree with that 100%.

A question for you, if you don't mind. What form of writing is taught as the primary method for those born deaf while attending a school for the Deaf? To clarify; if in the part of Canada where the customary language is English will this be the language taught and used as the primary form of writing or is there some other type of writing that is used? Hopefully that makes sense.
 

saywhatkid

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You seem to be forgetting that ASL and English are too completely different languages! When people from other countries come on AllDeaf, and their English is not perfect or broken, I have not seen them being criticized for their incorrect grammar or spelling. Why should this be any different?

Because people feel superior when they step on others to get a higher view of themselves.

I am usually quiet on the grammar stuff, unless someone continually makes the same mistake, I like them, and want to save them from further embarrassment.
 
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