Learn to Lip read

supersonic

New Member
I need help learning to Lip read can any one help, I have had a few ideas from my friend Pepsi and some from other mimbers but I am always on the look out for new ideas. Thanks
 

Matilda

Boxing Kangaroo "Jack"
Premium Member
You could enrol in a day or evening class where you will be able to learn in a supportive environment with other hard of hearing/deafened people. Or if you prefer, to be taught on a one-on-one basis. Lip-reading requires practice, practice and more practice, so hopefully you will have a partner there.

There are different mouth formations to learn, and every 'face' is different, dealing in its own way with words.
 

Pepsi

New Member
Premium Member
You could enrol in a day or evening class where you will be able to learn in a supportive environment with other hard of hearing/deafened people. Or if you prefer, to be taught on a one-on-one basis. Lip-reading requires practice, practice and more practice, so hopefully you will have a partner there.

There are different mouth formations to learn, and every 'face' is different, dealing in its own way with words.

I agree it takes alot of pratice(years) to learn this and also for me lip reading is a lot like fingerprints there are no two alike same way when people talk there are no two people that talk the same way.
 

Pepsi

New Member
Premium Member
I got to thinking about this thread today and it reminded me of my grandmother,well she had no teeth and trying to read lips with people with no teeth is damn hard I am a good lip reader but I am not that good. There were times after talking to that woman I felt like I needed to go buy a six pack of beer,Well supersonic I hope you can get the help you need just take one step at a time.
 

VamPyroX

bloody phreak from hell
You could watch television with the sound on normal. Try reading their lips from time to time. A week later, turn down the sound a bit. Another week, turn it down more. Keep going until there's no sound.

As you progress, you will probably eventually drown out the sounds... like a trance. :)
 

Pepsi

New Member
Premium Member
You could watch television with the sound on normal. Try reading their lips from time to time. A week later, turn down the sound a bit. Another week, turn it down more. Keep going until there's no sound.

As you progress, you will probably eventually drown out the sounds... like a trance. :)

:gpost:
 

~SG~

Well-Known Member
Premium Member
Good posting Vampy :thumb:

You could record the news on tv on to tape or dvd and practise watching lip reading, lip movement. Watch it few times so you can learn how to read his or her mouth movements.
 

Bebonang

Active Member
I got to thinking about this thread today and it reminded me of my grandmother,well she had no teeth and trying to read lips with people with no teeth is damn hard I am a good lip reader but I am not that good. There were times after talking to that woman I felt like I needed to go buy a six pack of beer,Well supersonic I hope you can get the help you need just take one step at a time.

:gpost: My husband's mother does not have a false teeth and she (she is hearing) talk without her dental teeth at all. I could not understand what she says and sometimes she will say in her own Ojibwe language. I get lost almost all the conversation what she is saying so I had to ask my husband what she is saying. He helps me understand her. It takes me years to learn lipreading which was very difficult to read lips like that. Vowels with cheek and tongue are hard to make out sometime especially with words that have the same way to speak and Deafies could not hear the sounds of the vowels at all. That is why we Deafies like to use visual sign language like ASL so it is better to understand more clearly than lipreading. If you still want to lipread, then get yourself into a class for lipreading. I have no idea where you can learn to lipread. Only way is to go to the _(Your State)_ Hearing Socieity, where you can ask for assistance in obtaining a course for lipreading on a one to one Speech Therapist and lipreading coach. I don't know except we Deafies go to oral mainstream (both elementary and high schools) school where we were force to learn how to speak with speech therapist and lipread at the same time, I think. It was sooo long ago back in the middle of 1954 to 1966. I may be a good lipreader but not that great for me to lipread someone and I get lost a lot of times when I could not read the lips well. Good luck. :fingersx:
 

loml

New Member
I need help learning to Lip read can any one help, I have had a few ideas from my friend Pepsi and some from other mimbers but I am always on the look out for new ideas. Thanks

supersonic - Learn to cue English. Cueing removes the ambiguity from lip/speech reading. The UK has a Cued Speech association.
 

Bottesini

Old Deaf Ranter
Premium Member
....unless it is Cued English :)

How do you think cued english can be useful to an adult out in public trying to communicate in the real world?

You have never tryed yourself to speechread and communicate while deaf and you don't really know what it is like.

You should just stay in the forums for how you want to control your child's life to spout this philosophy.

It is not useful to an adult on their own.
 

loml

New Member
How do you think cued english can be useful to an adult out in public trying to communicate in the real world?

You have never tryed yourself to speechread and communicate while deaf and you don't really know what it is like.

You should just stay in the forums for how you want to control your child's life to spout this philosophy.

It is not useful to an adult on their own.

Bottesini - Although I am not deaf, I have/do speech read. Do you yourself cue? I suspect not. Unfortunate really, as then this does not permit you and I to have the common ground of cueing experience(s) for this discussion.

If an adult learns to cue, meaning both expressivley and receptively, they will improve their speech/lip reading skills. Believe it or not, it is up to you. :)
 
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shel90

Audist are not welcome
Premium Member
Resources To Develop Speechreading Skills-- from the National Deaf Education Network and Clearinghouse at Gallaudet University

Click on the link (^^) to find a list of resources to help with speechreading. Keep in mind that speechreading is only effective as less than 30% (an estimated guess) of the English language is visable on the lips.

Yea...and I notice that my eyes get so tired after lipreading for a while.

Good luck in learning how to lipread. I learned it during my toddler years. I dont know how I managed to develop a language by lipreading alone cuz I have a bilateral severe-profound hearing loss.
 

Southern

New Member
I am hearing, (LOL it has been so long since i have posted i feel i have to say it so the newbies get used to me!), and i used to lipread in church all the time. My friends would sit accross the church from me and we would talk that way. Almost all the kids could do it. We also fingerspelled in church. We werent allowed to talk of course and NO PASSING NOTES!! LOL. we would fingerspell entire conversations. the talent has left me unfortuately. I dont lipread or fingerspell well anymore. Like with anything if you do it enough you will become proficient with it. And other people are just gifted in that area. I think the help that has been suggested here is great, just do it as much as you can. you can expect though, like shel90 advised, your eyes will get tired!
 
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