New to the Deaf world

Sfajack06

New Member
Hello. I am 37 years old. I just became deaf due to a brain tumor, and a disease called NF2. I live in Houston, Texas. I am new to not hearing, and I am having a hard time adjusting to being deaf. I am learning ASL on my own. I want to get involved in the Deaf community. I also want to feel comfortable with doing things on my own and all. I have been sheltered, and have not tried to venture out. People don’t understand, that I am deaf, but I still talk. I would love some advice with my situation please and thank you
 
Welcome to the site. There are great ways to learn ASL independently; such as Bill Vicars channel on YouTube. He is a Deaf ASL professor. However, the best way to learn is submersion. Hopefully fellow site members from Houston will reach out about events in your area. Facebook or other social media is another way to find them.
Asserting yourself and what you need will help retain independence. Tell the person you are "late deafened" so they understand why you can talk while asking them to write or text you back. (Whatever means you prefer really) There are masks online that say something like "I'm Deaf and can't read your lips right now." "I'm deaf, not rude." All kinds. Shirts too, if you wanted to go that route.

I hope this helps.

Take care
 

Sfajack06

New Member
Thank you so much for your help. I really want to get into the Deaf community. I am not sure, if I will be accepted, sine I am late deafened. I want to go get as much practice with others. I feel so alone, because I am not good at reading lips, also I am not fluent in asl. Also people just won’t take time to write things down fir me. After hearing fir 36 years, this is a whole new world, snd a whole new experience for me.
 
Thank you so much for your help. I really want to get into the Deaf community. I am not sure, if I will be accepted, sine I am late deafened. I want to go get as much practice with others. I feel so alone, because I am not good at reading lips, also I am not fluent in asl. Also people just won’t take time to write things down fir me. After hearing fir 36 years, this is a whole new world, snd a whole new experience for me.
The right people will take the time. I've done it and I know I'm not the only one out in the world. This is new and I can only imagine overwhelming. Your feelings are real to you but please don't think you're the only one. Look at the huge community you just joined. I bet there are a million stories of frustrations and funny moments linked to being deaf. Hang in there.

There are groups to practice ASL on here. Join and find your tribe.
 
Hello. I am 37 years old. I just became deaf due to a brain tumor, and a disease called NF2. I live in Houston, Texas. I am new to not hearing, and I am having a hard time adjusting to being deaf. I am learning ASL on my own. I want to get involved in the Deaf community. I also want to feel comfortable with doing things on my own and all. I have been sheltered, and have not tried to venture out. People don’t understand, that I am deaf, but I still talk. I would love some advice with my situation please and thank you
I became profoundly Deaf in 2014 after a head injury. I carry a card with me at all times to advise I am Deaf. Also as I had the same problem with people judging me being Deaf yet verbal, I am now non-verbal Deaf and those I converse with use ASL or written english when talking to me.

I live in Finland and am now 7 years Deaf and living in solitude. Dr Bill Vicars is an excellent point of contact should you wish to learn ASL, as he believes learning to communicate is more important than "making a quick buck" and provides lessons for free at http://asluniversity.com - alternatively you can contact him directly at billvicars@aol.com.

Good luck in your journey through Deafhood

- Rosie Malezer, author.
 

muddy feet

New Member
Firstly, learn to like yourself as confidence is important buy a video camera if your do not have a laptop that can allow you to facetime/whatapp time....all the usual. Being isolated as a deaf person is normal esp-when you have not been brought up in a deaf community with deaf parents or gone to a deaf school. Learn to use S/L in what ever language you want. But remember that just like hearing accents signs are regional as well and can be conflicting. Go on courses via online or in your own local community collage. Research University courses as well. This is a way of embracing your NEW COMMUNITY. And remember being deaf is hard work. As hearing people may think your odd-if they do SO WHAT ?! which is why you need to take what ever they day brings easy....learn from any mistakes. Life brings us all on an uneven/eventful journey....which is why you need a GOOD DOCTOR who will guide and support you. Take notes ABOUT HOW YOUR ARE FEELING-ask questions when you see them BE PROACTIVE....and learn about your health issues. EMBRACE LIFE THEN YOU CAN EMBRACE YOUR INABILITY TO COMMUNICATE THE WAY YOU THINK YOU SHOULD....every one esp in this pandemic is struggling with face masks- when you cannot lip read....when you cannot read faces....just always have a good sense of humour....cry when your unhappy-but move on....being positive that every day changes & you will as well. Because you will find your own kind of group-if you want to. Its staying in that stops you. Move with the flow...and just keep going straight ahead-never looking back.
 

Old Analog

Active Member
Thread here, late onset deafness under Our World Our culture, great reading for people like us, it's nice to see your experience told by others :welcome: :ily:
 

Nita Thomas

Active Member
Thank you so much for your help. I really want to get into the Deaf community. I am not sure, if I will be accepted, sine I am late deafened. I want to go get as much practice with others. I feel so alone, because I am not good at reading lips, also I am not fluent in asl. Also people just won’t take time to write things down fir me. After hearing fir 36 years, this is a whole new world, snd a whole new experience for me.
They will welcome you. Even though you may feel.that you don't need it, I would also recommend seeing a counselor since this is so new to you, they may point you to various groups and services near where you live.
 

Korey Geer

Active Member
W
Hello. I am 37 years old. I just became deaf due to a brain tumor, and a disease called NF2. I live in Houston, Texas. I am new to not hearing, and I am having a hard time adjusting to being deaf. I am learning ASL on my own. I want to get involved in the Deaf community. I also want to feel comfortable with doing things on my own and all. I have been sheltered, and have not tried to venture out. People don’t understand, that I am deaf, but I still talk. I would love some advice with my situation please and thank you
Welcome to alldeaf!

I’m Deaf and able to help answer all your questions.I would not mind meeting up with you later today.please email me at geerkorey@gmail.com if you wish to setup a time to meet. I will be able to get back to you sometime before 3pm
 

Sfajack06

New Member
Firstly, learn to like yourself as confidence is important buy a video camera if your do not have a laptop that can allow you to facetime/whatapp time....all the usual. Being isolated as a deaf person is normal esp-when you have not been brought up in a deaf community with deaf parents or gone to a deaf school. Learn to use S/L in what ever language you want. But remember that just like hearing accents signs are regional as well and can be conflicting. Go on courses via online or in your own local community collage. Research University courses as well. This is a way of embracing your NEW COMMUNITY. And remember being deaf is hard work. As hearing people may think your odd-if they do SO WHAT ?! which is why you need to take what ever they day brings easy....learn from any mistakes. Life brings us all on an uneven/eventful journey....which is why you need a GOOD DOCTOR who will guide and support you. Take notes ABOUT HOW YOUR ARE FEELING-ask questions when you see them BE PROACTIVE....and learn about your health issues. EMBRACE LIFE THEN YOU CAN EMBRACE YOUR INABILITY TO COMMUNICATE THE WAY YOU THINK YOU SHOULD....every one esp in this pandemic is struggling with face masks- when you cannot lip read....when you cannot read faces....just always have a good sense of humour....cry when your unhappy-but move on....being positive that every day changes & you will as well. Because you will find your own kind of group-if you want to. Its staying in that stops you. Move with the flow...and just keep going straight ahead-never looking back.
Thank you. It’s very hard. I just signed up to take asl classes at my community college. I plan on immersing myself into the deaf community. I’m scared they might no pt accept me, but I’d rather be deaf happy, than deaf sad
 

Sfajack06

New Member
They will welcome you. Even though you may feel.that you don't need it, I would also recommend seeing a counselor since this is so new to you, they may point you to various groups and services near where you live.
I’m taking counseling as well. My biggest fear is being rejected by the deaf community. I’m learning basic asl, but I’m planning on taking courses, and immersing my self into the community
 

Sfajack06

New Member
I became profoundly Deaf in 2014 after a head injury. I carry a card with me at all times to advise I am Deaf. Also as I had the same problem with people judging me being Deaf yet verbal, I am now non-verbal Deaf and those I converse with use ASL or written english when talking to me.

I live in Finland and am now 7 years Deaf and living in solitude. Dr Bill Vicars is an excellent point of contact should you wish to learn ASL, as he believes learning to communicate is more important than "making a quick buck" and provides lessons for free at http://asluniversity.com - alternatively you can contact him directly at billvicars@aol.com.

Good luck in your journey through Deafhood

- Rosie Malezer, author.
Thank you for your kind words. This new journey is especially challenging. I’m learning basis asl, snd I vow to be happy. I’ve been living in denial, but I’m ready to embrace my deafness
 
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