Wheelchairs are SO COOL.

Oceanbreeze

New Member
Wirelessly posted (Blackberry Bold )



My kids refers to their powershairs (highly specialised with full recline to flat, ultralight touch switches, computer activation, "attendant controls" etc as "turbo" or "souped up".

You're, of course correct, super fast PChairs would be dangerous - mostly on uneven surfaces or on turns. That being said, I know a few people who's chairs go faster than you could power walk.
Oh, that's true. I was just referring to a personal preference; as well as the practicality of a super fast chair. However, I agree with you that the speed of most power chairs are, at least, as fast as someone may power walk or even faster. My outside guess would be somewhere in the neighborhood of 5mph? :hmm:
 

Oceanbreeze

New Member
To the OP: I get what you're saying, but as an old poster used to say that's a "fallacious comparison". People in wheelchairs are not a culture. People who are Deaf and use ASL are.
This is true. I don't think I've ever heard of using a wheelchair or being paralyzed as a culture. Correct me if I'm wrong, but, I think that in order for a group to be considered a culture, linguistics must come into play?

I guess this where one asks "Exactly what makes a culture, a culture?" Certainly being in a wheelchair doesn't a culture make....
 

Lily7

New Member
To the OP: I get what you're saying, but as an old poster used to say that's a "fallacious comparison". People in wheelchairs are not a culture. People who are Deaf and use ASL are.
Well duh, that was my whole point. I used an example that was obviously NOT a culture to make it more obvious how ridiculous it is when people get all interested in us and what IS a culture for us in such a matter that shows they only see us as a trend. While it's better than seeing us negatively, it's still annoying when everything we are is turned into a novelty, at least that is what it feels like. Especially when the novelty wears off as soon as they find out that there are actual rules to our culture and how long it takes to learn the language and how hard it is.

I am sure I am not the only one that has noticed the surge in teenagers, mostly girls, who "want to make Deaf friends"... probably thanks to that TV show, Switched at Birth. It's just annoying to me, to seek out Deaf people to be friends with for the "cool factor" - because it never lasts long. We are not a novelty, we are human beings who just happen to be deaf. I would never want anyone to seek my friendship just because I was deaf and had a cool language/culture.

I wanted to point out that if this same attitude were put out there about wheelchairs, for example, it might be seen as the ridiculousness that it really is. Thus the sarcasm. Why is it ok to say "I want to find Deaf people to be friends with" but not "I want to find someone in a wheelchair to be friends with"? I don't know about the rest of you but I would find it odd and uncomfortable if someone sought me out for friendship because I was in a wheelchair, or because I had an oxygen tank, etc. Same as if they did so because I was white, or because I had blonde hair, or because I'm fat, LOL I would question their motives. If all they are interested in is the novelty of whatever it is they are seeking out, then it's not a real strong basis for a friendship and thus not a real friendship.

Novelty only lasts so long. That is why it bothers me when people seek out Deaf people to be friends with because "it's cool".
 

GrendelQ

41°17′00″N 70°04′58″W
Premium Member
Well duh, that was my whole point. ...


I am sure I am not the only one that has noticed the surge in teenagers, mostly girls, who "want to make Deaf friends"... probably thanks to that TV show, Switched at Birth. ...
I think this may be because you are new to the site and may not be aware of a longstanding continuing cycle of interest that occurs whenever deaf celebrities, deaf events, or ASL gets some visibility in the mainstream.

Far from being annoyed, I'm so glad these surges occur -- more interest, more participation, more resources. It's not just teenage hearing girls who are becoming aware, it's teenage deaf and HOH girls, boys, adults, hearing parents, the medical profession, educators, the general public ... and so on. And seems to me that increased awareness of deaf culture, issues, facts is a good thing, especially when the vehicle, such as SAB, is itself informed by Deaf people.
 

Anij

Well-Known Member
Wirelessly posted (Blackberry Bold )

I agree GrendelQ!

For the most part I think it's great that those interested (casually or seriously) are able to find AD and hopefully learn at least a bit about the vast "range" of life experiences of those who are Hoh, deaf, Deaf, LD, as well as those with bilateral or unilteral HL/deafness.

It seems about every 8months there's an influx of new hearing visitors - mainly those who've started ASL classes or thinking about taking a class.

I'll admit, sometimes I get frustrated with those who pop in to ask their homework questions, then disappear (instead of staying to really learn about the hoh & deaf worlds).

Part of the issue really seems to be that there are ASL teachers (especially hearing ones with no contacts with their own ASL community).

For some reason, instead of creating enviroments where their students can meet and interact with local hoh/Deaf ASLers, they actually send them online to ask questions (in writing, not using ASL at all) creating a situations where the students are under the impression it's our "job" to give them answers to all their homework assignments (becuase their teacher implied it).

It's a difficult balance sometimes. While I love that there are so many hearing people interesting in being here - admittedly sometimes it almost feels like those of us who actually ARE hoh/deaf are a minority here - which is weird.
 

kellycat

New Member
Wirelessly posted (Blackberry Bold )

Part of the issue really seems to be that there are ASL teachers (especially hearing ones with no contacts with their own ASL community).

For some reason, instead of creating enviroments where their students can meet and interact with local hoh/Deaf ASLers, they actually send them online to ask questions (in writing, not using ASL at all) creating a situations where the students are under the impression it's our "job" to give them answers to all their homework assignments (becuase their teacher implied it).
I wonder if it's the teachers saying students should go online, or students copping out of doing actual work of finding a person, using their new (and not skillful) ASL and having a conversation. As a language teacher, I know that some of my colleagues WOULD cop out and be lazy and do that. But most language teachers I know do see the value in actual, authentic contact with the people who use the language I'm teaching.
 

CSign

New Member
I wonder if it's the teachers saying students should go online, or students copping out of doing actual work of finding a person, using their new (and not skillful) ASL and having a conversation. As a language teacher, I know that some of my colleagues WOULD cop out and be lazy and do that. But most language teachers I know do see the value in actual, authentic contact with the people who use the language I'm teaching.
I highly doubt ASL teachers are telling their students to go online to improve their ASL skills.
 

CSign

New Member
My teacher is Deaf, and she's encouraged people to
Seek out information through the Internet, library etc., but she's never told students to do it for anything other than informational purposes.
 

Jane B.

Well-Known Member
This is actually not a response to a certain person or post but about where I come from.

I live in as small town in Southern Illinois. Back in the 1980's I first thought to look into sign language. I took a beginning course through the local Jr. College twice (different years) neither time did I make any contacts with a convenient schedule to get together to practice or get to know anyone that already used it. Both times I was the only person in the class with any hearing loss (left side gone, HA in right and lip reading). Most were taking it for their language credit and in one there was a mother & son taking it because of a friend of the boy that used it. The instructor was one of I think it was a couple on staff that were hearing. The college had ordered "The Joy of Signing" without consulting those that were going to be teaching using it. The one class was particularly bad about the amount of changes from what was in the book that was given orally. Thus, my problem was understanding and taking notes at the same time! We did have vocabulary quizes and the one that I did the best on was after a weekend where I had taken my things along to our church camp when we stayed over during preparations for an event and a gal took the book and gave the words to me in random order using the illustrations in the text book for what she was supposed to do with her hands. I think the advantage of that over practice with a mirror alone was not know what was coming in what order.

With that experience I have not been using it and have forgotten 99% of what i did know.

Since then I have seen very, very little use of sign when out and about. And it has been literally years since I have seen anyone using sign locally!

How many of those trying to learn now are in this same situation and thus asking here?
 

MissLady

New Member
I am sure I am not the only one that has noticed the surge in teenagers, mostly girls, who "want to make Deaf friends"... probably thanks to that TV show, Switched at Birth. It's just annoying to me, to seek out Deaf people to be friends with for the "cool factor" - because it never lasts long. We are not a novelty, we are human beings who just happen to be deaf. I would never want anyone to seek my friendship just because I was deaf and had a cool language/culture.


Novelty only lasts so long. That is why it bothers me when people seek out Deaf people to be friends with because "it's cool".

I am with you on this one, Lily. The whole Switched at Birth thing drives me crazy! I am in an ITP and it seems to me that a lot of the Beginner level students are simply OBSESSSSSSED with that show. They really think that is what being deaf is all about. I would say 99% are completely shocked when they actually start learning that ASL is a language and that you actually have to interact with Deaf people to get the language and the culture.

It pains me to think that people seek out Deaf people because they think it's cool or trendy. I myself am hearing. I did not come to the Deaf world because I thought it was cool. At the same time, I have witnessed events where I was just in utter shock that people think it would be so cool to be deaf or HOH. Those people don't seem to understand that Deaf people can't just turn on their voices like hearing people can when the Deaf event is over. Their deafness is a part of their identity. I know some of my Deaf friends get pissy about that because those people never take the time to understand what it feels like to be the odd one out in a conversation when everyone is voicing and not signing (how fucking rude), or get pissed off when they can't understand a conversation and demand that the Deaf slow down or use PSE to make it easier for them.


Those people mentioned above are too proud to even try to become part of the Deaf world. They want the deaf world to come to them, not they to become part of it. I think maybe the hearing ASL teachers are the problem by not requiring that hearing ASL students frequent Deaf events; I think one of the best things that a teacher can do is to encourage students to join the community that uses the language, and get to know the people.

That being said, sometimes it is hard to go when you only know how to FS your name and say what your favorite color is. But at least make the effort! Go and attempt it! Maybe the teachers are being unreasonable to ask students to ask such complex questions (that undoubtedly have complex, long answers) when beginning students have such limited sign vocabulary. It's a conundrum.
 

Kalima01

New Member
I'm grateful that my current lecturer in Auslan is quick to let the class know about any Auslan related events coming up. She's a member of WAAD (Western Australian Association for the Deaf).

I also have a class mate who works in a special needs school so she knows of some social events e.g. Mary Poppins Auslan Interpreted etc are coming up.
 

Smithtr

G.G.H.T
Premium Member
I am with you on this one, Lily. The whole Switched at Birth thing drives me crazy! I am in an ITP and it seems to me that a lot of the Beginner level students are simply OBSESSSSSSED with that show. They really think that is what being deaf is all about. I would say 99% are completely shocked when they actually start learning that ASL is a language and that you actually have to interact with Deaf people to get the language and the culture.

It pains me to think that people seek out Deaf people because they think it's cool or trendy. I myself am hearing. I did not come to the Deaf world because I thought it was cool. At the same time, I have witnessed events where I was just in utter shock that people think it would be so cool to be deaf or HOH. Those people don't seem to understand that Deaf people can't just turn on their voices like hearing people can when the Deaf event is over. Their deafness is a part of their identity. I know some of my Deaf friends get pissy about that because those people never take the time to understand what it feels like to be the odd one out in a conversation when everyone is voicing and not signing (how fucking rude), or get pissed off when they can't understand a conversation and demand that the Deaf slow down or use PSE to make it easier for them.


Those people mentioned above are too proud to even try to become part of the Deaf world. They want the deaf world to come to them, not they to become part of it. I think maybe the hearing ASL teachers are the problem by not requiring that hearing ASL students frequent Deaf events; I think one of the best things that a teacher can do is to encourage students to join the community that uses the language, and get to know the people.

That being said, sometimes it is hard to go when you only know how to FS your name and say what your favorite color is. But at least make the effort! Go and attempt it! Maybe the teachers are being unreasonable to ask students to ask such complex questions (that undoubtedly have complex, long answers) when beginning students have such limited sign vocabulary. It's a conundrum.
what is wrong kindly upset situation problem?! it is risk your access communication understand education!
 

drphil

Active Member
Not sure how being "confined" to a wheelchair can be considered "cool/trendy"?
To each their own-"distorted thinking"!
 

Lau2046

Well-Known Member
I am with you on this one, Lily. The whole Switched at Birth thing drives me crazy! I am in an ITP and it seems to me that a lot of the Beginner level students are simply OBSESSSSSSED with that show. They really think that is what being deaf is all about. I would say 99% are completely shocked when they actually start learning that ASL is a language and that you actually have to interact with Deaf people to get the language and the culture.

It pains me to think that people seek out Deaf people because they think it's cool or trendy. I myself am hearing. I did not come to the Deaf world because I thought it was cool. At the same time, I have witnessed events where I was just in utter shock that people think it would be so cool to be deaf or HOH. Those people don't seem to understand that Deaf people can't just turn on their voices like hearing people can when the Deaf event is over. Their deafness is a part of their identity. I know some of my Deaf friends get pissy about that because those people never take the time to understand what it feels like to be the odd one out in a conversation when everyone is voicing and not signing (how fucking rude), or get pissed off when they can't understand a conversation and demand that the Deaf slow down or use PSE to make it easier for them.


Those people mentioned above are too proud to even try to become part of the Deaf world. They want the deaf world to come to them, not they to become part of it. I think maybe the hearing ASL teachers are the problem by not requiring that hearing ASL students frequent Deaf events; I think one of the best things that a teacher can do is to encourage students to join the community that uses the language, and get to know the people.

That being said, sometimes it is hard to go when you only know how to FS your name and say what your favorite color is. But at least make the effort! Go and attempt it! Maybe the teachers are being unreasonable to ask students to ask such complex questions (that undoubtedly have complex, long answers) when beginning students have such limited sign vocabulary. It's a conundrum.
I don't know why you think this is unique to students learning ASL. Mixing with the target group is also a requirement to learn Italian, Spanish, Chinese, or any language.
 

MissLady

New Member
I don't recall saying that it's unique to ASL.... We learn languages by using them, reinforcing and practicing. That's why the teachers should be asking their students to engage and interact with their respective local Deaf communities.
 
Top