Police Officer and deaf in an ear?

jbadoef0607

New Member
Hello everyone,

This is my first post and I wanted to address something that has been eating at me for quite some time. A little bit of a background on me. I have been in the Oregon Army National Guard for nearly 8 years now, have two overseas combat tours under my belt as an infantryman (Afghanistan in 2006 and Iraq in 2009). However, it took a huge fight for me to even get into the military. I am deaf in my left ear, something I've had since childhood, and because of that it took me nearly 2 full years to join. Had to have a waiver, but eventually I was able to join. Two things I've wanted to do since I was little was to become "an army man and a police man", my uncle was a cop for a long time and played a huge part in my desires.

So onto the question at hand, would I be able to accomplish my dream of becoming a law enforcement officer in Oregon? despite being deaf in my left ear? and would an agency put my military training and experience into consideration despite that deficiency?

any and all comments and suggestions are welcome.
 

Tousi

Well-Known Member
I think you have something going there for yourself re: becoming a policeman because of your military background and dedication. Have you inquired about this with the Roseburg PD? We are from CA spend a month every summer there in Roseburg. Maybe we can meet for coffee this summer.....welcome to Alldeaf.
 

deafbajagal

New Member
Go for it! And if they say no, fight for it! There's no reason, with reasonable accommodations being provided, that you cannot do this job. Good luck, and let us know how it went.
 

DDU

New Member
as has been mentioned there have been hearing impaired police in different places. there was a thread about a deaf cop who was shot on duty in Alaska. if i recall correctly he was a Sargent too.
also thanks for serving us- in the war
 

rolling7

New Member
This is a different time. Back in the early 60s, I applied for a wavier and was totally turn down. So i do know the fellings you had going through that. I now have a son who is an Army Ranger and a medic.
Here in Houston, Texas we have a monthly meeting between the police department and the deaf community and we share ideas as well as help one another. it is called P.I.P.
positive interact program. Not sure if you have a group up there but do check it out.
Our leader is Sgt. James Sobota with the HPD, Houston Police Department and more than once in the 28 years I have been attending P.I.P., the subject of deaf police officers has come up. While Houston has not deaf on the force, we do have many deaf on desk or support duty. Often, the deaf will share that they have meet a deaf person who is a full officer. So i do know in this age and time it is possible.......oh, to be young again!!! You may contact Sgt. Sobota at James.Sobota@cityofhouston.net and he will be happy to fill you in about becoming an office. Good Luck and welcome to AD
 

Sinjid

New Member
Hello,

I apologize for replying to this very old thread that is nearly seven years old. That said, under normal circumstances I wouldn't reply; but, after coming across this thread on the internet, I have regained some hope amidst this depression I've been going through.

So, like the original poster, I have a deaf ear -- my left ear has also been deaf, except my deafness goes back to when I was born (nerve didn't fully develop). I wanted to get into Air Force ROTC at my institution, and talked to the folks there, and they said they did have someone with a deaf ear from some time back graduate and become an officer; however, a few months ago, the detachment's commanding officer told me that it would be very unlikely. In order to find out what my chances of obtaining a waiver would be like, I did a ton of investigation. Eventually, I managed to get in touch with the folks that handle waivers (don't know what they're called), and to my dismay, the folks there told me that there is no waiver for someone of my condition in the US Air Force (however, the Army would take me with a cochlear ear implant -- no way am I getting one of those).

Now, that said, I really want to have the experience of serving. My father's side has a very long history of service in the US military, and as of now, I would be the first of the generation since (we don't know how long, we know for certain at least one man from every generation has served since the American Civil War, we are uncertain about before that since those relatives are too long gone) who-knows-how-long to not serve (I am the only grandson of my father's name). To my family and I, tradition is very important, and I've wanted to serve for at least four years ever since I can remember (OK, maybe not that far back, but close enough). At this point, I will even serve in the National Guard if they'd have me (however, I am a cyber security major).

If anyone has any information on how I can serve in uniform, that would be great. It would just make my day after going through months of depression ever since that phone call, regarding my waiver, earlier this year.

Many thanks,
'Sinjid'
 

Reba

Retired Terp
Premium Member
I don't have any specific information. Have you gone thru the recruitment chain of command in each service?

Other than that, you can try an appeal thru your Congressman. A congressional inquiry to the military chain requires a quick response.

I know that the FBI is recruiting for cyber security majors.
 

Sinjid

New Member
I don't have any specific information. Have you gone thru the recruitment chain of command in each service?

Other than that, you can try an appeal thru your Congressman. A congressional inquiry to the military chain requires a quick response.

I know that the FBI is recruiting for cyber security majors.

Hello,

I've only spoken with my local ROTC detachments (AFROTC and ROTC) and over the years, several recruiters. I did not know that I could appeal through a Congressman. I know I could easily get in touch with my local Congressman, Matt Gaetz (he's from my area and very responsive). How does that work and how would I get started with that?

And thank you for your response!

Regards,
Sinjid
 

DeafNerdMommy

Well-Known Member
I live in oregon, and the army recruits here gave me a waiver to sign (at the time mod to severe hoh and auditory processing disorder in both ears). I didn't want to join so I declined the offer, but they tries recruiting everyone I knew from high school.
 

TinCanSailor

Well-Known Member
Premium Member
Reba is essentially correct. I used to handle congressional inquiries at my command. Basically you need to draft a letter to your district Congressman and both of your state's U.S. Senators. One letter to all three is acceptable. Make sure you show their names at the bottom of your letter.

Now, state in your letter:

-What are you trying to do.
-Who you have talked to and what they said.
-Explain your desire to serve your country.
-Thank them in advance for any assistance they may be able to provide.
-Don't make it more than two pages long.
-Attach any documentation such as (rejection) (medical documents) etc.

Mail the letters separately, certified, signature required. Allow some time for them to draft correspondence to your district recruiting area. By law they must send and receive back a reply from the recruiting district before a Senate letter reply comes back to you. There is a time limit for the recruiting district to reply, but not Washington, so be patient.

If Washington says no......they were your last chance. Stay positive, miracles can happen.

(I believe there are sample letters on the internet.)
 

Lau2046

Well-Known Member
Hello everyone,

This is my first post and I wanted to address something that has been eating at me for quite some time. A little bit of a background on me. I have been in the Oregon Army National Guard for nearly 8 years now, have two overseas combat tours under my belt as an infantryman (Afghanistan in 2006 and Iraq in 2009). However, it took a huge fight for me to even get into the military. I am deaf in my left ear, something I've had since childhood, and because of that it took me nearly 2 full years to join. Had to have a waiver, but eventually I was able to join. Two things I've wanted to do since I was little was to become "an army man and a police man", my uncle was a cop for a long time and played a huge part in my desires.

So onto the question at hand, would I be able to accomplish my dream of becoming a law enforcement officer in Oregon? despite being deaf in my left ear? and would an agency put my military training and experience into consideration despite that deficiency?

any and all comments and suggestions are welcome.

Sorry I know the thread is old, but....If I had known I could fight and win, I would have tried harder to join. I enlisted in the Marines when I turned 18 but was rejected for my hearing loss. I also wanted to be a cop but believed if the military didn't want me, why would they? Keep fighting and pursue every avenue. It's the squeaky wheel that gets the oil.....DON'T EVER GIVE UP!

Laura
 

Sinjid

New Member
Reba is essentially correct. I used to handle congressional inquiries at my command. Basically you need to draft a letter to your district Congressman and both of your state's U.S. Senators. One letter to all three is acceptable. Make sure you show their names at the bottom of your letter.

Now, state in your letter:

-What are you trying to do.
-Who you have talked to and what they said.
-Explain your desire to serve your country.
-Thank them in advance for any assistance they may be able to provide.
-Don't make it more than two pages long.
-Attach any documentation such as (rejection) (medical documents) etc.

Mail the letters separately, certified, signature required. Allow some time for them to draft correspondence to your district recruiting area. By law they must send and receive back a reply from the recruiting district before a Senate letter reply comes back to you. There is a time limit for the recruiting district to reply, but not Washington, so be patient.

If Washington says no......they were your last chance. Stay positive, miracles can happen.

(I believe there are sample letters on the internet.)

TinCanSailor,

Thank you very much! I didn't go through with trying to obtain a waiver and going through the medical process because of what the lady, that handles waivers, told me; but, with this information, I will certainly have a go at it. This information is very helpful, and I appreciate this greatly!

Regards,
Sinjid
 
Top