Ms. or Mrs follwed by first name still feels weird to me

Jane B.

Well-Known Member
Just saw someone use it on TV and I am wondering about others reacting like I do. It still feels weird to me. If a title like Ms. or Mrs. is used I expect it to be with the last name. I do get the impression that the use with the first name has come out of the far south. Any of you want to discuss this?
 

Jane B.

Well-Known Member
It is as much a comment as a question. I never used to see or hear a title like Miss, Ms. or Mrs. used with just a woman's first name. Now I am seeing it used some on TV and it still feels weird to me. Because if I see (or hear of) one of those titles used I expect it to be followed by the person's last name or both first and last name.
 

peekaboo

Well-Known Member
ohhh i see. Yeah that is kind of weird. its like they want to know if you are married or not. not that it is really any of their business who you are whether married or not.
 

Jane B.

Well-Known Member
I get the impression that it is supposed to be a term of respect rather than just using the first name as would be done for a kid. But I am still not used to it. I am seeing it in captioning a bit more and got to wondering about others reaction around here.
 

LoveBlue

Well-Known Member
The daycare workers where my kids went - 20+ years ago - were addressed/referred to as Miss <first name>.

I have no problem with it, used in the right context.
 

Rio

Patriots Rock!
Premium Member
I know a lady that calls my dog Miss Porkchop lol nothing weird about it. People called me Miss (my first name) sounds like a southern thing to me. Nothing odd or weird about it.
 

femme Fatale

Official AD Nutcracker
It can be respectable, just a little informal. I was called Miss *my name or a funny description* as a kid, I even use it to call something to my daughter’s attention. Even with appropriate formalities, it can be used the wrong way. Look at the context it’s being used.
 

DeafDucky

Well-Known Member
It's pretty much a southern thing. Here where I live when the kids were younger (under 8th grade)- the schools they went that is how they addressed the teachers- at least in the Montessori ones... Miss India, Mr. Steve etc.

When I lived and worked in PA, one of my co-workers was originally from SC I think... she taught her kids to respect adults that way... Miss Kathy or Mr. Jim - I'm sure there were Mrs. ____ but I never heard them say it lol.
 

LoveBlue

Well-Known Member
It's pretty much a southern thing. Here where I live when the kids were younger (under 8th grade)- the schools they went that is how they addressed the teachers- at least in the Montessori ones... Miss India, Mr. Steve etc.

When I lived and worked in PA, one of my co-workers was originally from SC I think... she taught her kids to respect adults that way... Miss Kathy or Mr. Jim - I'm sure there were Mrs. ____ but I never heard them say it lol.
Well, I’m in a border state then because it’s used here. ;)
 
I have always heard Miss Jane, Miss Debbie, Miss Linda, Miss Betty, etc. I live in Georgia, so maybe it is a southern thing. I thought people did this everywhere. Funny!
 

Jane B.

Well-Known Member
And I don't hear it in the part of Southern Illinois where I live. I can think of one person that used it in a Sunday School class I was helping with. Even than I would have been more comfortable just being Jane to the kids.
 

DeafDucky

Well-Known Member
Well, I’m in a border state then because it’s used here. ;)
LOL As a matter of fact now that I think of it... the co-worker (who I miss dearly- haven't seen her in over 20 years since I left that job)... she and her family did live in Delaware- heck of a commute for her though...

And I don't hear it in the part of Southern Illinois where I live. I can think of one person that used it in a Sunday School class I was helping with. Even than I would have been more comfortable just being Jane to the kids.
Well... southern Illinois is still a northern state. I grew up in PA and never heard that type of salutation until I went to work at my first job in PA after college. And as far as I know, all of my friends from the northern part of the US have never heard of it. Hmm I'm going to ask my friend-- they moved all over the country as their mother worked for the government (or military...?? ).
 

Jane B.

Well-Known Member
When Miss is used I expect it to be followed by the las
Well... southern Illinois is still a northern state. I grew up in PA and never heard that type of salutation until I went to work at my first job in PA after college. And as far as I know, all of my friends from the northern part of the US have never heard of it. Hmm I'm going to ask my friend-- they moved all over the country as their mother worked for the government (or military...?? ).
It was way back in the 1950's when a gal that was music supervisor for the 7 small grand schools here (grades 1 thru 8) went to something school connected in Chicago and mentioned getting asked what part of the south she was from! I will never forget that.

Years later the sister of a very close friend was living in Downer's Grove and we went to visit her & her family. My good ear was still very good at that time and I could tell the difference in what people sounded like between here and there.
 

AlleyCat

Well-Known Member
What others are saying is that it can be used in a fun, informal way. I wouldn’t mind it in the least if someone called me Ms. or Miss (and my first name). It might not be appropriate in a professional setting such as a job interview, but if someone wanted to call me informally in about any other setting, okay by me.
 

Lysander

Well-Known Member
It's a black and southern thing. I live in a predominantly black neighborhood and it's incredibly common here. It's a respect for elders thing. I call my neighbor, who is in her 70's, Ms. Gayle. Everyone in my neighborhood calls her that. Even the adults in their 50's and 60's.
 
It's a black and southern thing. I live in a predominantly black neighborhood and it's incredibly common here. It's a respect for elders thing. I call my neighbor, who is in her 70's, Ms. Gayle. Everyone in my neighborhood calls her that. Even the adults in their 50's and 60's.
Hahaha! Well, I am white, and I have heard it my whole life among the whites. So I think it is just a southern thing here in the South. Even though I am married, "Miss" and my first name is used many times here. I think we use it as a term of respect. "Mrs." and our last name can be too formal at times. I suppose this is middle ground. Not too formal, but a way to show respect, especially for our elders. In the doctor and dentist offices, where I have been known for awhile, "Miss" and my first name is usually used by the office personnel. Of course, I am in my 60's. I love it!
 

Jane B.

Well-Known Member
Hahaha! Well, I am white, and I have heard it my whole life among the whites. So I think it is just a southern thing here in the South. Even though I am married, "Miss" and my first name is used many times here. I think we use it as a term of respect. "Mrs." and our last name can be too formal at times. I suppose this is middle ground. Not too formal, but a way to show respect, especially for our elders. In the doctor and dentist offices, where I have been known for awhile, "Miss" and my first name is usually used by the office personnel. Of course, I am in my 60's. I love it!
I have always been in a mostly white area (although I had a black neighbor under me in one apt house and at different times used two different black doctors) and it is very, very rare here.

So, if you are going to use my first name without my last name I am most comfortable if you just use my first name! That is regardless of what age you are; if you can talk call me Jane.
 
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