Reading Lips Must Be Hard As Shit

overthepond

New Member
Joined
Jun 3, 2008
Messages
2,078
Reaction score
0
After having been born profoundly deaf, my ablity to lipread came natrually, I never had any training for it. However, back in early 2008, I had the assessments in process of going through for cochlear implant. With the hearing aids, I had the listening/lipreading test, no lipreading test, lipreading only test, I got 40% for lipreading and listening, 28% for lipreading alone. I never knew that I relied on my hearing in order to lipread. Since I have the CI, my lipreading went up to mid 90's whereas I would not be able to lipread at all without it unless it's with someone I know very well.
 

Hohtopics

New Member
Joined
Aug 11, 2008
Messages
1,032
Reaction score
0
Yes, some of the deaf do combine lipreading with some hearing wearing their HA's or CI's.
 

MCB

Active Member
Joined
Jan 19, 2011
Messages
604
Reaction score
38
Amazing how putting my glasses on increased my hearing ability!
LOL!!
Lipreading (I am showing my age) is only effective when there is some auditory input, either with or without CI's or HA's. It is a natural process for those who do it.

A scary story. Late one night, there was a banging on my front door. I got up, and answered the door. I was not wearing either HA's or glasses. When I opened the door, I thought someone was celebrating Halloween out of season. The guy there had been attacked with a knife, and his upper lip was in shreds. I could not understand what he was saying, except "A friend did this to me." I guided him to the kitchen, away from the carpet, sat him on a chair, and called 911. Luckily, when it came time for the trial of his "friend," he decided to plea-bargain at the last minute, so I didn't have to explain my lack of knowledge about what he was saying. Argument over a bag of MJ, I found out later.
 

SneakerNet

Retired
Premium Member
Joined
Jan 25, 2010
Messages
2,606
Reaction score
75
Yes, I'm HOH and I rely on lipreading along with HA. Sometime without HA, I get freaked out when I start lipreading with no vocal sound. You know it's called PSLD, Post Truamatic Lipreading Distorder, after many years I been brainwashed by reading fat lips from my mother, audio, teacher... so on. It's a trigger effect, you know, without hearing aid, I'd scream... arrrrgggg!!!
 

Beowulf

Well-Known Member
Premium Member
Joined
May 26, 2004
Messages
12,467
Reaction score
528
LOL!!
Lipreading (I am showing my age) is only effective when there is some auditory input, either with or without CI's or HA's. It is a natural process for those who do it.

./QUOTE]

I agree. I am assuming you are referring to the "voice" you hear in your head while lipreading. That happens to me. I went more than a year without any hearing aids at all, and I am deaf as a post; yet, there were those "voices."
 

CSign

New Member
Joined
Dec 28, 2010
Messages
3,279
Reaction score
1
I read somewhere long time ago that the hearing people make better lipreaders than the deaf people because they already have the language and know how the words are pronounced. I suspect that those late-deafened people make the best lipreaders.

I found that I can't just lipread and I can't just relay on my hearing aids.... I need both lipreading and hearing aids to understand hearing people.

I would think that if you have a solid command of the English language it absolutely makes it easier to fill in the pieces that you might have missed, or misunderstood.

My thought (I could be wrong) is that those who've had a hearing loss for a longer period of time, and are fluent in English might be better at speech/lip reading because they've been using it longer.

Like I said, my theory may be wrong but as they say... Practice makes perfect (well, almost perfect :)
 

CSign

New Member
Joined
Dec 28, 2010
Messages
3,279
Reaction score
1
LOL!!
Lipreading (I am showing my age) is only effective when there is some auditory input, either with or without CI's or HA's. It is a natural process for those who do it.

A scary story. Late one night, there was a banging on my front door. I got up, and answered the door. I was not wearing either HA's or glasses. When I opened the door, I thought someone was celebrating Halloween out of season. The guy there had been attacked with a knife, and his upper lip was in shreds. I could not understand what he was saying, except "A friend did this to me." I guided him to the kitchen, away from the carpet, sat him on a chair, and called 911. Luckily, when it came time for the trial of his "friend," he decided to plea-bargain at the last minute, so I didn't have to explain my lack of knowledge about what he was saying. Argument over a bag of MJ, I found out later.

Wow. That is scary. I'm glad it was the victim and not the perpetrator at your door!!
MJ= marijuana/Mary Jane? I thought people didn't typically go crazy over that?? The guy was clearly off his rocker (or his meds).
 

planetdoodle

New Member
Joined
Jan 16, 2011
Messages
151
Reaction score
0
Deaf and HH folks are champs in my hearie book. How you guys are able to read lips is beyond me. How in the world can one learn to do that? I mean it must be very hard to learn. How do they teach such an impossible technique?

__
I was born HOH,So it was just like learning to hear.
:wave:
 

MCB

Active Member
Joined
Jan 19, 2011
Messages
604
Reaction score
38
Wow. That is scary. I'm glad it was the victim and not the perpetrator at your door!!
MJ= marijuana/Mary Jane? I thought people didn't typically go crazy over that?? The guy was clearly off his rocker (or his meds).
Yup. Marijuana. You also have to consider the knives and blood and gore and rough people at packing plants. I would imagine that the kill floor sort of makes people immune to violence. Enough to make people go vegetarian. Yes, I was lucky he wasn't following him.
 

coolgirlspyer90

Active Member
Joined
Jun 11, 2008
Messages
1,672
Reaction score
0
well, lip-reading takes years and years of experience. I'll tell you a short story.. I was in BOA grand nationals, and my implants were hurting me because the weather changes alot on me and i get affected by them. Anyways, I had to lip read since i took of my implant (i wasn't bilaterial at the time) and my hearing aid gave me a little bit of help but not as much. As i was lip-reading, my section leader freaked out and said: "I thought you were deaf!?" and i replied. "well yeah, i am, i'm lip-reading." then i heard something through my hearing aid and here how the converstation went::

"You heard that?! Wait, I'm confused, how can you hear through your right ear if you're deaf?"--section leader
"Because my right ear is hard of hearing, which means i can hear a little through my right ear."-Me
"Then why do you have a hearing aid?"--section leader
..."To help me hear.."-me.

oh, good times, i like how i freak people out and i like how their reaction goes whenever i can lipread or hear something that they think would be impossible for me to be able to hear :)
 

Dixie

Farting Snowflakes
Premium Member
Joined
Mar 22, 2006
Messages
13,367
Reaction score
2
I too 'disguised' my hearing or the lack of it up until I was 3 or 4. The only reason my hearing loss was discovered was because mom was saying something to me but had the newspaper up in her face and I couldn't hear so I just walked over to her and pulled the newspaper down and said to repeat it. Mom asked why, I sad it was because I couldn't see her face. It was then they realized I had a hearing loss and everything after that is a whir of audiologists looking into my ears and throat and taking those god awful hearing tests in those strange booths. LOL.

yes it is tiring. but also has its advantages. people believe Im out of earshot but I can still watch them. I learn stuff I otherwise would not know.
 

deafskeptic

Active Member
Premium Member
Joined
Sep 14, 2006
Messages
14,492
Reaction score
2
well, lip-reading takes years and years of experience. I'll tell you a short story.. I was in BOA grand nationals, and my implants were hurting me because the weather changes alot on me and i get affected by them. Anyways, I had to lip read since i took of my implant (i wasn't bilaterial at the time) and my hearing aid gave me a little bit of help but not as much. As i was lip-reading, my section leader freaked out and said: "I thought you were deaf!?" and i replied. "well yeah, i am, i'm lip-reading." then i heard something through my hearing aid and here how the converstation went::

"You heard that?! Wait, I'm confused, how can you hear through your right ear if you're deaf?"--section leader
"Because my right ear is hard of hearing, which means i can hear a little through my right ear."-Me
"Then why do you have a hearing aid?"--section leader
..."To help me hear.."-me.

oh, good times, i like how i freak people out and i like how their reaction goes whenever i can lipread or hear something that they think would be impossible for me to be able to hear :)

http://arthropoda.southernfriedscience.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/11/facepalm.jpg
 
Last edited:

whatdidyousay!

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 19, 2009
Messages
29,363
Reaction score
804
Woah, woah, woah there champ. I never said there was anything wrong with saying "lip reading." My understanding though, was that in recent years the term has shifted to "speech reading" because that better describes the process. I personally don't care what one calls it, I prefer to call it "speech reading." I realize it's essentially one in the same. No matter what you call it, I can imagine how frustrating and tiring it can be.

Ok , I got you now! I had speech teacher and she was telling me she was teaching a woman that lost her hearing later in life how to lipread. The woman could not believe how tiring lipreading is! Some hearing people do not realize lipreading can be tiring!
 

Buffalo

Active Member
Joined
Oct 15, 2006
Messages
4,052
Reaction score
1
I would think that if you have a solid command of the English language it absolutely makes it easier to fill in the pieces that you might have missed, or misunderstood.

My thought (I could be wrong) is that those who've had a hearing loss for a longer period of time, and are fluent in English might be better at speech/lip reading because they've been using it longer.

Like I said, my theory may be wrong but as they say... Practice makes perfect (well, almost perfect :)

Yes, Isn't it a scary thought that those in Deaf Education think the deaf kids should lipread from the get-go, especially in the past before the advent of hearing aids?
 

drphil

Active Member
Joined
Jul 11, 2010
Messages
4,802
Reaction score
1
"Deaf kids" can't "hear" thus difficult to speechread which uses hearing to differentiate various "sounds". This I understand from CHS/Tor lessons on speechreading long time ago.

Implanted AB Harmony activated Aug/07
 

StSapphire

New Member
Joined
Mar 23, 2011
Messages
1,524
Reaction score
2
"Deaf kids" can't "hear" thus difficult to speechread which uses hearing to differentiate various "sounds". This I understand from CHS/Tor lessons on speechreading long time ago.

Implanted AB Harmony activated Aug/07

I realize I'm just feeding a troll, but why are "deaf kids" and "hear" in quotes?

I'd agree that being entirely deaf would probably make it harder to speechread than having any access to ambient noise, but obviously not impossible, since it seems like many members here are able to do so.
 

Bottesini

Old Deaf Ranter
Premium Member
Joined
Mar 17, 2008
Messages
43,648
Reaction score
504
I realize I'm just feeding a troll, but why are "deaf kids" and "hear" in quotes?

I'd agree that being entirely deaf would probably make it harder to speechread than having any access to ambient noise, but obviously not impossible, since it seems like many members here are able to do so.

drphil is not a troll. And he is perfectly right about profound deaf kids having a harder time lipreading. When he put deaf in quotes he was differentiating profound from hoh.

I can pick on your writing style if you like. But I am usually more polite, unless I just hate some hearie who is picking on a deaf writer.:hmm:

I am one of those "deaf" who does not actually "hear" as you might understand it, although I have a powerful hearing aid.
 

StSapphire

New Member
Joined
Mar 23, 2011
Messages
1,524
Reaction score
2
drphil is not a troll. And he is perfectly right about profound deaf kids having a harder time lipreading. When he put deaf in quotes he was differentiating profound from hoh.

I can pick on your writing style if you like. But I am usually more polite, unless I just hate some hearie who is picking on a deaf writer.:hmm:

I am one of those "deaf" who does not actually "hear" as you might understand it, although I have a powerful hearing aid.

Huh, my mistake. I thought I had read other topics by him where he seemed to be trolling. I wasn't intending to pick on him, but I did think he was picking on someone else. Anyhow, I apologize, drphil.

And feel free to pick on me (or my writing style), I can take it. ;)
 

Bottesini

Old Deaf Ranter
Premium Member
Joined
Mar 17, 2008
Messages
43,648
Reaction score
504
Huh, my mistake. I thought I had read other topics by him where he seemed to be trolling. I wasn't intending to pick on him, but I did think he was picking on someone else. Anyhow, I apologize, drphil.

And feel free to pick on me (or my writing style), I can take it. ;)

I will leave you alone if you don't pick on drphil. He just writes a little differently.

I think he is a great guy and I have incorporated many ideas he has given me, and feel his presence here has enriched my life.

Hi, PROF SKY! :wave:
 
Top