simultaneous bilateral cochlear implants

vallee

New Member
Joined
Aug 26, 2007
Messages
1,216
Reaction score
0
Beside Drew and I, has anyone else had simultaneous bilateral CIs?

If you have bilateral CIs, why did you chose to get two implants?

As for myself, I just figured I wore two hearing aids and two CIs just made sense. I find that I do not like to go with just one implant on. I need both for direction of sound and even for a balance of sound. Both give more sound range than hearing aids could ever give.

My one year scores:
HINT sentences right ear - 96%, left ear - 92%(from 1% before surgery)
Words bilateral 69%
phases bilateral 69%

I think I do better than the scores show here.
 

Hear Again

New Member
Joined
Jan 21, 2005
Messages
20,114
Reaction score
5
Beside Drew and I, has anyone else had simultaneous bilateral CIs?

If you have bilateral CIs, why did you chose to get two implants?

As for myself, I just figured I wore two hearing aids and two CIs just made sense. I find that I do not like to go with just one implant on. I need both for direction of sound and even for a balance of sound. Both give more sound range than hearing aids could ever give.

My one year scores:
HINT sentences right ear - 96%, left ear - 92%(from 1% before surgery)
Words bilateral 69%
phases bilateral 69%

I think I do better than the scores show here.

I chose to receive bilateral CIs for several reasons:

* Using a hearing aid in my nonimplanted ear was no longer beneficial.

* CI surgeon's recommendation.

* Increased personal safety as a totally deafblind person.

* Sound localization.

* Better speech comprehension.

* More natural speech and music perception (i.e. two ears are better than one).

* If one CI fails, I still have the other.

* When the batteries in one of my processors die, I can still hear and don't have to worry about complete silence while changing batteries.

Congratulations on your excellent one year scores, Vallee! :)
 

LadySekhmet

New Member
Joined
Sep 16, 2007
Messages
879
Reaction score
0
You know? I do wish I had simultaneous bilateral CI's, but I had the second surgery pretty close after the first...only 5 months, while most people wait a year or two...or longer.

I got it because I have tried wearing HA's in my right, and it jsut sounds terrible, not as crisp as what CIs would give me. Plus, when i don't wear my hearing aids, I feel like I am missing sounds on my right side, so I feel so one-sided. Which puzzles me how people can hear so well with just one CI, while I hear so much better with two. It could be because I'm a bilateral Hearing Aid user, while there's a lot of HA users that only use one.

After I got both activated, I gained so much more than just one CI. It was just a hell lot better than when I wore one for 5 months.
 

Hear Again

New Member
Joined
Jan 21, 2005
Messages
20,114
Reaction score
5
Lady,

I couldn't agree with you more about bilateral CIs.

I actually had the option of receiving sequential bilateral CIs, but I turned my surgeon down for two reasons: 1.) I wanted to wait and see how well I progressed with one CI and 2.) Since I still thought I could benefit from using a hearing aid in my right ear, I saw no reason to get a second CI.

However, as it turned out, after 6 months post activation my hearing dropped again and sound through my hearing aid was weak and distorted. In fact, it got to the point where I could no longer tell whether my hearing aid was on or off.

Needless to say, I'm quite happy having bilaterals. :D
 

etalton

New Member
Joined
Jul 6, 2008
Messages
790
Reaction score
2
I think over here, it comes down to your insurance and your doctor. I have tricare prime with the military (hubby retired) and they will only approve one, it seems. I do wear a hearing aid in one ear, but after activation, if all goes well, I will probably stop wearing it as speech just sucks, which is the only reason I was approved for this first one on the other ear. I would dearly love to go bilateral, but for me, doesn't seem to be in the cards.
 

vallee

New Member
Joined
Aug 26, 2007
Messages
1,216
Reaction score
0
You know? I do wish I had simultaneous bilateral CI's, but I had the second surgery pretty close after the first...only 5 months, while most people wait a year or two...or longer.

I got it because I have tried wearing HA's in my right, and it jsut sounds terrible, not as crisp as what CIs would give me. Plus, when i don't wear my hearing aids, I feel like I am missing sounds on my right side, so I feel so one-sided. Which puzzles me how people can hear so well with just one CI, while I hear so much better with two. It could be because I'm a bilateral Hearing Aid user, while there's a lot of HA users that only use one.

After I got both activated, I gained so much more than just one CI. It was just a hell lot better than when I wore one for 5 months.

I know you could tell the need for bilateral right away. I feel one-side if I wear only one too. I was so surprised they did the surgery that quickly. I many who go back within a year. I gives a more complete hearing.
 

vallee

New Member
Joined
Aug 26, 2007
Messages
1,216
Reaction score
0
I think over here, it comes down to your insurance and your doctor. I have tricare prime with the military (hubby retired) and they will only approve one, it seems. I do wear a hearing aid in one ear, but after activation, if all goes well, I will probably stop wearing it as speech just sucks, which is the only reason I was approved for this first one on the other ear. I would dearly love to go bilateral, but for me, doesn't seem to be in the cards.

You have to fight for bilateral. Insurance is not going to offer it up. It was worth my fight as you will see. I so glad everything is working out for you. Enjoy the new sounds.
 

deafdyke

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 27, 2003
Messages
15,778
Reaction score
290
1.) I wanted to wait and see how well I progressed with one CI and 2.) Since I still thought I could benefit from using a hearing aid in my right ear, I saw no reason to get a second CI.
Hear Again, that was indeed the right thing to do. I really do think that unless the person has absolutly no help from hearing aids or severe tintitas or recruitment, that they should be required to wait a bit, just to see if a bimodal approach will help. It does seem like it's kind of hit or miss .......exactly like the digital vs. analog debate for hoh folks.
 

ClearSky

New Member
Joined
Jun 16, 2006
Messages
1,151
Reaction score
1
I am curious about bilateral implants. Do they help you say...you're listening to someone, and they talk so fast. Do bilateral implants help you handle a fast talker better in terms of also helping you grasp more of their information?
 

Hear Again

New Member
Joined
Jan 21, 2005
Messages
20,114
Reaction score
5
I am curious about bilateral implants. Do they help you say...you're listening to someone, and they talk so fast. Do bilateral implants help you handle a fast talker better in terms of also helping you grasp more of their information?

Well, I can only share my experiences.

Two of the most significant differences I've noticed between one CI and two is the fact that speech and music sound fuller and richer. I'm also able to localize sound -- something I can't do with only one CI.

As for your question about people who speak fast, I think that's difficult even for people with "normal" hearing. In my case, two CIs definitely make it easier for me to hear that kind of thing, but it still doesn't mean I don't struggle to hear just the same.

Two CIs don't make my hearing perfect, but they most certainly make it better than it would be if I only had one CI.
 

ClearSky

New Member
Joined
Jun 16, 2006
Messages
1,151
Reaction score
1
Well, I can only share my experiences.

Two of the most significant differences I've noticed between one CI and two is the fact that speech and music sound fuller and richer. I'm also able to localize sound -- something I can't do with only one CI.

As for your question about people who speak fast, I think that's difficult even for people with "normal" hearing. In my case, two CIs definitely make it easier for me to hear that kind of thing, but it still doesn't mean I don't struggle to hear just the same.

Two CIs don't make my hearing perfect, but they most certainly make it better than it would be if I only had one CI.

Thank you for sharing. So by "speech and music sound fuller and richer" mean you can understand better or it's just quality of speech and music being better?

Do you feel more relaxed hearing people converse with you with two CI?
 

vallee

New Member
Joined
Aug 26, 2007
Messages
1,216
Reaction score
0
In case it helps anyone, here is an old post where we wrote about simultaneous bilateral cochlear implants.

Thank you for posting. As a teacher, I felt I needed the surround sound from bilateral. I also wanted it simultaneous as well. It was worth my wait for insurance approval.

The localization of sound in the classroom is a high focus. Classroom management makes it a must. The other day I had a student whizzing from his asthma, I could hear it and was able to get his inhaler immediatetly. I just feel in a better position with phonenic awareness and phonic as it is an important part of my program. So for me, my choice of bilateral was influenced by my life.
 

vallee

New Member
Joined
Aug 26, 2007
Messages
1,216
Reaction score
0
Thank you for sharing. So by "speech and music sound fuller and richer" mean you can understand better or it's just quality of speech and music being better?

Do you feel more relaxed hearing people converse with you with two CI?

Clear Sky, Music for me is richer. I hear all of the pitches in all the frequencies. Before I was missing high frequencies and therefore I was missing the high frequencies in music. It just didn't sound like a complete piece of music until now. Also the speech in music is easier to understand.

I do feel relaxed in conversations with others. I still don't like crowded, noisey environments. It is still difficult, but less difficult then with hearing aids.
 

vallee

New Member
Joined
Aug 26, 2007
Messages
1,216
Reaction score
0
Well, I can only share my experiences.

Two of the most significant differences I've noticed between one CI and two is the fact that speech and music sound fuller and richer. I'm also able to localize sound -- something I can't do with only one CI.

As for your question about people who speak fast, I think that's difficult even for people with "normal" hearing. In my case, two CIs definitely make it easier for me to hear that kind of thing, but it still doesn't mean I don't struggle to hear just the same.

Two CIs don't make my hearing perfect, but they most certainly make it better than it would be if I only had one CI.

so true so true.
 

Hear Again

New Member
Joined
Jan 21, 2005
Messages
20,114
Reaction score
5
Thank you for sharing. So by "speech and music sound fuller and richer" mean you can understand better or it's just quality of speech and music being better?

Do you feel more relaxed hearing people converse with you with two CI?

You're welcome, ClearSky. :)

By "fuller and richer," I mean that speech and music have a much better sound quality to them. Prior to receiving my CIs, I could only hear drum beats and lead male vocals (depending upon how much they overlapped other instruments/keyboards), but now I'm able to hear every single instrument as well as the low, middle and high frequencies. I also find that speech is easier for me to understand as well -- although I still do struggle when background noise is present.

As for your second question, definitely! When I listen to speech or music with one CI, both sound "tinny" and "flat." When I listen with both CIs, they sound more like 3D (i.e. I can hear more of the nuances or inflections of speech and music instead of both sounding monotonous).
 

Hear Again

New Member
Joined
Jan 21, 2005
Messages
20,114
Reaction score
5
Hear Again, that was indeed the right thing to do. I really do think that unless the person has absolutly no help from hearing aids or severe tintitas or recruitment, that they should be required to wait a bit, just to see if a bimodal approach will help. It does seem like it's kind of hit or miss .......exactly like the digital vs. analog debate for hoh folks.

DD,

I don't know about other CI users, but since I was already used to wearing a hearing aid in my nonimplanted ear, I saw no reason to get a second CI immediately. Each person is different, but I'm glad I made that choice because I knew I had finally reached the end of the road when it came to amplification.
 

ClearSky

New Member
Joined
Jun 16, 2006
Messages
1,151
Reaction score
1
You're welcome, ClearSky. :)

By "fuller and richer," I mean that speech and music have a much better sound quality to them. Prior to receiving my CIs, I could only hear drum beats and lead male vocals (depending upon how much they overlapped other instruments/keyboards), but now I'm able to hear every single instrument as well as the low, middle and high frequencies. I also find that speech is easier for me to understand as well -- although I still do struggle when background noise is present.

As for your second question, definitely! When I listen to speech or music with one CI, both sound "tinny" and "flat." When I listen with both CIs, they sound more like 3D (i.e. I can hear more of the nuances or inflections of speech and music instead of both sounding monotonous).

Thank you for sharing a little bit more about what you meant. I have a better understanding of the benefits of bilateral implants :ty:.
 

Hear Again

New Member
Joined
Jan 21, 2005
Messages
20,114
Reaction score
5
Thank you for sharing a little bit more about what you meant. I have a better understanding of the benefits of bilateral implants :ty:.

You're welcome, ClearSky. :) Are you considering bilateral CIs for yourself?
 
Top