Phone Interviews Discriminatory?

DeafCaroline

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Actually, I have to confess I that my one and only phone interview worked out into a great job despite the fact that I told my head hunter I wouldn't do one.

My head hunter called me about an opportunity that was a phone interview. After cussing out my head hunter for a good few minutes, he explains to me that the guy is in Houston so a face to face meeting was not going to happen. I was lucky I made it through the interview without a relay service. One hour later, the company's Human Resources person calls me to confirm plane tickets for the next day to Houston Texas, the company's home office. After a long flight, amazingly, nobody at the home office other than my boss, could interview me. I thought for sure I would not get the job. After I got home, there was a message from the local office to come in and talk to someone. I was given an offer that day.

I agree. It is a huge disadvantage, but you never know how it will work out.

You mean you relied on your hearing for this interview?
 

Speedy Hawk

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I dunno how common it is in UK. I only had call once for phone interview and when Mum answered and explain it impossible for me do phone interview and they hang up.
 

shel90

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I dunno how common it is in UK. I only had call once for phone interview and when Mum answered and explain it impossible for me do phone interview and they hang up.

They hung up? GEeez!
 

VacationGuy234

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You mean you relied on your hearing for this interview?

Yes, I can't do it with all voices, but the guy I talked to was in my hearing range. Granted, it was also ten years ago, but at that point, I was already stopping phone usage.

Today, it's doubtful I could get through it, there would be too many times I would have to ask for a repeat of the question. However, a lot more people use instant messenger today so a messenger interview is quite possible.

The OP could use IM as a phone alternative. I don't trust the relay service myself.
 

shel90

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Phone interviews are absolutely discriminatory and should not be used with ANY candidate, not just deaf/hoh folks.

There should be enough information on a person's resume to determine if they get a full in-person interview. There does not need to be any pre-selection process involving a phone call. HR people need to do their jobs better.

Banjo is right. HR personnel have gotten lazy.

That I totally agree with. When I was applying for jobs in my 20s (in the 1990s), I never was asked to do a phone interview. I landed all of the jobs I have interviewed for. Then, I went to grad school and didnt apply for any jobs in the hearing world for 3 years. After graduation, I applied everywhere for a teaching job and I was puzzled about getting invited to do a phone interview (in 2002). So, I used the relay, not understanding what was required and thinking I was going to speak with a live person. Turned out to be an automated machine but because the relay service was too slow, the machine hung up and I was immediately disqualified. WTF?!

First time, I didnt get a job that I interviewed for. :mad:
 

Speedy Hawk

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They hung up? GEeez!

Yep, mum even phone them back ask if it possible contact by through email instead. They make excuses saying don't have email address, etc. I just told mum at end put phone down, it not worth it, I don't want work for them.
 

shel90

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Yep, mum even phone them back ask if it possible contact by through email instead. They make excuses saying don't have email address, etc. I just told mum at end put phone down, it not worth it, I don't want work for them.

Damn these hearing idiots!
 

dereksbicycles

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This is a very good point. Depending on the area and the position, companies can get upwards of 1000 applications per vacancy. Added to that, since the internet tools for finding jobs are pretty standard and accessible for everyone, it is often the same people applying for every job in that field, over and over again. It is insane. The ease of applying attracts a lot of "just looking" applicants: people who already have a job but are applying for whatever reason: to get leverage with their current employer, move up the rungs quicker, just plain boredom, etc.

I think the Dept. of Labor needs to allow companies to use special hiring procedures in certain instances where they only have to accept applications from people who are unemployed or not already at a full-time position. It would decrease applicant stuffage considerably.

The sad thing is that many companies don't care whether you were working or not. They just want to fill in spot regardless of whether the person is currently employed or not. Just realize that if they hire someone who quit their former job to work for the company, this person will jump ship again when something better comes.
 

VacationGuy234

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There should be enough information on a person's resume to determine if they get a full in-person interview. There does not need to be any pre-selection process involving a phone call. HR people need to do their jobs better.

Banjo is right. HR personnel have gotten lazy.

You can't do this for a technical job position because there is no way, even with a two page resume, it could give you any idea of whether that person is qualified for the job.

I used to think it was unfair to ask technical questions during an interview, but I soon found out you are not doing someone any favors by giving them a job they are not qualified to do. Yes, people can learn, but you have to have some foundation for technical positions.
 

RachelRene

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Because I work virtually, I get stuck doing a lot of phone interviews with clients, as well as trying to do meetings virtually. We use Skype a lot, which at least then I can see people's mouths, but it can be difficult still. We're trying to work out something for group meetings, but I don't know what... I also wish there was some way that I can have captions along with the Skype video (anyone know how to do this?)...

I had one group interview using Google+ hangout, which was interesting but difficult to follow.

I recently just completely screwed up a phone interview because the captions weren't keeping up (I usually use clear captions), and I suddenly forgot how to say a couple words... I think I'll try asking for IM interviews, or email in the future... but they usually want to *talk* to a person, get a sense of who they are, and that can be hard in print.
 
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