Reading Lips Must Be Hard As Shit

Beowulf

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"Deaf kids" can't "hear" thus difficult to speechread which uses hearing to differentiate various "sounds". This I understand from CHS/Tor lessons on speechreading long time ago.

Implanted AB Harmony activated Aug/07

True, but I know people who are completely, utterly deaf who lipread better than I do, and I merely have profound hearing loss.
 

Stormy

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I'm prelingually deaf with no formal lipreading training, trying to read someone's lips is frustrating the hell out of me. I don't care for it at all, really. I can only understand if they're trying to say pretty simple words, like hello, can I see your ID (or Drivers' license)?, how may I help you?, these kind of stuffs. I won't understand people who can't be very clear on their lips. For me, men with mustaches are always a no-no. I refuse to let myself overwhelmed that I'm unable to comprehend what they were trying to say so I always ask them to write down on a piece of paper as a better way to communicate with me. If I really want to learn how to lipread efficiently (not fluently), I got a long way to go but that is NOT an option.
 

AlleyCat

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Everyone is different and have different talents. Regardless of profound, mild, or no hearing loss, whatever. I don't think it should be assumed that just because you have a profound loss (like I do) that lipreading has to be harder. We've already had posters that have said otherwise.
 

Stormy

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Yeah, but I want to say that based on my experience and then my most humble opinion. Everyone have a choice to learn how to lipread or whatnot. I chose not and it's ultimately my decision because it's not effective for me as it can be for the others.
 

AlleyCat

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Yeah, but I want to say that based on my experience and then my most humble opinion. Everyone have a choice to learn how to lipread or whatnot. I chose not and it's ultimately my decision because it's not effective for me as it can be for the others.

I totally agree.

(My post above was not in response to yours. Just a general response.)

Lipreading works in different ways for everyone, so do what suits you best. :)
 

Stormy

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Exactly.

It takes a lot of commitment to make it work. I have no commitment whatsoever so my chance of succeeding in lipreading is pretty slim, almost to zero. I hope everyone who want to learn how to lipread and have formal training have lots of commitment, plenty of them. I just hope they realize it. :)
 

Beowulf

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I dimly recall those formal lessons in lipreading in elementary school. Dimly because they were always unpleasant. :(
 

Mister Potts

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I have no training, just experience. In my opinion lipreading requires the ability to immediately figure out the context of what is said, and assume/predict some of the things that are said, as fillers. I don't lipread 100% of the time, nor do I desire to. I do have the degree of skill to immediately recognize what is said out of the corner of my eyes sometimes.

If anything, noise prevented me from being able to fully comprehend when I'm lipreading. My brain switched back and forth between trying to listen or lipread. One of the reasons why I discarded my processors.
 

posts from hell

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The only way you can actually say you're an expert lipreader is when you can lipread the cartoons on TV.
 

SneakerNet

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I know this maybe little off topic...
I'm profoundly deaf and I lipread very well. There is one interesting note, after my 2nd divorce, I went to counseling and when she asked me about how well I read lips, I told her that I do read it well. She asked me if I'm able to read people lips without their knowledge. I answered yes. Then she said.."Did you know this called voyeurism?" My head got blown away and I said "WAAAAHTTT??" She said, "Yes it is...." I kept on shaking my head..it's like I don't believe it. I told her that it have to do with sexual attraction, addiction, not lip reading!! She said no, it doesn't have to be about sexual thing. It's about observer who seeking out information from a person without their knowledge.

I was like...okaaaaaaay.....
 

posts from hell

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I know this maybe little off topic...
I'm profoundly deaf and I lipread very well. There is one interesting note, after my 2nd divorce, I went to counseling and when she asked me about how well I read lips, I told her that I do read it well. She asked me if I'm able to read people lips without their knowledge. I answered yes. Then she said.."Did you know this called voyeurism?" My head got blown away and I said "WAAAAHTTT??" She said, "Yes it is...." I kept on shaking my head..it's like I don't believe it. I told her that it have to do with sexual attraction, addiction, not lip reading!! She said no, it doesn't have to be about sexual thing. It's about observer who seeking out information from a person without their knowledge.

I was like...okaaaaaaay.....

She well versed in Deaf Community? :)
 

SneakerNet

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She well versed in Deaf Community? :)

Interesting... No...LOL. It was her first time to work with deaf patient. But she is a well known counseler/therapist and she was very curious about it.

Update: I did asked her if I have to start wearing horse blind <grin>
 

Bebonang

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I am thinking of how we learned or had no experience to learn to lipread before we had a hard time understanding hearing people. I think I learned lipreading from the Speech Therapists with lots of movements. If you had learned to do that while you were learning how to talk with a Speech Therapist, then that is where you learned to lipread. Maybe you might have also learned while in class with the Special Education teacher for lipreading. :dunno:


But for me I learned from a Speech Therapists through elementary only. It had been a long time ago. :(
 

whatdidyousay!

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LOL!!
Lipreading (I am showing my age) is only effective when there is some auditory input, either with or without CI's or HA's. It is a natural process for those who do it.

A scary story. Late one night, there was a banging on my front door. I got up, and answered the door. I was not wearing either HA's or glasses. When I opened the door, I thought someone was celebrating Halloween out of season. The guy there had been attacked with a knife, and his upper lip was in shreds. I could not understand what he was saying, except "A friend did this to me." I guided him to the kitchen, away from the carpet, sat him on a chair, and called 911. Luckily, when it came time for the trial of his "friend," he decided to plea-bargain at the last minute, so I didn't have to explain my lack of knowledge about what he was saying. Argument over a bag of MJ, I found out later.

This happen to me too! I was sleeping and someone came to my door , my dog starting barking, this was before I had Finlay, it was friend of a guy I knew. The guy was beaten up and wanted to hide in my house as the other guy was still after him! I told the guy I was sorry but I have child and I have to think of her safety . I think a gun was involved in the fight and there was no way I was going to put my child in danger for man I did not know! He understood my concerned and left!
 

Mudkipz

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I'm watching this video because I need to work on my "ee, i, e, ae, a, u, o" vowels with oral mouth form (Not sure if I'm watching the right one), but so far this lady is fantastic for lipreading skills.

[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c8m4hv_eVN0"]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c8m4hv_eVN0[/ame]

She is showing the "Shr" orally and saying words like: mushroom, shrimp, shriek, dishrag, and more thoughout the video.

Majority of English speakers would do this and you could lipread before you even hear the first sound of the word (Am I right?)!

There's more video of her doing other sounds orally! :)
 
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drphil

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Bottesini: Thanks for the kind words and Prof SKY at the moment in Cat's dream land.
Seems my use of quotations on the word "deaf" generate a comment. Simple: to me -being Bilaterally deaf - the word "deaf" means silence. As I have discovered here in Alldeaf.com- not everyone views Deaf/deaf the same way-as I do.
At this immediate moment-Implant disconnected-real quiet-silence.

Pleasant dreams Bottesini!

Implanted AB Harmony activated Aug/07
 

Hohtopics

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I agree, I'm another that also thinks that there are sometime overlaps as far as one's lipreading skills are concerned. That some of the profoundly deaf make very good lipreaders, sometime more so than those that have better hearing than they do. It doesn't necessarily always work in a "the more hearing you have, the better lipreader you are" sense.
 

drphil

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Speechreading is a skill which practice enhances over time. It somewhat ties into what one is doing-ongoing in their life being "profound hearing loss/"deaf".

Unfortunately, there isn't a great of information on this topic in the public library.

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