Liar!

TXgolfer

Dream Weaver
Premium Member
Two sides to everything....

The Oil Shale Industry

While oil shale has been used as fuel and as a source of oil in small quantities for many years, few countries currently produce oil from oil shale on a significant commercial level. Many countries do not have significant oil shale resources, but in those countries that do have significant oil shale resources, the oil shale industry has not developed because historically, the cost of oil derived from oil shale has been significantly higher than conventional pumped oil. The lack of commercial viability of oil shale-derived oil has in turn inhibited the development of better technologies that might reduce its cost.

Relatively high prices for conventional oil in the 1970s and 1980s stimulated interest and some development of better oil shale technology, but oil prices eventually fell, and major research and development activities largely ceased. More recently, prices for crude oil have again risen to levels that may make oil shale-based oil production commercially viable, and both governments and industry are interested in pursuing the development of oil shale as an
 

deafdrummer

Active Member
That's one theory though not entirely an implausible one but I doubt that the strategy we're doing is to purposely use up oil from other countries first. You see, it may take a decade or two to have all of our domestic oil in place, and completely energy independent. We have more oil available to us on our soil than all of the Middle East.

Why wouldn't you use up their oil if your plans are for world domination? You have to understand that we cannot keep our oil production equipment idled, with nothing to do for the workers, and yet ready to go when foreign oil drops off. We mothball everything by capping the wells. What it looks is, if they run out of oil, then we start to pull ourselves back into the country militarily, build up our domestic oil infrastructure first, and then the elitists can start to kick butt militarily. But NOT while in the vulnerable state of not having access to foreign oil and yet not having full domestic production in place yet before starting to bulldoze countries from the US border outward. We have the most greedy people on the face of the earth, and the complacent nature of society in this country will prevent the people from stepping in and taking the country back before it's too late.

Something you don't know is that we have thousands, thousands of oil wells capped from 20 years-back with sizable reserves left. That is because there were limits to how much of proven reserves could be extracted. Usually, only half, or more or less could be extracted with the older technology. We now have a method being worked out in the US, somewhere in the east where you use a "microwave reactor" to microwave things like tires, plastics from cars, clothes, trash bags, electronics and crack them back into their original petroleum input materials, like methane, hydrogen, natural gas, oil, even diesel in certain situations. This microwave reactor could also be applied to be dropped into a capped well to microwave the kerogen in the rock formations into releasing the oil and microwave the thicker oil to get it to flow better. Even without the microwave, you can probably go back in with workover rigs to update these wells with newer extraction technology.

See, in most of the US, the easy-to-extract light crude onshore is mostly gone (as far as we can tell with only a few possibilities, like the Bakken formation). What we have left is the harder-to-extract stuff that is not ECONOMICALLY viable at present prices with existing technology, and there is a LOT of it. The microwave reactor can be used to make the remaining oil viable, maybe immediately. The other aspect of the ulterior motive for foreign oil is that the light crude in foreign countries is easier to deal with than the remaining heavy/sour crude we have left onshore on a $-per-barrel basis. We would probably not be able to expand as a nation as we have with $5-8 gas made domestically 15 years ago. That would be like $8-12 gas today. This puts quite a crimp in our plans, doesn't it?

I want to leave with one other thing. I lived in south Texas where my Dad was in the oil business, running a business to lay pipelines and keep them repaired and install appropriate equipment inside battery sites to connect, pump, and monitor the pipelines. I remember that time in the fall of '85 when gas prices collapsed. I called Dad from college because I was worried about his business. He said the entire field out there was summarily shut down for no reason. One day, they were producing at full volume, and the next day, completely shut down. They were ordered to go out there and shut the well heads off. Everyone was laid off except for crews preparing to idle the fields. There was not a thing wrong with them, no declines in production showing up in battery meter circle charts up until the day of shut down. Now, some of the fields are back to producing in some manner at full volume. At least I have a friend who works out there, monitoring the readouts and making sure the lines are in good shape or calling repair crews.
 

Jiro

If You Know What I Mean
Premium Member
Two sides to everything....

The Oil Shale Industry

While oil shale has been used as fuel and as a source of oil in small quantities for many years, few countries currently produce oil from oil shale on a significant commercial level. Many countries do not have significant oil shale resources, but in those countries that do have significant oil shale resources, the oil shale industry has not developed because historically, the cost of oil derived from oil shale has been significantly higher than conventional pumped oil. The lack of commercial viability of oil shale-derived oil has in turn inhibited the development of better technologies that might reduce its cost.

Relatively high prices for conventional oil in the 1970s and 1980s stimulated interest and some development of better oil shale technology, but oil prices eventually fell, and major research and development activities largely ceased. More recently, prices for crude oil have again risen to levels that may make oil shale-based oil production commercially viable, and both governments and industry are interested in pursuing the development of oil shale as an

guess what? the gas cost has gone down now... which means the interest in oil shale has diminished.
 

deafdude26

New Member
those bp company ticked me off they dont care about safety ugh.. i dont want to see $4 gas ever again.. new techs are always expensive..im for oil drilling anywhere...
 

Foxrac

Well-Known Member
Premium Member
No more oil drilling until oil companies will agree to have tighten the regulation to prevent the spill from occur and I don't want our government to be into more responsible over oil spill.

The oil spill has done to be damaged for good and I rather to reduce the dependence on oil by seeking alternative fuel, less use oil, etc.
 

somedeafdudefromPNW

Active Member
Really??? Maybe you should come to a family dinner some night. :laugh2: Plenty of interest around here......has been for a while. Plenty of profit to be made.

Eh...

Albertans often pride themselves in tar sands as long as I remembered, but the oil industry didn't really boom until Shell Canada opened up a few wells.

Talking about it at the table doesn't equate to corporate fundings.
 

TXgolfer

Dream Weaver
Premium Member
Eh...

Albertans often pride themselves in tar sands as long as I remembered, but the oil industry didn't really boom until Shell Canada opened up a few wells.

Talking about it at the table doesn't equate to corporate fundings.

My family (not me) is in the biz.......They would doing be some of the funding...lol We (general) hashed this out in a thread months ago......kinda old really. If people don't want to drill that's fine they are welcome to their opinion. But when it come to profit.........
 

Foxrac

Well-Known Member
Premium Member
It isn't good for homeowners who issue a rent to tourists to sleep in vacation homes and condos. :(
Cruel summer for Gulf beach rentals - CNN.com

We had plan to trip to Florida for summer vacation but my relative changed her mind due situation with oil spill and they want go to Panama City Beach. Despite about oil spill, the water in PCB is clean and don't know why.
 

kokonut

New Member
Why wouldn't you use up their oil if your plans are for world domination? You have to understand that we cannot keep our oil production equipment idled, with nothing to do for the workers, and yet ready to go when foreign oil drops off. We mothball everything by capping the wells. What it looks is, if they run out of oil, then we start to pull ourselves back into the country militarily, build up our domestic oil infrastructure first, and then the elitists can start to kick butt militarily. But NOT while in the vulnerable state of not having access to foreign oil and yet not having full domestic production in place yet before starting to bulldoze countries from the US border outward. We have the most greedy people on the face of the earth, and the complacent nature of society in this country will prevent the people from stepping in and taking the country back before it's too late.

Something you don't know is that we have thousands, thousands of oil wells capped from 20 years-back with sizable reserves left. That is because there were limits to how much of proven reserves could be extracted. Usually, only half, or more or less could be extracted with the older technology. We now have a method being worked out in the US, somewhere in the east where you use a "microwave reactor" to microwave things like tires, plastics from cars, clothes, trash bags, electronics and crack them back into their original petroleum input materials, like methane, hydrogen, natural gas, oil, even diesel in certain situations. This microwave reactor could also be applied to be dropped into a capped well to microwave the kerogen in the rock formations into releasing the oil and microwave the thicker oil to get it to flow better. Even without the microwave, you can probably go back in with workover rigs to update these wells with newer extraction technology.

See, in most of the US, the easy-to-extract light crude onshore is mostly gone (as far as we can tell with only a few possibilities, like the Bakken formation). What we have left is the harder-to-extract stuff that is not ECONOMICALLY viable at present prices with existing technology, and there is a LOT of it. The microwave reactor can be used to make the remaining oil viable, maybe immediately. The other aspect of the ulterior motive for foreign oil is that the light crude in foreign countries is easier to deal with than the remaining heavy/sour crude we have left onshore on a $-per-barrel basis. We would probably not be able to expand as a nation as we have with $5-8 gas made domestically 15 years ago. That would be like $8-12 gas today. This puts quite a crimp in our plans, doesn't it?

I want to leave with one other thing. I lived in south Texas where my Dad was in the oil business, running a business to lay pipelines and keep them repaired and install appropriate equipment inside battery sites to connect, pump, and monitor the pipelines. I remember that time in the fall of '85 when gas prices collapsed. I called Dad from college because I was worried about his business. He said the entire field out there was summarily shut down for no reason. One day, they were producing at full volume, and the next day, completely shut down. They were ordered to go out there and shut the well heads off. Everyone was laid off except for crews preparing to idle the fields. There was not a thing wrong with them, no declines in production showing up in battery meter circle charts up until the day of shut down. Now, some of the fields are back to producing in some manner at full volume. At least I have a friend who works out there, monitoring the readouts and making sure the lines are in good shape or calling repair crews.

I simply do not buy that theory on "world domination." Ever since enviornmental grassroots organizations began in 1970s they've been pushing for less domestic oil production through lawsuits and policy changes were we forced to rely more and more on foreign sources of oil.

I understand that conventional oil is a much easier oil to acquire than unconventional oil. There is no crimping of the idea of going totally domestic here. Each year we send some $500 billion dollars overseas for imported oil. If we turn that around and produce more domestic oil then we keep more of our money into circulation here and at the same time help boost our economy and jobs, even if gas prices were at $8 to $12 dollars since it money gets circulated back in. Funnily enough, London is almost $7 a gallon.
 

TXgolfer

Dream Weaver
Premium Member
We were supposed to play Panama City and then Orlando on back-to-back weekends ......we changed them to Gilbert AZ and Tucson Az instead after the immigration bill passed.

Good Call!!!
 
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