Question about the name deaf and blind school

Janetspeer

New Member
I am a retired teacher. I was at a high school track meet and they were announcing the scores. Over and over I heard the score for the deaf and blind school. It was jarring for me and I couldn’t figure out why. I taught at a school for the physically impaired but that was not the name of the school. I also worked at a school for students who were emotionally handicapped or had severe behaviour problems but that was not the name of their school. I grew up in Little Rock AR and lived close to the Deaf and Blind School - I grew up hearing the name of the school but now for some reason it doesn’t fit how we talk about people. Help me understand if I am off base.
 

Janetspeer

New Member
I think it was jarring because non of the other schools describe the population in terms of their disabilities. The other school are named for what they are learning - ex school of the arts, Miami school for architecture and design, high school for science, culinary arts etc etc my School was not called Physically impaired elementary.
 

Lysander

Well-Known Member
I don't know about all but the two Deaf schools in my state have deaf in the name. Western PA School for the Deaf and PA School for the Deaf. Otherwise called WPSD and PSD. So that may just be the name of the school.
 

Lysander

Well-Known Member
That is my point - the Deaf and Blind School is the name of the school. But should it be?
Oh gotcha. I don't know. I think a lot of the names of these schools are from decades ago. But quite honestly I don't see a problem. I mean no offense to you, but the concern about it being in the names makes it seem like there's something inherently bad about being Deaf/Blind. Like you can't mention it because it's not ok. So many people are proud of their Deaf identity that I think they're ok with it being in the name. So many people I know that went to Deaf school are really proud of their Deaf school experiences. I think they want people to know.

But I'm hearing, so I don't really deserve an opinion on the issue. There are others who's opinion would be more appropriate.
 

Janetspeer

New Member
I think it’s great that deaf people are proud to be deaf and our proud of their schools. I do think the name “ Deaf and Blind School” is historical. As a teacher we worked hard at not identifying kids by their disabilities. I don’t even know if deaf/blind are considered disabilities. I only reacted as a person who is not part of the deaf/blind community and you are right that members of that community should have this conversation -if and only if they think it has any validity.
 

peekaboo

Well-Known Member
SO you are asking why label the name DEAF and BLIND when It could be call something else?

Is that what you are asking?
 

Janetspeer

New Member
After listening to the name Deaf and Blind High School being announced over and over during a two day track meet, I just wondered if the stakeholders in the school liked the name or is it just traditional. As a teacher, I started thinking we don’t have schools that name any other disability. I don’t know if being blind or deaf is even considered a disability. I am totally clueless about how the students feel about having their school named deaf and blind high school. As I said before most schools are name by what they are studying, art magnet, music, design and architecture etc. this is only a question - not an opinion.
 

Tetracyclone

Active Member
Janet-
In general it is true other schools that serve disabled kids have neutral names, the schools you mentioned in contrast: "school of the arts, Miami school for architecture and design, high school for science, culinary arts", do identify the purpose for which students attend. A deaf and blind school offers kids the tools to manage this life as deaf and blind people. It is another specialized curriculum I suspect many parents appreciate the clear, purpose-oriented names when they are searching for schools to serve their children, especially in the internet age.
 

Janetspeer

New Member
After listening to the name Deaf and Blind High School being announced over and over during a two day track meet, I just wondered if the stakeholders in the school liked the name or is it just traditional. As a teacher, I started thinking we don’t have schools that name any other disability. I don’t know if being blind or deaf is even considered a disability. I am totally clueless about how the students feel about having their school named deaf and blind high school. As I said before most schools are name by what they are studying, art magnet, music, design and architecture etc. this is only a question - not an opinion.
 

Teacherofthedeaf

Active Member
I think it’s great that deaf people are proud to be deaf and our proud of their schools. I do think the name “ Deaf and Blind School” is historical. As a teacher we worked hard at not identifying kids by their disabilities. I don’t even know if deaf/blind are considered disabilities. I only reacted as a person who is not part of the deaf/blind community and you are right that members of that community should have this conversation -if and only if they think it has any validity.
Was it the state school for the deaf and blind? Like "Maryland School for the Deaf"? or Just "The Deaf and Blind School"?
 

MCB

Active Member
I did some research. The Arkansas state schools for the deaf and the blind are at opposite ends of a large campus, and are administratively linked. Don't many people fingerspell the name-- like "KSD" for Kansas School for the Deaf? The disability-linked context is not as important-- what is more important is the culture.
 

Janetspeer

New Member
I did some research. The Arkansas state schools for the deaf and the blind are at opposite ends of a large campus, and are administratively linked. Don't many people fingerspell the name-- like "KSD" for Kansas School for the Deaf? The disability-linked context is not as important-- what is more important is the culture.
 

Janetspeer

New Member
I was 5 years old and all I remember when it snowed in Little Rock, the Deaf and Blind School had a huge hill and we would go there to slide down the hill on cardboard.

At the track meet, I don’t know if the Deaf and Blind School had more like a city in their name,
 

deafdyke

Well-Known Member
I think it’s great that deaf people are proud to be deaf and our proud of their schools. I do think the name “ Deaf and Blind School” is historical. As a teacher we worked hard at not identifying kids by their disabilities. I don’t even know if deaf/blind are considered disabilities. I only reacted as a person who is not part of the deaf/blind community and you are right that members of that community should have this conversation -if and only if they think it has any validity.
Oh GAWD the "person first" language thing is DUMB! ALL a disabilty is, is a DESCRIPTOR. There's no handwringing over other descriptors like gay, redheaded, lefthanded etc. Just call me DEAF. That's what I am! Mental gymnastics with language makesit sound like there's something wrong with being dhh, blind/low vision, etc
 

Muse

Active Member
Oh GAWD the "person first" language thing is DUMB! ALL a disabilty is, is a DESCRIPTOR. There's no handwringing over other descriptors like gay, redheaded, lefthanded etc. Just call me DEAF. That's what I am! Mental gymnastics with language makesit sound like there's something wrong with being dhh, blind/low vision, etc

Hey, just wanted to say you rock. Side thought here:

Why not look towards reframing disability into the skills people with "disabilities" have as a result of their disabilities? These are skills people without disabilities don't have and these skills can translate into major advantages.
 

cdmeggers

Well-Known Member
better than being called an "Asylum for the Deaf and Dumb" like the very early schools were called in the 1800s. Yes, there are schools for the Deaf and Blind, that's just how it is. The schools were built in mind for Deaf and/or Blind, and named as such.
 
Top