Thinking about going "voice off".

Bottesini

Old Deaf Ranter
Premium Member
Your dad is a sick puppy, it's to bad you didn't say something sooner or tell the people at the event "I'm sorry I didn't hear you because my dad won't let me wear my HA's to these events."

So you were never an abused child , I gather.

What happens later can be even worse for a child who embarrasses the abuser in public.

It's not worth dying or broken bones.
 

seb

Well-Known Member
So you were never an abused child , I gather.

What happens later can be even worse for a child who embarrasses the abuser in public.

It's not worth dying or broken bones.

No I wasn't abused as a child. I agree with you about the consequences. However, there are agencies that children can turn to for child abuse and that was even true 28 years ago. I had to turn in a mother to Child Protective Services for child abuse in 1989, when I was teaching school and her children were taken away from her.
 

caz12

New Member
i late deaf 30 now 60,mew is right you should have control of voice,many people on here unable control voice and you doing that to my thinking negates them....would you ask your family put blindfold on if you gone blind...both you and family need educating a voice control clinic or re-habilitation centre,i took my husband with me and we stayed couple of weeks..
dont blame your family for something that happen to you i know it can be dreadful shock and cause much depression it did for me i had nervous breakdown but correct help you get on with your life or you spend life at a pity party bad place to be
 

Mewtilation

New Member
Plus you guys have to remember that you've had years to get numb to the "nevermind I'll tell you later".

I have been deaf since birth and was raised orally and immersed in the hearing world. I am 42 years old and I have never gotten numb to this. That's one of the reasons why I learned ASL and now a member of the Deaf community.

Whenever I go back to the hearing world and get this comment, instead of being passive about it like I used to, I confront it and tell the person saying that never do that ever again. I have lost friends and have pissed people off as a result but I no longer care.

Yeah, I don't think you get numb to that... I still get super peeved off.... :mad2: Still makes me feel like I have the anger and strength to rip a phone book in half! :laugh2: Seriously though, super anger... :mad2: RAGE! :mad2:
 

DeafDucky

Well-Known Member
I still feel the same way at my age (which is older than some of ya lol). Never gets easier so you wind up shutting down sometimes.

Too bad texting wasn't around when I was younger lol.
 

glickchick

Member
My situation is similar - Went from fully hearing to completely deaf overnight, and have made the decision to basically go 100% voice off. From the moment I became deaf, I've hated not knowing how I sound when I speak, especially since my voice has definitely changed. I am only know just learning ASL, but have basically relied on a combination of lip reading, pen/paper, and text messaging. It's hard to explain to people who aren't used to it, but my family and friends have adapted well enough and it just feels more natural for me. Co workers have been a little more difficult to deal with, but they've gotten used to it also.

I think everyone has to do what works for them, and for me, this is the best option.

-Lauren


I'm a late onset hard of hearing individual who's considering going voice off. Why?

1. People in your family will not learn asl unless they have to to communicate with you. If you make it easy for them, they won change how they've interacted with you for years.

2. Forces me to express myself without using my voice. Making me figure out how to sign better than I do with deafies/Hoh people. Makes me figure out how to interact with people who can hear.

3. I can't tell how loud I'm talking. I embarrass my wife and kids sometimes.

Does anyone have an experience or some advice on this? Pro/con?

I appreciate everyone's input.

Sent from my SCH-I545 using AllDeaf App mobile app
 

VacationGuy234

Active Member
My situation is similar - Went from fully hearing to completely deaf overnight, and have made the decision to basically go 100% voice off. From the moment I became deaf, I've hated not knowing how I sound when I speak, especially since my voice has definitely changed. I am only know just learning ASL, but have basically relied on a combination of lip reading, pen/paper, and text messaging. It's hard to explain to people who aren't used to it, but my family and friends have adapted well enough and it just feels more natural for me. Co workers have been a little more difficult to deal with, but they've gotten used to it also.

I think everyone has to do what works for them, and for me, this is the best option.

-Lauren

Perhaps the good looking woman in the avatar can pull that off, but the average person? I don't think so.

I'm glad it works for you though..
 
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