Westboro Baptist Church founder Fred Phelps dies

Lau2046

Well-Known Member
I don't see them lowering themselves to the standards of the Westboro Church...

For military families to behave the way the Westboro Church does is beneath them; people of that church are morally depraved and I doubt it would make them understand how their actions hurt. What I'd like to see is the Justice Department treat them as a radical hate group instead of protecting their "freedom of speech."
 

DeafDucky

Well-Known Member
I'd rather just see him relegated to the dustbin of time and forgotten. Continuing to protest and talk about him just keeps the attention on him even in death- that's not exactly a good thing considering how much detriment he has done. Although I did read somewhere he was in support of the civil rights movement in the 1960s...?
 

TinCanSailor

Well-Known Member
Premium Member
This was posted publicly from the national president of the Patriot Guard:

"Let’s first remember our Nation’s true Heroes. Those brave men and women of our military and first responders who gave their life so that we may enjoy the freedom to express our differences.

While it is hard to find anything good to say about his views or actions, we do give our condolences to his family during what must be a painful time for them. We take no joy in the sickness and death of any man. We do not celebrate the death of Fred Phelps. Patriot Guard Riders hope that Mr. Phelps somehow found the peace that seemed to elude him in life.

It is true that the PGR grew out of a response to protests at funerals. That’s a fair statement.

However, that was 2005 and the PGR quickly learned that there was something powerful in a gathering of Americans who would simply stand and hold flags and let a family know that they were not alone. That powerful thing became our mission.

We are neither a protest nor a counter protest group. We honor fallen Heroes and those who have honorably served this free America. The presence or absence of a protest does not alter that mission.

If it not for this man and his family we might not have heeded the call to regularly honor the sacrifices of our nation’s true heroes and their families. Nor would we have come to know the brother/sisterhood that has become the Patriot Guard Riders."

Respectfully,

Robbie Smart
President

Patriot Guard Riders
Patriot Guard Riders - Welcome to the PGR

As a member, I wholeheartedly agree.
 

Foxrac

Well-Known Member
Premium Member
This was posted publicly from the national president of the Patriot Guard:

"Let’s first remember our Nation’s true Heroes. Those brave men and women of our military and first responders who gave their life so that we may enjoy the freedom to express our differences.

While it is hard to find anything good to say about his views or actions, we do give our condolences to his family during what must be a painful time for them. We take no joy in the sickness and death of any man. We do not celebrate the death of Fred Phelps. Patriot Guard Riders hope that Mr. Phelps somehow found the peace that seemed to elude him in life.

It is true that the PGR grew out of a response to protests at funerals. That’s a fair statement.

However, that was 2005 and the PGR quickly learned that there was something powerful in a gathering of Americans who would simply stand and hold flags and let a family know that they were not alone. That powerful thing became our mission.

We are neither a protest nor a counter protest group. We honor fallen Heroes and those who have honorably served this free America. The presence or absence of a protest does not alter that mission.

If it not for this man and his family we might not have heeded the call to regularly honor the sacrifices of our nation’s true heroes and their families. Nor would we have come to know the brother/sisterhood that has become the Patriot Guard Riders."

Respectfully,

Robbie Smart
President

Patriot Guard Riders
Patriot Guard Riders - Welcome to the PGR

As a member, I wholeheartedly agree.

Same here, I didn't celebrate when I heard about Fred Phelps died, also Kansas Equality told LGBT communities to leave Fred Phelps alone.
Joe. My. God.: Equality Kansas: Leave Fred Phelps Alone

WBC will not go away after Fred Phelps died because other leader, possibly someone from his family side.

I take WBC credibility to strengthening the LGBT communities because majority of Americans support gay marriage now after they realized that WBC and anti-gay organizations are too extreme, or went too far.
 

Lau2046

Well-Known Member
I take WBC credibility to strengthening the LGBT communities because majority of Americans support gay marriage now after they realized that WBC and anti-gay organizations are too extreme, or went too far.

Let's be clear, WBC is anti everything, like most terrorist and hate organizations, it's hate target of the month, which can be anything, depending on their mood. These people are in a class of their own....
 

Foxrac

Well-Known Member
Premium Member
Let's be clear, WBC is anti everything, like most terrorist and hate organizations, it's hate target of the month, which can be anything, depending on their mood. These people are in a class of their own....

I'm saying that WBC made LGBT communities look stronger due to WBC spreading the hate message to everyone, even they picketed the funerals and many people dislike WBC due to extreme measurement - funeral picketing was one of them with "God Hates Fag" message. WBC made anti-gay organizations (FRC, AFA, NOM) looks bad because many Americans believe that anti-gay organizations are alike to WBC.

If WBC hasn't break any law then they aren't classified as terrorist organization by federal government, but they classified as hate group under SPLC.
 

Steinhauer

Well-Known Member
Fred Phelps was a 5 point Calvinist Preacher. The principles taught at WBC are not unique. There are 5 point Calvinist theologians the world over.


Fred Phelps - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Phelps described himself as an Old School Baptist, and stated that he held to all of the Five Points of Calvinism.[31] Phelps particularly highlights John Calvin's doctrine of unconditional election, the belief that God has elected certain people for salvation before birth, and limited atonement, the belief that Christ only died for the elect, and condemns those who believe otherwise.[32] Despite Phelps' claims of being a Primitive Baptist, he was ordained by a Southern Baptist church, and was rejected and generally condemned by Primitive Baptists.[33]

Phelps viewed Arminianism (particularly the views of the Methodist theologian William Munsey) as a "worse blasphemy and heresy than that heard in all filthy Saturday night fag bars in the aggregate in the world".[34] In addition to John Calvin, Phelps admired Martin Luther and Bob Jones, Sr., and approvingly quoted a statement by Jones that "what this country needs is 50 Jonathan Edwardses turned loose in it."[35] Phelps particularly held to equal ultimacy, believing that "God Almighty makes some willing and he leads others into sin", a view he said is Calvinist.[36] However, many theologians would identify him as a Hyper-Calvinist ("hyper" meaning "beyond" or "above" not "extreme").[37]

Phelps opposed common Baptist practices like Sunday school meetings, Bible colleges and seminaries, and multi-denominational crusades,[38] although he attended Bob Jones University and worked with Billy Graham in his Los Angeles Crusade before Graham changed his views on a literal Hell and salvation. Phelps considered Graham the greatest false prophet since Balaam, and also condemned large church leaders such as Robert Schuller and Jerry Falwell, in addition to all current Catholics.[39]

Fred Phelps preached his final Sunday sermon on September 1, 2013. Five weeks later, sermons resumed from various different members, starting with Steve Drain.[40][2]

On March 16, 2014, Mark Phelps, a son of Fred Phelps Sr., emailed The Topeka Capital-Journal at 10:30 a.m. and wrote "Just a quick note to assure you the information you wrote and published this morning is accurate," and "I do not know anything more than you know, at this time, but what you wrote I know to be true, personally, just as Nathan (Nate Phelps) knows to be true also." Steve Drain responded to questions about Fred Phelps excommunication by saying "We don't owe any talk to you about that," and "We don't discuss our internal church dealings with anybody. It's only because of his notoriety that you are asking." As for who is the leader of Westboro Baptist Church, Drain said "The church of Jesus Christ doesn't have a head," and "The Lord Jesus Christ is our head.". Drain also said "For a very long time, we haven't been organized in the way you think," referring to the church having a defined leader.[2] The church's official website said in response that membership status is private and did not confirm or deny the excommunication.[41]

^ In the above wikipedia article, it explains why, when and how Fred Phelps protested the GLBT movement. It started when a member of WBC complained about their child being molested by a homosexual in a nearby park.
 

Foxrac

Well-Known Member
Premium Member
^ In the above wikipedia article, it explains why, when and how Fred Phelps protested the GLBT movement. It started when a member of WBC complained about their child being molested by a homosexual in a nearby park.

I don't think WBC's claim is truth because there was no article about child molested by homosexual in Gage Park.
 

Steinhauer

Well-Known Member
I don't think WBC's claim is truth because there was no article about child molested by homosexual in Gage Park.

Whether true or not, I was just pointing to where it all began. I have often wondered what event had made him so hateful.

having your 5 year old grandson anal raped would do it ...
 

DeafDucky

Well-Known Member
Makes me wonder though if they jumped to conclusion that it was a gay person who did so. Straight men have, as you so...eloquently put it...'anal raped since the beginning of time, ok that may be an exaggeration but it has happened. Seems to me they assumed...
 

Saavik

Active Member
1975046_10203288320879531_1793627440_n.jpg

How many times does this line wrap around the world, just to get to the end? :hmm:
 

PowerON

Active Member
I'm saying that WBC made LGBT communities look stronger due to WBC spreading the hate message to everyone, even they picketed the funerals and many people dislike WBC due to extreme measurement - funeral picketing was one of them with "God Hates Fag" message. WBC made anti-gay organizations (FRC, AFA, NOM) looks bad because many Americans believe that anti-gay organizations are alike to WBC.

If WBC hasn't break any law then they aren't classified as terrorist organization by federal government, but they classified as hate group under SPLC.

Another point that WBC make all Christian look bad and embarrass. Plus, that leave gay become bitter.

And... certainly people who celebrate that WBC founder die, they become alike "WBC" themselves!
 
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