Trying to explain to hearing people

sculleywr

Member
I'm trying to explain why I would need to interpret the Liturgy of the Orthodox Church for a Deaf person to hearing people who, well, think a book is good enough. You see, the Liturgy of the Orthodox Church is printed in a book that includes all the non-variable portions of the services. How do I explain that the service in the video at the end is something that could not be understood solely through a book? I'm trying to include not just what is said, but also what is done by the clergy and people throughout the service.

 

seb

Well-Known Member
I'm trying to explain why I would need to interpret the Liturgy of the Orthodox Church for a Deaf person to hearing people who, well, think a book is good enough. You see, the Liturgy of the Orthodox Church is printed in a book that includes all the non-variable portions of the services. How do I explain that the service in the video at the end is something that could not be understood solely through a book? I'm trying to include not just what is said, but also what is done by the clergy and people throughout the service.

Perhaps you can suggest they wear earplugs to a church service and just read the book and try and follow along.
 

sculleywr

Member
Perhaps you can suggest they wear earplugs to a church service and just read the book and try and follow along.

I was thinking the same thing. ;)

I used that. It definitely helps. I've been interpreting the Liturgy for several months now, and I have an interesting challenge with the technical language in it. The biggest help I have are some Deaf people that have long been members of the Orthodox Church and have helped me break the technical terms into common signs that are concise enough to use when Same-Time Interpreting. I seriously cannot wait until they have a basic translation. I know it will have to be heavily adapted for region and signing abilities, but it will help me a lot especially with words like Theotokos and Panagia.
 
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