what do you like about hearing culture?

rockin'robin

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 22, 2007
Messages
24,435
Reaction score
544
Hearing Culture?....that's a new one for me....and whether or not I like it or dislike it...it's not going anywhere....I do get annoyed when hearies say..."you better be glad you can't hear what's going on these days!"/..what people are saying", etc., etc....
 

lucas

New Member
Joined
Jan 10, 2012
Messages
289
Reaction score
0
lol theres no such thing as a hearing culture. What I like about hearing people is the fact they can hear. I'd take that ability any day.
 

hoichi

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 13, 2013
Messages
7,558
Reaction score
336
culture is intrinsically related to and fundamentally connected to language. language allows for the retaining and passing on of memories, and ideas of shared cultural values. hearie languages are aural based. if there is no hearie cultural or hearie cultural traits we need to re examine and re define how we connect culture to language then
what is culture?
one interesting thing here, is Deaf cultural is primarily an "oral" culture in how we interact with each other and pass on our shared values and our shared memories. (both real or imagined)
maybe a more precise term would be "aura"l cultures for what we peg as the hearie world. due to it containing many different cultures, all sharing the same mode of communication.
language and culture are connected or they are not. if they are then both Deaf and hearie due to the very real and distinct ways sign and hearie languages communicate
have separate and distinct cultures. thats not the only reason but its a very apparent reason.
we have Deaf cultures (American being one, of many)
we have hearie cultures (American being one, of many)
my take anyway for its worth.
 

ambrosia

Well-Known Member
Premium Member
Joined
May 27, 2012
Messages
4,982
Reaction score
83
I'd have to disagree. The word "hearing" to indicate a culture is an excessive redundant and unnecessary word to indicate which culture you're referring to. Hearing is basically a body function, one which doesn't distinguish one culture from another. Their means of communication, their language covers that, specifying that's it's aural is unnecessary since that's like the default mode of the vast vast vast majority of humans on this planet. Just because our deafness distinguishes us from the people around us, their hearing does not. It's just THE culture you're living within, Deaf culture is more a subculture within the culture you live. Because the deaf lives are intertwined with the hearing people around them they share do in fact share most if that culture. It's just the language, and values of hearing/deafness that links the Deaf to each other within the larger group.
 

drphil

Active Member
Joined
Jul 11, 2010
Messages
4,802
Reaction score
2
Does the ongoing insistence of there being" hearing culture" notwithstanding "hearing people" seem "unaware" suggest in actual fact there isn't something called "deaf culture"? Computer screens excepted!

aside: as a recent bilateral DEAF person since December 20, 2006 I have tried to find out exactly what "deaf culture" entails- not much success-to date. Supposedly there is "deafself" "deaf being"- how formed and when?
 

SneakerNet

Retired
Premium Member
Joined
Jan 25, 2010
Messages
2,607
Reaction score
75
Hearing people tends to toy with the words that sounds like that words are irony. I find it funny at most of time. :lol:

Yeah I agree especially using voice pitch or level, like talking in a squeaky voice. I once awhile cover up the dirty word using the cough sound.. like

Cou'fuk'gh cou'you'gh , just to tease someone and they laughed... or once awhile that my secretary holler my name so loud around the corner of the hall way and I holler her back "WAAAAAHHHHTT!!!" (imitating the sound of her voice calling me) and I heard people laughed in the office....including the secretary...

With those vocal tease, I'm sure many deaf people don't get it... or why they laughed....
 

hoichi

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 13, 2013
Messages
7,558
Reaction score
336
Does the ongoing insistence of there being" hearing culture" notwithstanding "hearing people" seem "unaware" suggest in actual fact there isn't something called "deaf culture"? Computer screens excepted!

i see, so those people unaware that they actually have an accent when they speak seem to suggest there is no such thing as accents....
interesting


aside: as a recent bilateral DEAF person since December 20, 2006 I have tried to find out exactly what "deaf culture" entails- not much success-to date. Supposedly there is "deafself" "deaf being"- how formed and when?

if you want to really experience a culture, and find out what exactly that culture entails, learn and use the language of it
do you really expect to understand a culture without ever learning their primary mode of communication?
how have you been trying to find out what exactly deaf culture is? surfing here? how much sign do you use and know?
 

drphil

Active Member
Joined
Jul 11, 2010
Messages
4,802
Reaction score
2
:wave:First: I don't consider "voice accents" as culture. Various spoken languages do appear to accent spoken words. On the face of it doesn't seem "rise to the study of culture".

I consider culture part of Sociology. I completed a non credit course back in the late early 90s. Centennial College Toronto.

Since you are unfamiliar that in fact I studied Introd ASL- 3 separate classes here in Toronto back in the 90s. On further discussion-declined to continue the class. I was not part of AllDeaf.com back then eiither. Back then I knew I would eventually become bilateral DEAF-which happened in December 2006.

An interesting article in Atlantic Monthly-Deafness as Culture- Edward Dolnick, September 1993.
aside: whether it is in their computer system-no idea. I have the actual article,.

I read Harlan Lane's theory that my Cochlear Implant is "genocide to deaf culutre". Not sure how as a DEAF person such is
applicable to me-now? Is his suppostion "supported by current desf groups"?

aside Harlan Lane was a hearing person when the above was written. Ironical perhaps!

the book is: A journey into the DEAF-WORLD Harlan Lane, Robert Hoffmeister,Ben Behan 1996
San Diego CA DawnSignPress



At the present time-I have no desire to " regress to"-Voice off OR disconnect my Cochlear Implant" Nor do I consider that I should hire an ASL intrepreter to explain why I choose to get an Implant to a local group of deaf persons here in Toronto.

More discussion in Sociology
 
Last edited:

hoichi

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 13, 2013
Messages
7,558
Reaction score
336
First: I don't consider "voice accents" as culture.Various spoken languages do appear to accent spoken words. On the face of it doesn't "rise to "culture".

that wasnt my point an dyou know it
I consider culture part of Sociology. I completed a non credit course back in the late early 90s. Centennial Collge Toronto.

can a distinct language have no culture along wiht it?

Since you unfamiliar that in fact I studied Introd ASL- 3 separate classes here in Toronto back in the 90s. On further discussion-declined to continue the class. I was not part of AllDeaf.com back then eiither. Back then I knew I would eventually become bilateral DEAF-which happened in December 2006.

if i studied an intro to Chinese 3 separate classes would that give me any deep insight into that culture or its existence as opposed to the views of native or fluent users?\

I read Harlane Lane's theory that my Cochlear Implant is "genocide to deaf culutre". Not sure how as a DEAF person such in applicable to me-now?

More in Sociology.

you are NOT nor have you ever been culturally DEAF. your not DEAF are you?
you are physically deaf, born hearie implanted.
who ha snever earned our language. 3 intro classes doenst cut it pal...
their is a difference



i was born hearie i went deaf at nine and DEAF residential school., sure man DEAF culture doesn't exist uh uh id be more willing to believe you if i haven't seen it and tasted it and lived it with my own damn eyes. explain gally to me without accepting the existence of DEAF culture. have you even been there?
NTID? have you ever even been to a residential school for a visit? how about the DEAF cultural center in toronto.......oh wait according to you our culture doesn't exist
i still argue with hearies who refuse to even accept ASL as a language....

or is
we have out own language but not our own culture

audism runs deep

i WILL NOT and refuse to DENY my culture over the hearie worlds dictates, or your refusal to accept my cultures existence.

take your culture and hearie nonsense and shove it where our signs don't shine!!!!

in chariety
hoich-
 

shel90

Love Makes the World Go Round
Premium Member
Joined
Sep 7, 2006
Messages
45,082
Reaction score
316
There is such a thing as the hearing world but hearing culture? Not sure about the latter. However, the thing is that Deaf people do have a world and culture totally separate from people who live as hearing people or like hearing people.

A hearing world is a world with little or no visual access to language, communication, and information but that is changing a bit.
 

drphil

Active Member
Joined
Jul 11, 2010
Messages
4,802
Reaction score
2
I have never written that I am "cultural deaf". I am still bilateral DEAF-that fact will never change.

The fact some persons use ASL et al and maintain "voice off" Believing that this is a"separate culture" is one's belief. Still a free country.
How one interact with those persons who don't use/know ASL et al might be an interesting study in Sociology.

I consider my culture Canadian.

Enough for now
 

hoichi

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 13, 2013
Messages
7,558
Reaction score
336
I have never written that I am "cultural deaf". I am still bilateral DEAF-that fact will never change.

what do you mean with the capitalization of deaf in the above sentence?

The fact some persons use ASL et al and maintain "voice off" Believing that this is a"separate culture"

is American sign language a language?
 

Frisky Feline

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 2, 2003
Messages
26,320
Reaction score
86
Yeah I agree especially using voice pitch or level, like talking in a squeaky voice. I once awhile cover up the dirty word using the cough sound.. like

Cou'fuk'gh cou'you'gh , just to tease someone and they laughed... or once awhile that my secretary holler my name so loud around the corner of the hall way and I holler her back "WAAAAAHHHHTT!!!" (imitating the sound of her voice calling me) and I heard people laughed in the office....including the secretary...

With those vocal tease, I'm sure many deaf people don't get it... or why they laughed....

Yeah Over years my family always talk like that until i entered gallaudet. It stopped for a while until i have kids, and work in the hearing world. It starts all over again. i just find it so funny even though I am getting it very slow but always got it at most of time. i think. LOL I enjoy the more when my son talks like that to me. LOL
 

VacationGuy234

Active Member
Joined
Aug 21, 2011
Messages
4,030
Reaction score
0
It sucks that I hardly knows anything about hearing culture. If I did, then I would better understand why deaf women want to date hearing guys. Unfortunately, I'm deaf so I'll never grasp hearing culture. I would care less. My life sucks.

Because it is easier for women, someone is always there to interpret. Communication is given a higher premium by women. It makes some parts of the relationship easier like ordering in a restaurant and calling for take out or an emergency.

That's not to say it is a better relationship, just a more sought after one.
 

Bebonang

Active Member
Joined
Nov 30, 2006
Messages
9,443
Reaction score
29
I don't think the hearing don't have any culture of their own except their own diverse culture. As for me, I like hearing person getting it if they understand that I could not hear what they are saying and need accommodations. If they don't get it, then that is a waste of my time with them not getting it from me. Trying to teach them is a struggle when I could not get through to them. :ugh:
 

Grummer

Active Member
Joined
Jun 30, 2006
Messages
14,711
Reaction score
12
hearing culture is like they stand while talking they dont wave hands about , or stamp floor as we d/Deaf do, it is not culturally right for them.....
 

Bottesini

Old Deaf Ranter
Premium Member
Joined
Mar 17, 2008
Messages
43,648
Reaction score
504
hearing culture is like they stand while talking they dont wave hands about , or stamp floor as we d/Deaf do, it is not culturally right for them.....

Don't know any Italians, huh? :P
 
Top