"i'm a little bit deaf"....

There have also been posts throughout AD that suggest to refer to yourself as whatever makes you comfortable whether that be HOH, deaf or 'hearing impaired' or hearing disabled or whatever you want.

Yes there are opinions on what's the 'right' term (no such thing as 'right' or 'wrong' with the exception of language that is MEANT to denigrate, harm or bigoted).

As for me... audiologically (sic...) I am deaf, on paper I am deaf; with 'assistance' I am technically hard of hearing and says so on paper too. But I still refer to myself as deaf because well.. that's what I am...still can't hear for beans in many situations or understand so hard of hearing doesn't really fit...FOR ME.
 
Hello DEAF DUCKY,
Because I could "talk" like Donald Duck, (interesting topic for the Deaf from Birth, community) kids thought it was funny and started calling me Duck, everybody started calling my Duck. I had already been familiar with the word "duck", and after 35 years on construction sites as a Plumber, I had occasion to "hear" that word allot. Construction sites, in general, are the most dangerous places on planet earth, and you better have, ALL your senses with you, at ALL times, and it even works in not so dangerous places,
I see now, that people don't talk about "losing" Their senses of hearing, smell, taste, touch, and sight, which seems to be an "instant" reaction to any of these. You know how you get a wiff of something, and it makes you think back for a sec, or a song that takes you back.
I think the sense of hearing is the most important one, in that, if you can't, instantly know, WHAT a sound is, or Where it's coming from, you are always a "click" off, and in the "hunting" world, or the "personal security" world, that does not work!. so we adjust and say "I am hard of hearing", but I don't need any help.
For me, I knew that I had lost some "hearing" volume, due to the many hours around F-4 Phantom Jets, bombs and rockets, and Grateful Dead speakers, but I did not feel "hearing impaired", only Hearing Adaptive. Not till I lost all my "sense", in my right ear, "IN AN INSTANT", When a load of Granite fell on me, did I think about my hearing ability.
The moment I woke up in the hospital, and realized that I was alive, and could talk and hear and see, I thought back to all the times that I had "dodged a bullet" in my life, literally, and survived.
But now, I am in a Monte Python Movie, "
And Now For Something TOTALY Different", and as always, "How Am i Gonna' Act"?, but if I had a wish, I would give up half my hearing in my left ear, for even a hundredth' of hearing in my right ear.


hooligan.01.jpg I have adopted this Walt Disney Logo from my friends dads sailboat, which flew this Logo during WW11, out on the "50 Meter Line in the North Sea. One cool story of heroes.
I am a "Pirate Duck, and a Hooligan". are there people in the Deaf Community who have this "condition" of only one ear?.
I would like to know, so we can share together, and learn, how to help others with this.




 
Hello DEAF DUCKY,
Because I could "talk" like Donald Duck, (interesting topic for the Deaf from Birth, community) kids thought it was funny and started calling me Duck, everybody started calling my Duck. I had already been familiar with the word "duck", and after 35 years on construction sites as a Plumber, I had occasion to "hear" that word allot. Construction sites, in general, are the most dangerous places on planet earth, and you better have, ALL your senses with you, at ALL times, and it even works in not so dangerous places,
I see now, that people don't talk about "losing" Their senses of hearing, smell, taste, touch, and sight, which seems to be an "instant" reaction to any of these. You know how you get a wiff of something, and it makes you think back for a sec, or a song that takes you back.
I think the sense of hearing is the most important one, in that, if you can't, instantly know, WHAT a sound is, or Where it's coming from, you are always a "click" off, and in the "hunting" world, or the "personal security" world, that does not work!. so we adjust and say "I am hard of hearing", but I don't need any help.
For me, I knew that I had lost some "hearing" volume, due to the many hours around F-4 Phantom Jets, bombs and rockets, and Grateful Dead speakers, but I did not feel "hearing impaired", only Hearing Adaptive. Not till I lost all my "sense", in my right ear, "IN AN INSTANT", When a load of Granite fell on me, did I think about my hearing ability.
The moment I woke up in the hospital, and realized that I was alive, and could talk and hear and see, I thought back to all the times that I had "dodged a bullet" in my life, literally, and survived.
But now, I am in a Monte Python Movie, "
And Now For Something TOTALY Different", and as always, "How Am i Gonna' Act"?, but if I had a wish, I would give up half my hearing in my left ear, for even a hundredth' of hearing in my right ear.


View attachment 29601 I have adopted this Walt Disney Logo from my friends dads sailboat, which flew this Logo during WW11, out on the "50 Meter Line in the North Sea. One cool story of heroes.
I am a "Pirate Duck, and a Hooligan". are there people in the Deaf Community who have this "condition" of only one ear?.
I would like to know, so we can share together, and learn, how to help others with this.




"Sense of Balance" seems to have nothing to do, with anything about "sense", it has everything to do with what's happening in the inner ear. In my case, all the little "hairs" in my right ear went away, instantly, and Vertigo crept into my life. I had already had a bit of tinnitus, but now there was this new feeling, coming from a spot, just above my right ear, where the Granite struck. It is a different "sound" and has a "chirping" quality to it, and it is coming from the exact spot of the TBI. I've been exposed to concussion type incidents in the past, and even been knocked down by an explosion in 1968 that knocked me down, from over two miles away, but I got up from that one, dusted myself off, and scrambled into a bunker, where I "Heard" many more "concussive incidents", and hoped that one of them didn't have my name on it. Again. I'm hear to tell ya,.. that this pails when compared to a TBI, Tinnitus, and vertigo.
Nothing much to be done, except adapt. That is where my experiments with Bone Conduction Head Phones comes in, and a whole new world, within a whole new world, opened up.
Before, I could not differentiate sounds as they came in, all at once, but now I can. I now differentiate, by putting only the sounds that I feel comfortable with, "in my ear", And being connected, "hands free" to my phone. At the same time, I can carry on a conversation with my wife, Talk to a friend on my phone, and listen to my favorite music, all at the same time, and differentiate which "voice" to concentrate on. Now all the "noise" of the world is put in the background and can never distract me.
I was losing "memory" due to being "hearing Impaired", and Alzheimers and Dementia seem to be creeping in, but I'm fighting it, by "wearing" my music and my phone, which keeps me as centered as I can be. (center is a a strange word in my vertigo world). I have a new "kick" in my wobblie, step now that I enjoy, and nobody knows that I'm dancing.
The Great Alan Wats said, "Life is not a journey, we should have danced and sang along the way"
check out "life is not a journey - Alan Watts", on After Skool.

Tango Yankee All

Craig
 

gnuuser

Member
i agree many things cause hearing loss to some degree and age is one of them!
for someone to say they are a little deaf is a definite misnomer.
but not everyone has been taught the difference.
by definition anyone with approximately 85 to 100% hearing loss is usually classified as deaf.
50 to 84 percent severely hearing impaired, 20 to 49 % hard of hearing.
up to 20 percent can be attributed to age loss.
but i suspect primarily with a lot of younger people (without clinical proof) who say little bit deaf is more likely (selective hearing loss as in only hearing what they want)

tinnitus however is damage to the cilia in the inner ear not so much by loud noise but the suddenness of it.
the subsequent pressure wave may hurt the eardrum but the transduction pulse through the bones of the middle ear set off a severe shockwave in the inner ear and that shock wave breaks off a lot of the cilia resulting in tinnitus, and in severe cases permanent hearing loss.
those little fragile bones of the middle ear combined with the size of the eardrum makes for one heck of an amplifier
 
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FlashAid

New Member
i agree many things cause hearing loss to some degree and age is one of them!
for someone to say they are a little deaf is a definite misnomer.
but not everyone has been taught the difference.
by definition anyone with approximately 85 to 100% hearing loss is usually classified as deaf.
50 to 84 percent severely hearing impaired, 20 to 49 % hard of hearing.
up to 20 percent can be attributed to age loss.
but i suspect primarily with a lot of younger people (without clinical proof) who say little bit deaf is more likely (selective hearing loss as in only hearing what they want)

tinnitus however is damage to the cilia in the inner ear not so much by loud noise but the suddenness of it.
the subsequent pressure wave may hurt the eardrum but the transduction pulse through the bones of the middle ear set off a severe shockwave in the inner ear and that shock wave breaks off a lot of the cilia resulting in tinnitus, and in severe cases permanent hearing loss.
those little fragile bones of the middle ear combined with the size of the eardrum makes for one heck of an amplifier
I 100% agree with you, gnuuser.
 

x1heavy

Active Member
I have selective hearing. HA only what I want to hear. The rest of it is let go... he he.

Don't worry about the small stuff like "A little Bit" something or other is always something to go over and belabor as a whole subject in due time. It has no meaning as long two people or more are communicating in any way possible. In my time the state had a least restrictive doctrine (HA... the nerve...) combined with the idea of total communication. Using voice and signs. Well you tell me that some deaf do not have good voices at all and it's way better that they don't use them. As to not upset those who do not know anything about deaf.

When I use mine, hearing people ask me where the hell you from. So that opens up another round of explaining. For example in Jersey they dont say water. But they use "Wadder" so you pick up various regional things as you go around the USA. Its still water in Sign Language. Unless you are in a different part of the USA where then you two have to agree on the sign for water.

There is never a day long enough to engage in converstation over anything with the deaf. And the hearing has it's own set of problems. Sometimes being just a little bit or a lot of bit or plain mule stubborn nothing is quite sufficient.
 
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