Questions about Canada

soulchill

Well-Known Member
I'm on my first trip here and a couple of observations have made me think of some questions. They may apply elsewhere, too.

1. I really like the 1 and 2 dollar coins. But what has this done to strip clubs? It's not really my kind of thing, but oddly it was one of my first thoughts. Are there still paper 1's out there or maybe different rules up here. Or just higher income for dancers.

2. In the US it's common to say that you need someone's John Hancock when you want a signature. Is there a similar expression in Canada? Or any interesting, unique sayings here?

I'm really enjoying my trip to Vancouver. Really looking forward to having some downtime on Friday to do more. The wireless credit card machines are very cool; haven't see those in NC -- nice that it can do the tip and also prints receipts right there.
 

metalangel

Active Member
1. I really like the 1 and 2 dollar coins. But what has this done to strip clubs? It's not really my kind of thing, but oddly it was one of my first thoughts. Are there still paper 1's out there or maybe different rules up here. Or just higher income for dancers.

The smallest denomination paper money is, as you've seen, the five dollar bill. Ones and twos both went a very long time ago! I don't know what you do in a strip club, as I've never gone up to the stage to tuck bills into the stripper's thong! (We did get yelled at by the waitress for being lousy tippers) I'd imagine in a few years they'll have a contactless debit thing inside the left breast implant and you'll just hold your card against their boob for a few seconds.

2. In the US it's common to say that you need someone's John Hancock when you want a signature. Is there a similar expression in Canada? Or any interesting, unique sayings here?

We know what it means, but we'd just ask for a signature. I can't think of an equivalent.

Unique and interesting sayings and things (warning: subjective)
-take off, eh (you're kidding!)
-two-four (case of 24 beers... hence the recent Victoria Day weekend also being called 'May Two-Four', because you should be getting through at least one of those!)
-line-ups (as opposed to a line, to wait for something)
-washroom (not restroom!)
-double-double (at Tim Horton's, a coffee with two milks and two sugars)
-parkade (parking garage)
-hydro (electricity, because of how it's generated)

While you're here, try some Ruffles All Dressed chips, there's petitions to get them sold in the US and you just might be converted to their cause. Don't let the word 'curd' put you off poutine either, it just means a big lump of cheese which'll be all nice and melty like on a pizza or burger.

Have a good time! BC is a beautiful place.
 

soulchill

Well-Known Member
The smallest denomination paper money is, as you've seen, the five dollar bill. Ones and twos both went a very long time ago! I don't know what you do in a strip club, as I've never gone up to the stage to tuck bills into the stripper's thong! (We did get yelled at by the waitress for being lousy tippers) I'd imagine in a few years they'll have a contactless debit thing inside the left breast implant and you'll just hold your card against their boob for a few seconds.



We know what it means, but we'd just ask for a signature. I can't think of an equivalent.

Unique and interesting sayings and things (warning: subjective)
-take off, eh (you're kidding!)
-two-four (case of 24 beers... hence the recent Victoria Day weekend also being called 'May Two-Four', because you should be getting through at least one of those!)
-line-ups (as opposed to a line, to wait for something)
-washroom (not restroom!)
-double-double (at Tim Horton's, a coffee with two milks and two sugars)
-parkade (parking garage)
-hydro (electricity, because of how it's generated)

While you're here, try some Ruffles All Dressed chips, there's petitions to get them sold in the US and you just might be converted to their cause. Don't let the word 'curd' put you off poutine either, it just means a big lump of cheese which'll be all nice and melty like on a pizza or burger.

Have a good time! BC is a beautiful place.

Now I'm thinking about Bob and Doug McKenzie!

It's really hard to stick to diet and exercise schedule here with the long work hours and terrific restaurants. I'm right on Hastings, so lots of places nearby to walk to. Kind of cool to look out the window and see at the same time a sea plane land, ferry pulling out, helicopter taking off, tug boats pushing cargo ships, trains, electric buses. Once the ferry and cargo ship cleared, the cruise ship left port as well.
 

metalangel

Active Member
It's been a while since I've been to BC, but if you have the time for a day trip (or longer) over to Vancouver Island it's well worth it. I'm not sure of the route but I think it's Route 1, Tsawwassen to Swartz Bay, that I remember so vividly as the ferry wound its way around lots of little islands on its way to the big one (Swartz Bay is north of Victoria, Tswawassen is one of the two big ferry ports for Vancouver). I don't know how the heck you'd do it if you don't have a car, though.

You might also go and be amused by Port Roberts, the tiny little piece of land that's a part of the US only because it's just south of the 49th parallel.
 

Journey

New Member
I can't answer your stripper question either but it's a good one so I will find out ha! We use the "John Hancock" expression here as well. I live in Alberta but have been to BC (various places inland, Vancouver, Vancouver Island, Hornby Island) many times. I think a couple of 'must see' places in Vancouver are Stanley Park and Granville Island (awesome market and arts area). As for sayings or differences ... hmmm ... locations in Vancouver are referred to by direction followed by 'Van'. ie: John lives in North Van, the Pillowfight Club is in East Van (yes it's a real club in the Arts district), etc. Vancouver is often referred to as Vancity and Vancouver Island is often just called 'the Island'. One dollar coins are called 'loonies' (there is a loon on them), two dollar coins are called 'toonies' (a play on the words two and loonie). Pennies are now being phased out so you will find amounts rounded up or down at the cash register. For instance, if something is $5.02, you will pay $5 or if it is $5.17 and you give them $6, you will receive .85 back.

Nothing else jumps to mind at the moment but I'll add more if I think of them. Enjoy your time, it's a beautiful city :).
 

Journey

New Member
Just thought of a couple of things. Soft drinks in general are called 'pop' rather than soda and we usually say 'couch' rather than 'sofa'. If you are a fan of baked goods involving chocolate, like brownies, try a Naniamo Bar - they originated in Naniamo on Vancouver Island and are a popular and well-known Canadian treat (especially at Christmas time). Also, if you are not afraid of heights, a walk across the Capilano Suspension Bridge is fun and has great scenery.
 

MangaReader

Active Member
John Hancock? what's that?

From Wiki...

John Hancock (January 23, 1737 [O.S. January 12, 1736] – October 8, 1793) was a merchant, statesman, and prominent Patriot of the American Revolution. He served as president of the Second Continental Congress and was the first and third Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. He is remembered for his large and stylish signature on the United States Declaration of Independence, so much so that the term "John Hancock" became, in the United States, a synonym for signature.
 

tuatara

pro-water
Premium Member
Hey I have a question about Canada. I hope it's ok to tack it on here.

My sports fan friends are all going crazy watching hockey right now. Every other word seems to be "Pens" (and the remaining words are "go".) So last night the Pens played the (Ottawa) Senators.

And it makes me wonder if "Senators" means something different in Canada. Here, Senators are mostly middle aged men in various states of decaying physical condition who sit in a big room in Washington DC and argue about politics. (Lots of disclaimers there. More and more women getting into government, I'm sure plenty of senators are getting regular exercise, and they do actually pass laws, etc. Sometimes they stand.)

But still, the image doesn't seem to inspire the kind of fear and awe that most team names seem to be shooting for. Just curious.
 

Jiro

If You Know What I Mean
Premium Member
From Wiki...

John Hancock (January 23, 1737 [O.S. January 12, 1736] – October 8, 1793) was a merchant, statesman, and prominent Patriot of the American Revolution. He served as president of the Second Continental Congress and was the first and third Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. He is remembered for his large and stylish signature on the United States Declaration of Independence, so much so that the term "John Hancock" became, in the United States, a synonym for signature.

something new I learned today. yep I sign like him
 

Royale

Active Member
Hey I have a question about Canada. I hope it's ok to tack it on here.

My sports fan friends are all going crazy watching hockey right now. Every other word seems to be "Pens" (and the remaining words are "go".) So last night the Pens played the (Ottawa) Senators.

And it makes me wonder if "Senators" means something different in Canada. Here, Senators are mostly middle aged men in various states of decaying physical condition who sit in a big room in Washington DC and argue about politics. (Lots of disclaimers there. More and more women getting into government, I'm sure plenty of senators are getting regular exercise, and they do actually pass laws, etc. Sometimes they stand.)

But still, the image doesn't seem to inspire the kind of fear and awe that most team names seem to be shooting for. Just curious.

"Pens" is a shortcut for the Pittsburgh Penguins. As a diehard hockey fans, we have had shortcuts/nicknames for NHL teams. The Senators are "Sens" and Montreal Canadiens have a shortcut known as "Habs".

The Senators are named after senators that we have as one of our two legislative bodies which are based in Ottawa, our national capital city. Many hockey fans in Ottawa proudly approve of their team logo and shortcut. :)
 

lovezebras

Active Member
At the bank we ask people for their "john henry" I've heard people say john hancock though as well. Asked a few guy friend and at strip club ppl give 5s or more to dancers.
 
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