Meniere's disease

Angelmarlee

New Member
Anyone out there with Meniere's? For the past couple of years I have had a fast progression of vertigo and ringing in my ears to the point where someone has to be looking at me for me to hear them clearly and I don't know how much my hearing loss will progress. If you weren't born deaf or hard of hearing, how long did it take you to pick up on ASL? Or teach family that didn't know? I've noticed a sort of peacefulness about not being able to hear everything. But also frustrating when I have to ask someone to repeat themselves more than twice. ASL will be useful.
 

AlleyCat

Well-Known Member
Welcome!

We do have some here with Meniere's here, but I don't know if any are active here these days.
 

rockin'robin

Well-Known Member
Guessing "how long it takes to learn ASL" is up to the individual...Kids seem to pick it up quicker than adults...some take ASL in schools...My boys did. Patience is the key...hilarious "mistakes" are made too...LOL...It's fun...
 

Tetracyclone

Active Member
Anyone out there with Meniere's? For the past couple of years I have had a fast progression of vertigo and ringing in my ears to the point where someone has to be looking at me for me to hear them clearly and I don't know how much my hearing loss will progress. If you weren't born deaf or hard of hearing, how long did it take you to pick up on ASL? Or teach family that didn't know? I've noticed a sort of peacefulness about not being able to hear everything. But also frustrating when I have to ask someone to repeat themselves more than twice. ASL will be useful.
Like all languages people learn at different paces and some people have greater gift for language, but ASL, I suspect, keys in a different range of brain talent than spoken language, since it is visual rather than oral. Children will always learn quickly. Key communications will be learned quickly because they get repeated often. More complex ideas will take longer but adult family members can focus on finger spelling so they can simply show you the consonants you likely struggle with for the beginnings of words. Teach them to show you s or sh when they say suspect or shenanigan. Some will catch on, some you will no longer communicate with. This is just an "is" of life.
 
Top