Obamacare and mandatory implants?

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Steinhauer

Well-Known Member
I've already explained enough for people with intelligence to comprehend. Perhaps your critical thinking is not up to par? derp.

you explained how micro chipping humans was paranoid and a fallacy in logic.derp.

Its already being done. derp.

a paper file or a computer database, which is more efficient?

derp.
 

kokonut

New Member
I've already explained enough for people with intelligence to comprehend. Perhaps your critical thinking is not up to par? derp.

I don't have the ability to read minds. The response in #44 leaves it open ended and doesn't address fully my question. It's already obvious when it comes to technology and the future, no one can really tell which way it could go. But I don't see that coming from you. What's not helpful if one has a certain savoir faire when it comes to certain questions where it becomes a signature response.
 

Jiro

If You Know What I Mean
Premium Member
you explained how micro chipping humans was paranoid and a fallacy in logic.derp.

Its already being done. derp.

ah..... it's ironic that you claimed that I attempted to confuse further... :lol:

Truth: implantable RFID in human has been done quite a while ago
Truth: implantable RFID does not contain any personal info
Truth: implantable RFID is available for your pets
Truth: implantable RFID only works if you have right scanner for it
Truth: It is not equipped with GPS
Truth: It is not for surveillance or tracking purpose
Truth: It is not related to Obamacare
Truth: It is not implanted by government

yep.... just pointed out paranoia and fallacy in your post and logic...
 

kokonut

New Member
exactly. The issue in here isn't whether or not if the technology is shrinking but the matter of practicality and feasibility.

But it is being done and refined. Even the invention of the phone people that it wasn't a practical or feasible technology. It may not seem "practical" or "feasible" now but as technology improves and becomes more efficient, that could certainly change in a big way.
 

Steinhauer

Well-Known Member
ah..... It's ironic that you claimed that i attempted to confuse further... :lol:

Truth: Implantable rfid in human has been done quite a while ago
truth: Implantable rfid does not contain any personal info
truth: Implantable rfid is available for your pets
truth: Implantable rfid only works if you have right scanner for it
truth: It is not equipped with gps
truth: It is not for surveillance or tracking purpose
false: It is not related to obamacare
false: It is not implanted by government

yep.... Just pointed out paranoia and fallacy in your post and logic...

fify
 

Steinhauer

Well-Known Member
Computer database but implantable RFID chip is not needed. Show your card with your name and maybe SSN and poof! Your record's retrieved.


derp. any more question? :wave:

how easy is it to lose your wallet? derp.

How easy is it to lose your arm? derp.
 

Jiro

If You Know What I Mean
Premium Member
The size of GPS receivers in 1992 were the size of clipboards, today the size of a deck of cards. Look at digital cameras and how they have "shrunk".
Digital Camera and GPS Receiver are completely different. Digital Camera is a stand-alone product. very simple.

GPS Receiver is not.... which add a much more technological complication. Sounds great on paper and in movie but not so great in reality. I'm sure you've seen in action movies where a spy would attach a GPS tracking device sized as thin as a stamp and as small as quarter square inches.

What you speak of is like this - a tiny spy digital camera inside pinhole with capability to send high-resolution photo or video wirelessly to federal agents miles away. oh and all this kind of surveillance.... warrantless surveillance.

I think Jiro just likes to "hear" himself talk. derp.
derp. derpee derpty doo derp.
 

Jiro

If You Know What I Mean
Premium Member
how easy is it to lose your wallet? derp.

How easy is it to lose your arm? derp.

the US military solved this problem with dog tag necklace and dog tag in the boots behind shoelaces (in case you got blown up and your comrade found your leg somewhere). and writing on your arm with name and stuff (in case your comrade found your arm somewhere). oh and the ATF agents at Waco Siege wrote the blood type on their arms.

Non-Tech FTW. derp.
 

Jiro

If You Know What I Mean
Premium Member
Is it easier to do clerical work with a typewriter, or a computer?
actually a paper form. The computer crashes or power goes out. What to do? paperwork. plus - quite a handful of medical staff is technologically-challenged :)

Is it easier to keep account of your personal cash with a credit/debit card, or cash?
Lot of ADers here do not have plastic card because they can manage their money better :dunno:

To each their own.....

In the event of an emergency, you are rushed to the ER, how easy is it to pull up your medical history? What if it was stored in a microchip?

Which would be more efficient?
It doesn't work like that because there are over thousand of hospitals. Each of them have different service provider, technology, computer system, etc. You might want to watch how they do triage. They did it without RFID/computer/etc. :cool2:

oh and Real Life Example? dogs with implantable RFID. Some shelters cannot read it.

How easy is it to keep track of your personal transactions? How easy is it for someone to steal your identity?
Looking at rising cases of identity theft lately... I guess pretty easy but what does this have to do with implantable RFID and Obamacare?

How hard would it be for them to do this if they had to cut off your arm?
um... why? hack the computer. easier that way.
 

GISJason

New Member
His post #44 response is open ended and doesn't specifically answer my question fully, which is why I asked for clarification. He refused and keeps pointing to #44. Again, Fred Astaire.

It's not gonna happen, they're not going to violate our consitutal rights! If it was going to happen then they'd have given the law a overhaul and made a bunch of revisons to our Laws, as RFID tagging people is a major violation of our privacy and rights.

Certainly American has gone off the very fountain we were raised on and is wavering off and on these moral core values from our previous Presidents but it hasn't got to the point where they're going to willfully violate our rights just to rfid up every citizen of the USA!

But sure it's questionable that this can be done and possiblity may have been done on a handful of suspects behind the scenes, but that kind of action I'd think they'd keep it applied towards high risk targets that Big Brother feels they need to keep tabs on! But hey you never know!

But realistically I don't think it's even stable enough with the handful of issues they're having with it!
 

kokonut

New Member
Truth: implantable RFID in human has been done quite a while ago
Define "quite a while ago." The first self implant experiment was done 12 years ago.

Truth: implantable RFID does not contain any personal info
Define "personal info"
AMA Issues Ethics Code for RFID Chip Implants - RFID Journal

Truth: implantable RFID is available for your pets
A start on the path of acceptance on implantable microchip

Truth: implantable RFID only works if you have right scanner for it
It's based on radio frequency, hence "Radio Frequency ID" but that doesn't preclude it from having a GPS technology imbedded with it for near and remote tracking. A dual purpose chip. Not an impossibility.

Truth: It is not equipped with GPS
GPS continues to shrink in size. It's a matter of time. Right now it's 1/3 the size of a U.S. dime
World's Smallest GPS Chip - Hammerhead II | GPS Lodge - GPSLodge.com

Truth: It is not for surveillance or tracking purpose
GPS is being used for surveillance and/or tracking purposes. RFID is being used for data tracking. Though not on humans (maybe indirectly through a stolen car)
[ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MCp3H_qkj18&feature=player_embedded]YouTube - World's Smallest GPS Tracker - Fits ANYWHERE For Covert GPS Tracking[/ame]
SixthSense RFID-based Surveillance - SixthSense: RFID-based Surveillance

With technology we will see the merging of different technology onto smaller microchips or even nanochips, I wouldn't rule anything out here.
 

kokonut

New Member
It's not gonna happen, they're not going to violate our consitutal rights! If it was going to happen then they'd have given the law a overhaul and made a bunch of revisons to our Laws, as RFID tagging people is a major violation of our privacy and rights.

Certainly American has gone off the very fountain we were raised on and is wavering off and on these moral core values from our previous Presidents but it hasn't got to the point where they're going to willfully violate our rights just to rfid up every citizen of the USA!

But sure it's questionable that this can be done and possiblity may have been done on a handful of suspects behind the scenes, but that kind of action I'd think they'd keep it applied towards high risk targets that Big Brother feels they need to keep tabs on! But hey you never know!

But realistically I don't think it's even stable enough with the handful of issues they're having with it!
I wasn't talking about the healthcare bill.
My question wasn't specific only to the U.S. but anywhere.
Our constitutional rights were already violated with this bill.
RFID tagging in humans, there is no law baring that it cannot or shall not be done. Rather it's the privacy issue is at stake here. Besides, the FDA already approved it for human implantation back in 2004.
FDA Approves RFID Tags For Humans -- RFID -- InformationWeek

You have certain foundation and framework in place that could go in either direction. This is how bills refer to previous bills and the whole thing gets stacked and convoluted. That's the worry. If they can subvert the constitional process on passing a bill in both chambers then anything is possible in the U.S.
 

kokonut

New Member
no not really. You UTILIZE the technology we provide for you but that doesn't mean you understand it intimately. But then since you claim that this is your area as well - then you should know its technological limitation, cost, and practicality. That should give you some idea when will this "Killer Chip" be feasible enough for mass general use.

Technology is a broad field. And, yes, I do understand and intimately know certain technology and its aspects. But I am smart enough not to say on certain technology that it'll never happen. We don't know. Neither do you. The future will hold many surprises for us.

As for limitation on technology, that is a given. You can only go so far as physics allow. There is a limitation but the possibility turns out to be nearly endless. When the "microchip" was invented technological limitation (the know how), cost and practiciality didn't stop researchers from forging ahead. And look where we are now. We're already getting down to the nanochip size already. Small Circuit Opens Big Possibilities - Moore's Law - Gizmodo
Don't let technological limitation, cost and practicality stop you.

I'm pretty involved in certain aspect of technology for quite sometime now. But would it be fair for me to say that I pretty much doubt your claim? I certainly do not go around and claim the ability to read people minds on what they're capable of or what they do or do not know. Behaving like that speaks volume.
 

netrox

New Member
I wasn't talking about the healthcare bill.
My question wasn't specific only to the U.S. but anywhere.
Our constitutional rights were already violated with this bill.
RFID tagging in humans, there is no law baring that it cannot or shall not be done. Rather it's the privacy issue is at stake here. Besides, the FDA already approved it for human implantation back in 2004.

It's a matter of your interpretation. The courts have already said that it's NOT unconstitutional to mandate people to pay for SSA. How is it different from mandating people to pay for healthcare costs?

The majority of Congress, whom we voted, passed the bill. The president whom we voted for signed it. All perfectly within the legal process of the Constitution.
 

jillio

New Member
Leave it to you to not let any opportunity to denigrate Christian beliefs slide by.

It has absolutely nothing to do with denigrating Christian beliefs. Don't be so defensive.

It has to do with the absurdity of likening the VeriChip to the "mark of the beast" or the "Anti-Christ." Those were the statements made in the article referenced.

And, you might want to keep your objection first and foremost in your mind the next time you decide to denigrate any belief that does not comply with your particular brand of Christianity.

Now, back on topic: per the article referenced. Comparison of the VeriChip to the Anti-christ? How can anyone give such an absurdity credibility, especially when used to support a false statement that madatory implantation is provided for in the health care bill.
 
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