Son gives his 98 years old mom a boot out of HER house.

rockin'robin

Well-Known Member
Perhaps the son is worried about his mother at 98 years of age, living alone?...It didn't say if his mother had a care-taker or if she was in good/bad health....Even the son @ 71 years of age could be in bad health himself.

Then again, the way he took steps to force her to move somewhere else (where other people were around) is heartless. Some old people are very stubborn, even when it's for their better well-being. Perhaps having a full-time care-taker for the elderly lady would best benefit all concerned.

I remember my own grandmother, who refused to move in with her daughter. She loved alone, way back in the back-woods of N.C. ...the winters were horrid there, but she would not leave "her home."...And one day, she went out on the porch to retrieve some wood for the fireplace and fell. Could not get up, and it was days before they found her dead.

It's a very hard decision to make, when someone is very old and frail, in bad health and won't leave their home.
 

Babyblue

New Member
Perhaps the son is worried about his mother at 98 years of age, living alone?...It didn't say if his mother had a care-taker or if she was in good/bad health....Even the son @ 71 years of age could be in bad health himself.

Then again, the way he took steps to force her to move somewhere else (where other people were around) is heartless. Some old people are very stubborn, even when it's for their better well-being. Perhaps having a full-time care-taker for the elderly lady would best benefit all concerned.

I remember my own grandmother, who refused to move in with her daughter. She loved alone, way back in the back-woods of N.C. ...the winters were horrid there, but she would not leave "her home."...And one day, she went out on the porch to retrieve some wood for the fireplace and fell. Could not get up, and it was days before they found her dead.

It's a very hard decision to make, when someone is very old and frail, in bad health and won't leave their home.
It was originally her house. She paid all the bills and she signed the house over to him in exchange of a promise that she would have lifetime estate. He did not keep his end of the bargain and decided he wants her out.
 

TWA

New Member
Premium Member
Perhaps the son is worried about his mother at 98 years of age, living alone?...It didn't say if his mother had a care-taker or if she was in good/bad health....Even the son @ 71 years of age could be in bad health himself.

Then again, the way he took steps to force her to move somewhere else (where other people were around) is heartless. Some old people are very stubborn, even when it's for their better well-being. Perhaps having a full-time care-taker for the elderly lady would best benefit all concerned.

I remember my own grandmother, who refused to move in with her daughter. She loved alone, way back in the back-woods of N.C. ...the winters were horrid there, but she would not leave "her home."...And one day, she went out on the porch to retrieve some wood for the fireplace and fell. Could not get up, and it was days before they found her dead.

It's a very hard decision to make, when someone is very old and frail, in bad health and won't leave their home.
Yep. Lot of missing information in this piece. It's easy to skew the story to make it look like a selfish little brat of a son is trying to steal his mother's home. Unfortunately, that's the kind of newstory people want to read. If this were simply the case of a son wanting to do what's best for his mother, it wouldn't make any news at all.
 

PowerON

Active Member
She should make extra careful and make the legal agreement. Or, leave the will until she died and rollover to son instead early
 

DeafCaroline

New Member
Um, if I had a 98 year old parent who is unable to take care of herself and has more bad days than good and I'm in no financial position to pay for a full time caretaker because I'm also retired and too old to physically take care of her, then yes, I would think it's in her best interests as well as for her safety to be where she will be well looked after and monitored.

It would have been an act of cruelty to knowingly allow my parent to live in substandard conditions especially if it's clear their minds are not clear anymore and they are unable to keep their home in safe hygienic condition.
 

sallylou

Potterhead and Janeite
Premium Member
Wirelessly posted (droid)

In my jurisdiction you can't undertake the care of an elderly person then throw them out. The point is that he accepted the duty to care for the parent and the parent relied on him. Different situation than just refusing to house a parent.
 

DeafTim

New Member
The son is frustrated that his mother is still alive...What a piece of shit he is.. I hope the mother outlives her son...I have seen it happened before. Bad 98th birthday present for her... :mad: Is he tryin to give her a heart attack on her b-day?
 

Mabk

New Member
Obviously she has made it to 98 without a problem, so I don't see her needed something extra now because she hit 98. Unless once she made it to that age, she suddenly got a bunch of health issues(which I don't see that happening.)

Of course I don't know the whole story, but in any case, he is her son. He should be doing everything he can do to make his mother happy.
 

Beach girl

Active Member
It would be nice if her son find a place to take good care for his mother...
It said in the longer article that he has invited her to come live with him.

I don't understand how he could quit-claim the house to himself and cut his brother out of his share of the inheritance. That seems odd; I didn't think you could unilaterally do that if there is another person on the title.

However, I can understand his wanting his very elderly mother to be in an assisted or supervised living situation. At that age, obviously, anything could happen, any time, and there would be no one there to help her if she continues to live alone.

We're going to see situations like this (not necessarily with the acrimonious part) more and more as the baby-boomers age and still have living parents in their late 80's and well into their 90's.

Until fairly recently, I still had my mom, three uncles, and the uncles' wives, all in their late 80's and into their 90's, still living. Now there is only the one blood relative, an uncle, but the two widows and the living uncle's wife are all still going strong, fit and healthy and either into or very close to their 90's.
 
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