whats wrong with my family?

Reba

Retired Terp
Premium Member
... If I can save up enough money for this Christmas, I might get him a better phone. Might make the difference with texting. Something to think about.
Yes, it might. It's no fun using a regular phone keypad instead of a fully functional QWERTY, especially for old man hands. :giggle:
 

VacationGuy234

Active Member
This is kind of tricky because I went the route of removing my phone and not having a voice line. In my case, I don't get a lot of interaction with any of the people who used to call.

Here is what I would do:

1. Stop answering the phone, but keep the voice line and get an answering machine.
2. When a message comes in respond to it with only relay, email or text message.
3. Make it a point to relay, text and email at least once a week with these people until they catch on. Don't wait for them to call you first because they will slowly begin to not call at all.

If you lose this link with people, trust me, they never interact with you again.

Hope this helps.
 

Audiofuzzy

Well-Known Member
Yes, it might. It's no fun using a regular phone keypad instead of a fully functional QWERTY, especially for old man hands.

60 years is OLD MAN ???

faint.gif



Fuzzy
 

KristinaB

Emotional Mess
Premium Member
It can be for hands learning to use a tiny keyboard, especially if arthritis is starting to bother.

right - my mother (72) is unable to text due to arthritis and other issues. My hubby (53) cannot text due to arthritis. For my hubby, son made some preset texts that hubby might send to me and saved them as templates. So now, whenever I send hubby one that says "Love you Bunches!!" he is able to send a premade template back that says "Back Atcha!!" I don't mind that it's this way, because it's just another way we can connect during the day. I cannot type on my full qwerty keyboard on my cell phone with my fingers. I use an extra stylus for the Nintendo DSi XL.
 

Lily7

Member
I know how you feel, my mom is the same way. I eventually just stopped using the phone altogether and now only use email, IM and text messaging with my mom - once in a RARE while I will use captel but I try to make a big deal about how much trouble captel is, etc so that she doesn't expect me to use it more.
 

Audiofuzzy

Well-Known Member
Well, arthritic fingers doesn't have to use text, can use relay operators.
After all, some parents have to make bigger "sacrifices" for their children.

Some have to accommodate their cars, houses so they are wheelchair accessible,
there are spinal injuries, brain injuries, cognitive disabilities etc

so, having to use only an relay operator is not such a a big deal after all, is it.

Fuzzy
 

Reba

Retired Terp
Premium Member
Well, arthritic fingers doesn't have to use text, can use relay operators.
That's true but the post was specific about texting. That's why I suggested a more user friendly device. :)


After all, some parents have to make bigger "sacrifices" for their children.

Some have to accommodate their cars, houses so they are wheelchair accessible, there are spinal injuries, brain injuries, cognitive disabilities etc

so, having to use only an relay operator is not such a a big deal after all, is it.
Understood. However, if there are ways to make adaptations easier, why not? If the technology is available, why not use it?
 

rivenoak

New Member
Premium Member
right - my mother (72) is unable to text due to arthritis and other issues. My hubby (53) cannot text due to arthritis. For my hubby, son made some preset texts that hubby might send to me and saved them as templates. So now, whenever I send hubby one that says "Love you Bunches!!" he is able to send a premade template back that says "Back Atcha!!" I don't mind that it's this way, because it's just another way we can connect during the day. I cannot type on my full qwerty keyboard on my cell phone with my fingers. I use an extra stylus for the Nintendo DSi XL.

Can they use a speech to text app? I think my Droid Charge offers that, but I haven't tried it yet, so not sure if it's any good.
 

rivenoak

New Member
Premium Member
I am severely vision impaired & all anyone wants to do is TEXT me,which I CANNOT SEE TO GET OR SEND!! LOL Noone I know uses a phone to actually TALK on anymore.

Can you turn off the text function on your phone? That would stop it, I think. But maybe it wouldn't inspire them to try voice calling you.:hmm:

I tried texting a landline once & got a message back that it was a landline & didn't accept texts.
 

Bon

New Member
Haha, I had people do this to me too that now I'm deaf.. Morons, I say!

I refused to answer my phone, turned my voice mail option off and I only responded to texts... people soon started to get the hint, nobody bothers calling me anymore.
 

DeafRaptor

Member
I need to finish writing my email to my family/friends that, due to changes with my hearing (both with loss and sensitivity), I've decided that I cannot and will not be using hearing aids, I will no longer be using voice, I've already gotten rid ofmy voice plan for my cell phone, but I will only use text, email, signing on VP when caller can sign, and signing with VRS when the caller speaks (have unlimited texting and a nice data plan for email, VP, VRS). I will encourage them to learn ASL, otherwise they can use text, email, VRS. I will make it absolutely clear, no beating around the bush in any way, like saying "oh, I've been thinking that maybe I will use something like signing through a relay service sometime down the line due to some challenges with hearing on the phone." That would give them an impression that it is not a big deal, I haven't decided to use that, I haven't thought of any specific alternatives I want, my problem isn't bad, and my problem may not be bad until somewhere far down the line (like several decades). Instead I would use something more like "I've decided that, due to my drop in hearing, drop in speech recognition, and severe sensitivity to sounds as simple as conversations sounds, I cannot comprehend what you try to say on the phone and am not comfortable with hearing. While I really love having conversations with you and love to learn what you have to say, due to those complications, I will not be using the phone for voice calls, but I give you the option of texting me, emailing me (I can access email on my phone), or calling my VRS number. The VRS is video relay service where an professional interpreter will sign to me what you say and say to you what I sign. Please understand that while I love hearing your voice and I imagine you love hearing mine, that is not possible with the VRS, but it will help with quick and smooth communication where me listening and speaking on the phone will not. If you like, you can ASL too and then we can both use video calls and rather than hearing my voice and vice versa, we will get the pleasure of seeing each other." You can use some or all of that (whatever applies), or even change it up a bit, if it will help with communicating with your family. Sometimes you have to be clear, blunt, and firm. I hope it gets better for you soon.
 
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