Mute and learning ASL

Soulvei

Member
Hi! I've been all over the internet looking for a place where I can connect with other adults who cannot speak. Since there isn't much of a community for mute adults I thought I'd try a deaf forum since we seem to run into similar situations and difficulties.

Is anyone else here mute? I was in an accident that left me unable to speak but I can still use my vocal chords to make noises to express feelings by humming in different tones. I whistle to get people's attention which, until they find out that I cannot speak, sometimes annoys people. I also whistle to control my dogs, one of whom is specially trained to respond to different kinds of whistles for different actions that I need her to perform.

I've also read that a portion of the deaf community does not like mutes because they believe that we are misrepresenting the deaf. I can't understand why this would be an issue but, if you are "against" mutes, please do not contact me about how I *should* be able to speak. I just simply cannot change what has happened.

I look forward to joining in conversations and making new friends :)

--Soul
 

Bottesini

Old Deaf Ranter
Premium Member
Hi! I've been all over the internet looking for a place where I can connect with other adults who cannot speak. Since there isn't much of a community for mute adults I thought I'd try a deaf forum since we seem to run into similar situations and difficulties.

Is anyone else here mute? I was in an accident that left me unable to speak but I can still use my vocal chords to make noises to express feelings by humming in different tones. I whistle to get people's attention which, until they find out that I cannot speak, sometimes annoys people. I also whistle to control my dogs, one of whom is specially trained to respond to different kinds of whistles for different actions that I need her to perform.

I've also read that a portion of the deaf community does not like mutes because they believe that we are misrepresenting the deaf. I can't understand why this would be an issue but, if you are "against" mutes, please do not contact me about how I *should* be able to speak. I just simply cannot change what has happened.

I look forward to joining in conversations and making new friends :)

--Soul
I have a text to speech app on my iPad . I type, it speaks what I say.

It seems that would be even more useful if you can hear what the other person is saying, but it even works great for things like restaurant ordering for me, although I am deaf.
 

Soulvei

Member
I have a text to speech app on my iPad . I type, it speaks what I say.

It seems that would be even more useful if you can hear what the other person is saying, but it even works great for things like restaurant ordering for me, although I am deaf.

Those TTS apps are great! Do you have any specific recommendations of which one you like best? There are lots of them out there... I use an Android device so it has to be through the Play Store.

--Soul
 

Bottesini

Old Deaf Ranter
Premium Member
Those TTS apps are great! Do you have any specific recommendations of which one you like best? There are lots of them out there... I use an Android device so it has to be through the Play Store.

--Soul
No, I don't have an Android based app, sorry.
 

DeafDucky

Well-Known Member
I only know of one- Verbatim. It seems to work well for text to speech I think. I don't know of any other Android apps but looking in Google Play there seems to be a lot of them including Dragon Dictator and Google's text to speech.
 

Soulvei

Member
I only know of one- Verbatim. It seems to work well for text to speech I think. I don't know of any other Android apps but looking in Google Play there seems to be a lot of them including Dragon Dictator and Google's text to speech.

There are a TONNE of them! It's nuts! :eek: But I hadn't checked out Verbatim. I'll definitely give that one a look! Sifting through apps used to be so easy... now they just make me feel really old LOL I just want one that has a sexy British accent. The Google TTS is really... ugh... she sounds so bland. Even a Valley Girl accent would be preferable to that horrid droning sound the female voice makes.
 

DeafDucky

Well-Known Member
I think you can download other 'voices'- I did that for googlemaps as some voices were hard to understand... seems the British female was better than the American (or was that the other way around...I can't tell anymore :hmm: ).

I would have to go back and figure out how I got them as it was a while ago. I don't know if you can pick other sound/voice files for text to speech apps or not though.
 

SilverRoxy

Deaf/ASL user
Premium Member
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Soulvei

Member
I think you can download other 'voices'- I did that for googlemaps as some voices were hard to understand... seems the British female was better than the American (or was that the other way around...I can't tell anymore :hmm: ).

I would have to go back and figure out how I got them as it was a while ago. I don't know if you can pick other sound/voice files for text to speech apps or not though.

I used an app called Acapela TTS Voices to find a nice speaking voice because Verbatim, at least on my version of the Play Store, was a file beaming app. I downloaded a soft British accent and another with an American accent that was a lot less jarring than the one that comes with Google's TTS app. The only downside was that each adult voice was 4 quid :confused: So I spent 8 quid on two voices. I don't mind paying for a more pleasant speaking voice. The odd thing was that it was 12 GBP for the children's voices. I felt like that was kind of... exploiting the market. I know a kid doesn't want to sound old but 12 quid seemed pretty steepo_O especially since you can make the kid's voice sound more adult by messing with the pitch in the TTS app.

--Soul
 

DeafDucky

Well-Known Member
Ouch! really? I think mine were free- don't recall paying anything. That may have changed since it was a while (at least a year as I got my phone in Dec 2014).
 

deafdyke

Well-Known Member
Hi! I've been all over the internet looking for a place where I can connect with other adults who cannot speak. Since there isn't much of a community for mute adults



--Soul
That's b/c most "nonverbal" adults are those who are "euphanism" nonverbal. Meaning they are nonverbal b/c they are at a low functioning level. There are some nonspeaking adults, but those are kind of rare.
 

Soulvei

Member
That's b/c most "nonverbal" adults are those who are "euphanism" nonverbal. Meaning they are nonverbal b/c they are at a low functioning level. There are some nonspeaking adults, but those are kind of rare.
Well that's... really demeaning. Geez, dude, you might as well call me 'dumb', the old word for 'mute'. I am a highly functioning adult who is active in her community, owns a very successful hedgehog breeding business, owns several houses that I rent to others in a market where the average home is valued at $700k (I'm located in SoCal and in a beach community), I read at least 4 novels each month (that is not counting the graphic novels I read because, while they are now considered a respectable form of literature, they take only an hour or two to plow through), I started kidergarten when I was four years old because I was intelligent enough to skip a year of pre-school, I fought against over 2k other girls for my place in 200 admission slots at a prestigious all-girls catholic school and entered with honors... blah blah blah. I'm also a three time college drop out, I hire someone to clean my house because I hate doing it, I have a book-buying addiction (I hit up Barnes and Nobel once a week-- it's pretty bad lol), and I used to steal things because I was mad at the world for my 'disability'. Nobody is perfect. Everyone has a story. Think about that before posting "facts".

--Soulvei, a high functioning mute adult
 

Soulvei

Member
That's b/c most "nonverbal" adults are those who are "euphanism" nonverbal. Meaning they are nonverbal b/c they are at a low functioning level. There are some nonspeaking adults, but those are kind of rare.
Ugh.. I kinda went a little nuts on you there. I see what you're trying to say, you just said it in a way that was inflammatory. When I was researching this condition I found that it is mostly seen as a child's illness. While there are mute adults because of acute or long-standing stress disorders, accidents (in my case), or botched medical procedures, there really *aren't* a lot of us. It's a bit frustrating to feel so alone.

--Soul
 

dogmom

Well-Known Member
:) Soulvei I think I understand what you mean about feeling alone. I do speak but spoke very late<one sign of what was to be learning disabilities; undiagnosed until college> as a child and used gestures at that time instead.

I also enjoy books and am currently reading The Gilded Hour <among others>.

I'm hoh and sign a very small amount.
 

Bottesini

Old Deaf Ranter
Premium Member
Well that's... really demeaning. Geez, dude, you might as well call me 'dumb', the old word for 'mute'. I am a highly functioning adult who is active in her community, owns a very successful hedgehog breeding business, owns several houses that I rent to others in a market where the average home is valued at $700k (I'm located in SoCal and in a beach community), I read at least 4 novels each month (that is not counting the graphic novels I read because, while they are now considered a respectable form of literature, they take only an hour or two to plow through), I started kidergarten when I was four years old because I was intelligent enough to skip a year of pre-school, I fought against over 2k other girls for my place in 200 admission slots at a prestigious all-girls catholic school and entered with honors... blah blah blah. I'm also a three time college drop out, I hire someone to clean my house because I hate doing it, I have a book-buying addiction (I hit up Barnes and Nobel once a week-- it's pretty bad lol), and I used to steal things because I was mad at the world for my 'disability'. Nobody is perfect. Everyone has a story. Think about that before posting "facts".

--Soulvei, a high functioning mute adult
Everyone does have a story, and as you get to know us, you will find most of us have dramatic ones. The poster who upsets you has a syndrome where most of the people who have it are lo functioning non verbal, so she has seen a lot.

I have one grandchild who has apraxia, which is common in deaf families, and she is delayed. DDvdidnt mean anything demeaning, she was just telling you a fact.
 

Jane B.

Well-Known Member
Everyone does have a story, and as you get to know us, you will find most of us have dramatic ones. The poster who upsets you has a syndrome where most of the people who have it are lo functioning non verbal, so she has seen a lot.

I have one grandchild who has apraxia, which is common in deaf families, and she is delayed. DD didnt mean anything demeaning, she was just telling you a fact.

But still it would be nice if DD would ever tell us the source for the pronouncements she makes about different conditions etc. I often wonder why we should consider her an authority on the things she declares as facts.
 
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