I will be gone...

drphil

Active Member
Isn't Torah part of the "Old Testament" which is in the Bible?

Implanted A B Harmony activated Aug/07
 

Dixie

Farting Snowflakes
Premium Member
Yes the first five books are commonly known as 'The Torah', but if I am correct within Jewish communities it is referred to as 'The Talmud'. The literal translation of 'torah' is 'law' and these are known as the books of law which govern everyday life of a Jewish believer.

I have never read the Koran although I am aware of an English translation of the Koran in the iTunes bookstore being available.

So technically, I have read the Bible and the Torah. :giggle: As for the differences, I don't think we can discuss them openly here in case we get into a religious debate but it can be discussed privately off the forum.

The Torah is very straight forward accounts of historical facts according to the Jews and it tells of Jewish family lineage as well as spelling out the statutes, regulations, and laws that every Jew must follow, from dietary restrictions to their private lives and keeping themselves ritually clean. It also gives very specific details of the old temple that was built by Solomon, down to how many utensils there should be and what type of metal they are to be cast from. It's very specific and very detailed with a lot of 'begats'

The new testament is more contemporary and it gives instructions on every day Christian living, from blessing ones food before eating, down to when a married couple should get it on.

Each book has its own writing style, some are narrative form, some are poetic, and some are in letter form.
 

shushugah

New Member
out of curiosity...has anyone ever read all three: the Bible, Torah, and Koran? If someone did that..it would be interesting to hear the differences and stuff like that :P

I've read entire Torah about 3x, and half of this protestant bible and koran. :) it's too complex to compare and contrast. It's like explaining algabraic geometry to an undergraduate student.
 

shushugah

New Member
Yes the first five books are commonly known as 'The Torah', but if I am correct within Jewish communities it is referred to as 'The Talmud'. The literal translation of 'torah' is 'law' and these are known as the books of law which govern everyday life of a Jewish believer.

I have never read the Koran although I am aware of an English translation of the Koran in the iTunes bookstore being available.

So technically, I have read the Bible and the Torah. :giggle: As for the differences, I don't think we can discuss them openly here in case we get into a religious debate but it can be discussed privately off the forum.

The Torah is very straight forward accounts of historical facts according to the Jews and it tells of Jewish family lineage as well as spelling out the statutes, regulations, and laws that every Jew must follow, from dietary restrictions to their private lives and keeping themselves ritually clean. It also gives very specific details of the old temple that was built by Solomon, down to how many utensils there should be and what type of metal they are to be cast from. It's very specific and very detailed with a lot of 'begats'

The new testament is more contemporary and it gives instructions on every day Christian living, from blessing ones food before eating, down to when a married couple should get it on.

Each book has its own writing style, some are narrative form, some are poetic, and some are in letter form.


Most of your information is correct, however you are very wrong in your first paragraph.

Torah is the written tradition, while Talmud is oral tradition passed on orally from generation to generation starting from Moses. Talmud itself would better be described as Law, and it goes in depth into verses of what the Torah says and is much more technical and has lengthy discussions on what ambiguous aspects of the Torah mean.

But I agree with pretty much everything else you said.
 
Top