How do deaf people view mute people?

Blique

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Hello! Hopefully this is alright - my question is based on characters in a story I'm writing (specifically, a webcomic), but I'm also genuinely curious.

I've taken one class of ASL and have researched a bit on deaf culture, but it's hard to find anything about hearing, physically mute people (who I figure would use ASL too). I've read that many deaf people feel differently when comparing people who are deaf, hearing, and anywhere along the spectrum (people with cochlear implants, hearing people with deaf family, etc), so I'm curious about where mute people who know ASL would fit in.

I've heard one person say that, in general, she would like the company of a mute person more than a hard-of-hearing person, because the mute person would more closely share the troubles of trying to communicate with most of the hearing populace, thus fitting in more with the deaf community and culture.

So how would you view a hearing mute person (one who physically can't speak) who knows ASL, as compared with deaf, hard-of-hearing, and hearing persons? I'm very curious.

Thank you for reading! :)
 
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deafdyke

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Mute seems to be an archaic word,and nonverbal tends to be mostly used for playing the Euphanism Game to describe severe and profound mentally disabled/autistic children.......It's fairly rare for someone to have apraxia/complete absense of expressive spoken langauge,especially with children/young people.....St. Rita's does have an Apraxia program
 

Blique

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I've heard debate over the matter, and I used the term "mute" here (though tentatively) because I've observed that's how most people who can't speak like to refer to themselves. If you know any good readings about the term "mute", please share! :) I've heard a few opinions that "nonverbal" is rude since it's highlighting something they can't do. I couldn't find many other euphemisms since, as you said, someone who is unable to verbally speak is fairly rare.

Most of these people that I've seen are psychologically unable to speak, and I don't know how the feelings about "mute" or "nonverbal" or etc. differ with those who are physical unable to speak.
 

Blique

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You mean, Deaf people view hearing with mute people???

Yes, how a deaf person would view a hearing mute person (sorry if I wasn't clear).

I get the impression that they'd be treated as somewhere between a deaf person and a hearing person, but I'm interested in personal opinions about it.
 

whatdidyousay!

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I've heard debate over the matter, and I used the term "mute" here (though tentatively) because I've observed that's how most people who can't speak like to refer to themselves. If you know any good readings about the term "mute", please share! :) I've heard a few opinions that "nonverbal" is rude since it's highlighting something they can't do. I couldn't find many other euphemisms since, as you said, someone who is unable to verbally speak is fairly rare.

Most of these people that I've seen are psychologically unable to speak, and I don't know how the feelings about "mute" or "nonverbal" or etc. differ with those who are physical unable to speak.

I wonder just how true that is about being too "psychologically unable to speak". I took psychology in collage and my collage professor told my class about a patient that 'was not able to speak" he would just sit there and roll his eyes and bob his head all over the place. A new Dr. saw the patient and saw how much meds he was getting and started giving the guy less meds and the guy started to talk and he said " He was not able to talk because he was so drugged up and his eyes where all dried out and hurting him!
This is very common in nursing homes too, just give the people too much drugs and they sleep most of the day. When my mom was in a nursing home one the nurses aide would eat my mom lunch and when mom's tray was brought back to the kitchen it was checked off at mom 'ate ALL her lunch'.
Then my mom would ring her bell and say she was hungry and the nurse said " you can't be hungry you ate ALL your food!" My mom said "no ,she didn't" and the nurse would think my mom was 'nuts' So I would not believe that about people being too "psychologically unable to speak" until you whole the story.
 

caz12

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apart from on tv remote i never use or seen it used in many years..old friend of mine went to deaf school and was one in his class,he was not accepted very well..it obvious if not using voice pretending deaf then got mental problem and that should be sorted out asap...
i did know another guy who had accident and voice gone it was hard on him and his family the wife and kids learned bsl but not sure what value they all got from it.He went deaf club few times but it distressed him
 

Frisky Feline

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I havent experieice with hearing who cant speak yet. I d love to meet people because they would like to learn ASL anyway. :D Of course some of them wanted to learn ASL
 

Grummer

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good question i havent thought of this much but then again, its a completely different area, try comparing apples and oranges...
 

Bottesini

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They are hearing people. With modern technology, nothing like deaf people. They can hear language and learn it on an equal basis with their speaking counterparts.

People with mutism can hear what is spoken to them by anyone and response by using a computer program to speak for them.

The deaf person will have the disadvantage of not being easily able to access what the hearing speaker is communicating.

They are not alike.
 

Mewtilation

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Definitely not alike..... However personally speaking, I'd say I'd treat a mute person just the same as I treat any hearing person or deaf person, with the same respect I desire. I have never met a mute person, but hey anyone who can use ASL and I'm pretty content. :D What can I say, I'm easy to please. :dunno:
 

Steinhauer

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Hello! Hopefully this is alright - my question is based on characters in a story I'm writing (specifically, a webcomic), but I'm also genuinely curious.

I've taken one class of ASL and have researched a bit on deaf culture, but it's hard to find anything about hearing, physically mute people (who I figure would use ASL too). I've read that many deaf people feel differently when comparing people who are deaf, hearing, and anywhere along the spectrum (people with cochlear implants, hearing people with deaf family, etc), so I'm curious about where mute people who know ASL would fit in.

I've heard one person say that, in general, she would like the company of a mute person more than a hard-of-hearing person, because the mute person would more closely share the troubles of trying to communicate with most of the hearing populace, thus fitting in more with the deaf community and culture.

So how would you view a hearing mute person (one who physically can't speak) who knows ASL, as compared with deaf, hard-of-hearing, and hearing persons? I'm very curious.

Thank you for reading! :)


Um, I am pretty sure I would view a hearing mute person with the use of my eyes.


Did I get it right? Was it a trick question?
 

Blique

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Thank you for all your responses! They really helped clear things up. :) Always glad to learn more.

I wonder just how true that is about being too "psychologically unable to speak". I took psychology in collage and my collage professor told my class about a patient that 'was not able to speak" he would just sit there and roll his eyes and bob his head all over the place. A new Dr. saw the patient and saw how much meds he was getting and started giving the guy less meds and the guy started to talk and he said " He was not able to talk because he was so drugged up and his eyes where all dried out and hurting him!
This is very common in nursing homes too, just give the people too much drugs and they sleep most of the day. When my mom was in a nursing home one the nurses aide would eat my mom lunch and when mom's tray was brought back to the kitchen it was checked off at mom 'ate ALL her lunch'.
Then my mom would ring her bell and say she was hungry and the nurse said " you can't be hungry you ate ALL your food!" My mom said "no ,she didn't" and the nurse would think my mom was 'nuts' So I would not believe that about people being too "psychologically unable to speak" until you whole the story.

I was thinking more along the lines of people who are psychologically unable to speak due to social anxiety or trauma, but are otherwise mentally and physically healthy - in other words, they'd be able to communicate fine in their own way (like through ASL).

Thinking about it though, I feel the need to do more thorough research about mutism (or whatever the term may be), as you brought up interesting points and circumstances. I'll look into it!
 

kaio

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i’m wondering the same thing - i am not mute but i am hearing and know bsl. i know of some mute people that use it and it can upset others but i’m not sure why. i think people see it as a choice not to speak and an abuse of sign language but that doesn’t seem fair. some people are simply unable to communicate verbally and choose to use sign language, the most efficient thing made for that purpose. it just makes sense i’m not sure why it upsets people, but if you know of another reason please do educate me i’m not trying to be ignorant
 

Old Analog

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Check time line, this old conversation, but up dating ok, I think of people that stutter so use other communication, teasing bad
 
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