Using Sign Language Voice Off....

BecLak

Well-Known Member
Wirelessly posted

Using sign language voice off with someone who doesn't know sign language -How difficult is it for you to communicate? Share your stories please.
 

Berry

New Member
Any two people who really want to communicate can do so -- Language does not matter.

If either one of the people refuses to engage in communication -- Shared language is of no help.

Often in the hearing world the "dominant person" - boss, doctor, teacher, cop, etc. - will define terms, say what they choose in the way they choose and it is up to the "subordinate" person to accommodate them by making all the efforts to understand what is being communicated to them.

If the subordinate didn't understand it is because they were "stupid", "uncooperative", or "non-compliant". Never that the dominant figure didn't bother to do their share of attempting to make themselves understood.

It may help to recognize that 80% to 90% of all communication consists - Not of exchanging information - But of letting the other person know how you feel about them and your relationship.
 

drphil

Active Member
If one can "understand non verbal communication" being manifested- no problem.

Implanted A B Harmony activated Aug/07
 

Cheetah

Cheetah Consulting-Closed
Premium Member
I have had quite a varied experience. With some hearing folks no communications is possible without voice, however, put that same hearing person in a rock concert and suddenly miming and speech reading becomes natural.

I would say it all comes down to how interested folks are in communicating. All can do it, just some seem more inclined to make the effort than others.
 

DeafCaroline

New Member
Wirelessly posted

Using sign language voice off with someone who doesn't know sign language -How difficult is it for you to communicate? Share your stories please.

I went to a restaurant near my place that has a patio outside. In ASL only, no voice, I asked for a menu, ordered my meal, asked for a glass of water, for the salt and pepper, some cocktail drink, asked for my bill and it went really well! The waiter and the busboy were very sweet and courteous and behaved as if my using ASL was perfectly normal. No discomfort or awkwardness at all. The people sitting at the other tables didn't blink or stare. It was a great experience.
 

Beowulf

Well-Known Member
Premium Member
I rarely have ASL talks without sound being involved. There is a wide range of it done, from guttural sounds to high keening. We draw stares because of it but it feels so natural to me.
 

BecLak

Well-Known Member
Wirelessly posted

When I am about town, I find most people don't find it strange when I use sign because I am a foreigner where I am currently living so it is quite common to see foreigners using gestures to communicate,so most accept signing like that. Another time is when my husband is on the phone which is virtually non-stop all day. We use signs to communicate as well as pen and paper.
 

deafskeptic

Active Member
Premium Member
I have had quite a varied experience. With some hearing folks no communications is possible without voice, however, put that same hearing person in a rock concert and suddenly miming and speech reading becomes natural.

I would say it all comes down to how interested folks are in communicating. All can do it, just some seem more inclined to make the effort than others.

You raise an excellent point.
 

deafskeptic

Active Member
Premium Member
Any two people who really want to communicate can do so -- Language does not matter.

If either one of the people refuses to engage in communication -- Shared language is of no help.

Often in the hearing world the "dominant person" - boss, doctor, teacher, cop, etc. - will define terms, say what they choose in the way they choose and it is up to the "subordinate" person to accommodate them by making all the efforts to understand what is being communicated to them.

If the subordinate didn't understand it is because they were "stupid", "uncooperative", or "non-compliant". Never that the dominant figure didn't bother to do their share of attempting to make themselves understood.

It may help to recognize that 80% to 90% of all communication consists - Not of exchanging information - But of letting the other person know how you feel about them and your relationship.

I have the feeling I didn't quite understand belack's post.
 

sallylou

Potterhead and Janeite
Premium Member
Berry, you are so right. One of my specialists laughed at me last appointment. He probably still doesn't realize that cost him the price of an MRI.

Hearing people who are learing ASL get frustrated when you go voice off but it's the only way to learn.
 

deafskeptic

Active Member
Premium Member
Any two people who really want to communicate can do so -- Language does not matter.

If either one of the people refuses to engage in communication -- Shared language is of no help.

Often in the hearing world the "dominant person" - boss, doctor, teacher, cop, etc. - will define terms, say what they choose in the way they choose and it is up to the "subordinate" person to accommodate them by making all the efforts to understand what is being communicated to them.

If the subordinate didn't understand it is because they were "stupid", "uncooperative", or "non-compliant". Never that the dominant figure didn't bother to do their share of attempting to make themselves understood.
Things tend to go badly wen the subordinate is unable to accommodate the boss due to no fault of their own. I hate encounters like this one cuz things can go downhill fast. It's never the boss fault or so he thinks. :P
It may help to recognize that 80% to 90% of all communication consists - Not of exchanging information - But of letting the other person know how you feel about them and your relationship.

Hmm that's a thought.
 

BecLak

Well-Known Member
I have the feeling I didn't quite understand belack's post.

:wave: deafskeptic! Sorry about that, perhaps I can rephrase it a bit:

How quickly can you get your point across/communicate when you meet up with hearing people or others that don't sign (voice off of course)?

Stories please. :)
 

posts from hell

New Member
I do it well enough that a HOH person that can speak and hear VERY WELL say "That's it, I am going voice off."

Like I say, how can you know if OTHERS know sign language? You can't by visuals. You need to use it and others will.

It's like my Yahoo ID: d3af... Last night I was in a game room getting a game going. One lady was in it and went "OMG! Are you deaf?!!! My brother is deaf!!!!! "
 

drphil

Active Member
Sorry: Bottesini: working on "telepathy" but a few problems in "actualizing coherent meaning". Could be "fuzzy concept"?

You should be feeling much better now: 4 laps for you this morning and hopefully your herd of hounds still sleeping till later tonight. Deserve a rest finally!

Implanted A B Harmony activated Aug/07
 
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