Is more speech therapy worth it?

CSign

New Member
Hayden- you know what feels right to you. If speech therapy seems worthwhile to try again in the future, go for it!

If not, that's okay too. Focus on other things that make you feel good and make progress in your life.

Only you can decide what is right for you.
 

Cloggy

New Member
How incredibly narrow-minded. What a shame.

I guess I will be the only Deaf person in the entire world that gets paid incredibly well at my job and yet I'm not required to utter a single word at work. Not just not-required, it's not even needed. I must now go raise my bar and go out and find an even-better paying job than what I already have so I make sure I use written and oral skills because apparently that's the only way to find a job that pays well. Go figure.
Taking a general remark personally... figures..
But she's right of course.. You are wrong. Like it or not.

Laura said
........
The best paying jobs require communication skills, written and oral......
She didn't say there were no good jobs if you don't speak. Nor did she say that when you can speak and hear you always have a good job.

How about this...
Looking at all the companies providing jobs out there... the higher the job is being paid, the smaller the chance that a deaf person will have a job like that...
This could be because of education, or because the job requires hearing or because the employer would rather employ 1 person instead of 1 person + mobilizing ASL interpreter for every meeting..

And if we are going to take it literally:
How many CEO's of multinationals you know are deaf?
How many managers of multinationals you know are deaf?
How many bank managers you know are deaf?
How many astronauts you know are deaf?

Here's the bottom line: (well.. one of them)
2004 - Relative Earnings of Deaf and Hard-of-hearing Individuals. - 2004 - Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education vol. 9 no. 4
Although those hard of hearing appear to reach lower levels of education, with education there is little or no evidence of an earnings lag relative to those without hearing loss.
So... in general, with average jobs, with the same education, there is not much difference..

However:
2011 - Quick snapshot of deaf & hard of hearing people, postsecondary attendance & unemployment. - Gallaudet Research Institute, October 2011
• Family income comparisons for the U.S. population and population of severely to profoundly
deaf or hard-of-hearing individuals.
• Hearing families - 26% earned between $10,000 and $24,999 annually, deaf or hardof-hearing families - 28% earned incomes in the same range.
• Hearing families- 29% earned $50,000 or more, deaf or hard-of-hearing families - 14% had incomes in the same range

And here's another study
2011 - Effect of Postsecondary Education on the Economic Status of Persons Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing - Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education
 
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Hayden

New Member
Thank you for posting those facts. That was very helpful to read through.

I have decided to postpone speech therapy for now and invest that time in becoming proficient in ASL. Once I can communicate effectively via sign language, I'll reevaluate and see whether or not more speech therapy seems necessary.
 

Frisky Feline

Well-Known Member
I see. So you don't actually disagree with what I've written in this thread, you just disagree because it's me. :ty: for clarifying.

First of all, I replied to beclak because i feel her that because i was there. Right, it wasn't about you or disagree with you. Boy it was no fun.
 

CSign

New Member
Wirelessly posted

Aargh!!! I wasn't thanking you. Like I have said many many times before. It is not all about YOU!!!

I know you weren't thanking me. I asked you a very direct, relevant question and you didn't answer. Probably because I didn't actually write anything for you to disagree with. I have never said- nor do I think it's all about me.
 

CSign

New Member
Thank you for posting those facts. That was very helpful to read through.

I have decided to postpone speech therapy for now and invest that time in becoming proficient in ASL. Once I can communicate effectively via sign language, I'll reevaluate and see whether or not more speech therapy seems necessary.

I'm glad you've made a decision you're comfortable with. :)

Are you enrolled in an ASL class?
 

Hayden

New Member
I'm glad you've made a decision you're comfortable with. :)

Are you enrolled in an ASL class?

I will be in one next semester. I have been learning slowly for the past few months online and with my interpreter. I can make myself understood, and I am an excellent finger speller. I love ASL so far. It's SO much easier than speaking.
 

CSign

New Member
I will be in one next semester. I have been learning slowly for the past few months online and with my interpreter. I can make myself understood, and I am an excellent finger speller. I love ASL so far. It's SO much easier than speaking.

That's great! I agree that ASL is a wonderful language. :)
Good luck with your signing! Just keep it up and you'll become proficient before you know it.
 

Hayden

New Member
That's great! I agree that ASL is a wonderful language. :)
Good luck with your signing! Just keep it up and you'll become proficient before you know it.

Thanks! I have learned so much already, and I have been signing along when I speak to practice. It's SO easy. I wish I had learned years ago.
 

naisho

Forum Disorders M.D.,Ph.D
But she's right of course.. You are wrong. Like it or not.
Actually, what is your point?

The topic is regarding spoken vs non-spoken attainment and workforce employment/income.
Independent variable: oral language proficiency
Dependent variable: income level

The articles you link does not examine oral proficiency. Nowhere do they consider the benefit of spoken language in terms of personal income. They are strongly advocating the relationship between educational attainment and income, which you even made a half point of:

This could be because of education

or because the job requires hearing or because the employer would rather employ 1 person instead of 1 person + mobilizing ASL interpreter for every meeting..
This second half of your sentence is completely your own perspective and is not backed up in any of those articles/links at all. Therefore it is your personal conclusion and you have not posted any evidence to support your point.

You posts indicate that you are associating:
Independent variable 1: non-use of oral language
Independent variable 2: use of interpretive assistance
Dependent variable: income level

This is blatant misuse of empirical data. All your articles have been considering is educational attainment and has nothing to do with "employing 1 person instead of 1 person + mobilizing ASL interpreter for every meeting"

- College graduation 12.8% of the hearing population graduated from college whereas 5.1% of the deaf or hard-of-hearing population graduated.
- Post-college education: 9.2% of the hearing population had some post-college education with only 4.8% of the deaf or hard-of-hearing population having any post-college education.


It's fairly known and easy to understand that individuals with disabilities have a harder time with college graduation rates. Be it due to different attributes such as not being able to follow the course, communication issues, no assisted methods (terps, captionist, CART, adequate notetaking), and so on.

The research findings say more likely:
Independent variable: education attainment (does not consider if the person is oral or sign)
Dependent variable: income level
 

rick48

New Member
Actually, what is your point?

The topic is regarding spoken vs non-spoken attainment and workforce employment/income.
Independent variable: oral language proficiency
Dependent variable: income level

The articles you link does not examine oral proficiency. Nowhere do they consider the benefit of spoken language in terms of personal income. They are strongly advocating the relationship between educational attainment and income, which you even made a half point of:




This second half of your sentence is completely your own perspective and is not backed up in any of those articles/links at all. Therefore it is your personal conclusion and you have not posted any evidence to support your point.

You posts indicate that you are associating:
Independent variable 1: non-use of oral language
Independent variable 2: use of interpretive assistance
Dependent variable: income level

This is blatant misuse of empirical data. All your articles have been considering is educational attainment and has nothing to do with "employing 1 person instead of 1 person + mobilizing ASL interpreter for every meeting"

- College graduation 12.8% of the hearing population graduated from college whereas 5.1% of the deaf or hard-of-hearing population graduated.
- Post-college education: 9.2% of the hearing population had some post-college education with only 4.8% of the deaf or hard-of-hearing population having any post-college education.


It's fairly known and easy to understand that individuals with disabilities have a harder time with college graduation rates. Be it due to different attributes such as not being able to follow the course, communication issues, no assisted methods (terps, captionist, CART, adequate notetaking), and so on.

The research findings say more likely:
Independent variable: education attainment (does not consider if the person is oral or sign)
Dependent variable: income level

Actually, what is your point?
 

naisho

Forum Disorders M.D.,Ph.D
The point made was already quoted for you to read.
The research findings say more likely:
Independent variable: education attainment (does not consider if the person is oral or sign)
Dependent variable: income level
Are you able to follow posts adequately or do you just reply to them before reading?
I think your 1900 post count says more about you than my 5800 posts. Most of mine span across all topics on alldeaf.
However, a good ~99% yours have only been about hearing parents related to ci/deafness and their child & argumentative issues. Not to mention how you tailor your AD profile to others here.

So, in retrospect, do you just comment on certain posts?
 

rick48

New Member
The point made was already quoted for you to read.

I think your 1900 post count says more about you than my 5800 posts. Most of mine span across all topics on alldeaf.
However, a good ~99% yours have only been about hearing parents related to ci/deafness and their child & argumentative issues. Not to mention how you tailor your AD profile to others here.

So, in retrospect, do you just comment on certain posts?

I would hope my 1900+ posts say more about me then your 5800+ posts would say about me.

As a matter of fact just earlier today I offered advice to someone who was denied insurance coverage for her ci. That was not a comment. The other day I offered the OP advice on whether to engage in future S&L therapy. That was not a comment. The other week, I offered some travel advice to someone who was planning a visit to Washington DC. That also was not a comment.

Yes, I almost exclusively post in the ci related forums, why is there some little known codicil to the AD charter that requires me to post in other sections?

There are others posters here who tailor their profiles to other people. One person in particular mocks Dr. Phil. Another has a negative comment directed towards those who are oral deaf and countless others have wanted to free former members. Why, are you so concerned, or is it obsessed, with my profile and where I choose to post?

BTW, it was not I who originally referred to myself and others as both "those four" and the "four horsemen". I am just pointing out which end of the horse they really are.
 

deafdyke

Well-Known Member
CSign, worth it to whom? I'm glad I have speech ability, but just wait til your son gets a bit older and is STILL in speech. Speech for little kids can be fun.
But the fact of the matter is that NO amount of speech therapy is going to give your kid perfect speech.
 

CSign

New Member
CSign, worth it to whom? I'm glad I have speech ability, but just wait til your son gets a bit older and is STILL in speech. Speech for little kids can be fun.
But the fact of the matter is that NO amount of speech therapy is going to give your kid perfect speech.

I think my posts have been quite clear. Worth it to the individual...

The school district also tried to "graduate" my son from speech therapy a few years ago, and I've fought for him to continue having it.

He enjoys it, and he benefits from it. I don't need to "wait until my son gets a little bit older". We have open lines of communication and I can read him quite well- much like many other parents who are invested in their children's well being.

You really need to drop this whole "normal" and "perfect" thing. It's enough already. No one is "normal" and no one is "perfect"- and to that end, I don't expect my son to have "perfect" speech, although he does speak quite well. I accept him for exactly who he is, and we are ensuring he gets the support necessary to become a confident, happy, healthy individual.

When the time comes that he doesn't need it, doesn't want it, or wouldn't benefit from speech therapy we will take his cue. He has taken the lead.
 
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