Not your typical college freshman

ekjebe

New Member
I've had an account on here for the past two years, but I never used it much. However, my recent diagnoses with Meniere's Disease has led me back to this forum. I've had congenital hearing loss in my right ear since I born, and then I started losing more hearing around the time I started high school. I wear two hearing aids now, and I've never seen it as a disability; it's a part of who I am. I love being HOH. Now I'm a freshman at the University of Illinois and going through quite the life change with Meniere's disease. I always felt kind of isolated because of my hearing loss (kids are mean), but now, with this, I'm feeling pretty lost. Most college kids don't want to think about this kind of thing happening to people their age, and even if they are interested, they just don't get it. Reading the posts on this site has made me feel quite a bit better. I thought it was time I finally posted, so hello :)
 

Bebonang

Active Member
Maybe you can try talking with the counselor at the VRS (Vocational Rehabilatation Services) in your city area.

I had to go to the Seattle Central Community College from New Mexico back in 1973. I went to the VRS and the counselor gave me some help on getting education and dormitory living in Seattle, Washington. The community college had Deaf Education where I can get ASL interpreters and other needed accommodations better than being without the accommodations.

Like Anij, you can try that but you can also try VRS and see what you can get for your needed accommodations for learning education in hearing colleges. Try it and see what you think about that. Good luck.

:welcome: to AllDeaf Forum. Just relax and enjoy reading plus posting here. See you around here. :wave:
 

glickchick

Member
I know how you feel. I'm a student at University of Michigan who went from perfect hearing to total deafness overnight during my soph year. It's been a quite an adjustment. It isn't easy, but it is possible to enjoy college. Would love to connect - sounds like we have a lot in common!

-Lauren

I've had an account on here for the past two years, but I never used it much. However, my recent diagnoses with Meniere's Disease has led me back to this forum. I've had congenital hearing loss in my right ear since I born, and then I started losing more hearing around the time I started high school. I wear two hearing aids now, and I've never seen it as a disability; it's a part of who I am. I love being HOH. Now I'm a freshman at the University of Illinois and going through quite the life change with Meniere's disease. I always felt kind of isolated because of my hearing loss (kids are mean), but now, with this, I'm feeling pretty lost. Most college kids don't want to think about this kind of thing happening to people their age, and even if they are interested, they just don't get it. Reading the posts on this site has made me feel quite a bit better. I thought it was time I finally posted, so hello :)
 

Googoosh

Member
I know how you feel. I'm a student at University of Michigan who went from perfect hearing to total deafness overnight during my soph year. It's been a quite an adjustment. It isn't easy, but it is possible to enjoy college. Would love to connect - sounds like we have a lot in common!

-Lauren

Wow, How did you go deaf overnight? Must be 1 hell of an adjustment. During the early stages of total deafness, How did you manage? Do please tell a bit of your experiences.
Thanks and Cheers :wave:
 

glickchick

Member
To make a long story short, I was in a very bad car accident and it basically severed my auditory nerve. When I woke up, I was completely deaf. Naturally this was quite a shock and a complete 180 from my normal life as a normal college student. It was extremely, extremely hard coming home deaf, unable to communicate and interact with others. Thankfully, my friends got me thru it and I've learned to cope. I communicate basically thru lip reading and writing/reading notes, and am finally starting to learn ASL again (i had started and then stopped). I'm basically voice off since I can't stand speakign without knowing how I sound. Every day is an adjustment, but I am surviving!

Wow, How did you go deaf overnight? Must be 1 hell of an adjustment. During the early stages of total deafness, How did you manage? Do please tell a bit of your experiences.
Thanks and Cheers :wave:
 

respectyoda

Active Member
To make a long story short, I was in a very bad car accident and it basically severed my auditory nerve. When I woke up, I was completely deaf. Naturally this was quite a shock and a complete 180 from my normal life as a normal college student. It was extremely, extremely hard coming home deaf, unable to communicate and interact with others. Thankfully, my friends got me thru it and I've learned to cope. I communicate basically thru lip reading and writing/reading notes, and am finally starting to learn ASL again (i had started and then stopped). I'm basically voice off since I can't stand speakign without knowing how I sound. Every day is an adjustment, but I am surviving!

Wow! That's an uncommon way for a person to become deaf. It is completely understandable that you would have to make major adjustments in life with a sudden hearing loss. At least, you were able to cope with it well. When did you start learning ASL?

I totally understand how you feel about not standing speaking without knowing how you sound because I have been there many times. My mother would tell me to talk while I sign, but I told her I don't like it because I don't know how I sound. It is quite annoying when people say, "Oh, I like it when you talk. You have a nice voice." They are just saying that to make me continue talking. I prefer to use ASL because I am comfortable using a language where I know exactly what I am saying and can be as expressive as I can. Of course, paper and ink [and even technology] will do in lieu of talking when it comes to interacting with hearing people who don't know sign language.
 

Frisky Feline

Well-Known Member
To make a long story short, I was in a very bad car accident and it basically severed my auditory nerve. When I woke up, I was completely deaf. Naturally this was quite a shock and a complete 180 from my normal life as a normal college student. It was extremely, extremely hard coming home deaf, unable to communicate and interact with others. Thankfully, my friends got me thru it and I've learned to cope. I communicate basically thru lip reading and writing/reading notes, and am finally starting to learn ASL again (i had started and then stopped). I'm basically voice off since I can't stand speakign without knowing how I sound. Every day is an adjustment, but I am surviving!

You can find your own thread and put it here if you are not in mood to explain repeatly. I am still impressed that you are doing your best to survive it after you lost your hearing overnight. I was born Deaf that is different situation as yours. Glad you found some true friends who cares about you.
 
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