Hi! Music Teacher with sudden hearing loss in one ear - new to this site.

MrsHFQ

New Member
Hi! Music Teacher with sudden hearing loss in one ear, new to this site. I lost all hearing in my left ear literally overnight in October 2020. Being a primary school music teacher this is taking a bit of adjusting to! Having Cros hearing aids fitted in a couple of weeks time and looking at possibility of bone anchored hearing aid further down the line if I'm a suitable candidate. Would love to hear especially from any other teacher as to how they handle noise in the classroom and any tips they might have. Thanks, Hilary
 

malus handle

New Member
Hi, Try This, put a foam ear plug in your good ear , nice and tight, and listen and feel it expand in your ear, takes about 25 seconds. It blocks about 95% of sounds in the mid and lower range. Walk into your class room and see which voices that you can't hear. Now, you can't have ANY hearing in your left ear. ( you lost yours overnight, I lost mine in one second). either way, lost, for now.
With me, the lower male voices and sounds, go away first, then other voices and sounds, like fans and equipment, etc.,
go away, then what is left is the higher range of the female voice and some "higher" male voices. All of a sudden it's quiet, and you can understand the few voices that you can hear, instead of all the chatter. And then go up to them or look at them, and talk to them with your eyes and your hand movements. That was a start for me to gain my confidence back, and since we're 1/2 deaf we might as well learn from ALLDEAF.
After you get a feeling of what its like to be in a relatively sound proof booth, (for short times) with your plug in,
do what I did, and buy a "wireless bone conduction headphones" ( Aftershokz, Air), and pair them up with a Kindle Fire, position the head phone on top of your ear plug, click your Kindle to YouTube and select your favorite old time music, put it in your back pocket, (being hands free is really important to me to feel comfortable ) and as soon as you hit play you will go into another world , especially if you really enjoy "listening" to music. Then take the plug out, and position the "AIR" in front of your right ear canal and play around with being able to "hear" things from any position on your skull. higher tones, but there. When the phone is moved a little bit towards the actual ear, all the bass comes in, it's cool. I only have one ear, and as bad as that is, I actually think that I hear "better" now. I'm so old school, the music that was on my Kindle when I first got the "AIR" was "Dark Side of The Moon, and The Alan Parsons Project". my today music is YIRUMBA Piano music, and A-432 tuned music. just sounds more comfortable. It's interesting to talk to people and still have soft music behind your ear, which you can control the volume to.
I think that tuning and harmonies are the search for perfection, and good on ya for passing these on to kids. the more the better.

Try this out and see if it helps you more focus on voices...and music, that you choose to hear, and let the Tinnitus and noise go much softer.
and oh, I'm sleeping better, when I get up at the same time in the morning no matter what time I went to sleep, and have a Protein shake or some eggs first thing. and stay very hydrated. stress burns more water than you think. get back with me maybe.

Craig
 

Louplum

New Member
Hi, Try This, put a foam ear plug in your good ear , nice and tight, and listen and feel it expand in your ear, takes about 25 seconds. It blocks about 95% of sounds in the mid and lower range. Walk into your class room and see which voices that you can't hear. Now, you can't have ANY hearing in your left ear. ( you lost yours overnight, I lost mine in one second). either way, lost, for now.
With me, the lower male voices and sounds, go away first, then other voices and sounds, like fans and equipment, etc.,
go away, then what is left is the higher range of the female voice and some "higher" male voices. All of a sudden it's quiet, and you can understand the few voices that you can hear, instead of all the chatter. And then go up to them or look at them, and talk to them with your eyes and your hand movements. That was a start for me to gain my confidence back, and since we're 1/2 deaf we might as well learn from ALLDEAF.
After you get a feeling of what its like to be in a relatively sound proof booth, (for short times) with your plug in,
do what I did, and buy a "wireless bone conduction headphones" ( Aftershokz, Air), and pair them up with a Kindle Fire, position the head phone on top of your ear plug, click your Kindle to YouTube and select your favorite old time music, put it in your back pocket, (being hands free is really important to me to feel comfortable ) and as soon as you hit play you will go into another world , especially if you really enjoy "listening" to music. Then take the plug out, and position the "AIR" in front of your right ear canal and play around with being able to "hear" things from any position on your skull. higher tones, but there. When the phone is moved a little bit towards the actual ear, all the bass comes in, it's cool. I only have one ear, and as bad as that is, I actually think that I hear "better" now. I'm so old school, the music that was on my Kindle when I first got the "AIR" was "Dark Side of The Moon, and The Alan Parsons Project". my today music is YIRUMBA Piano music, and A-432 tuned music. just sounds more comfortable. It's interesting to talk to people and still have soft music behind your ear, which you can control the volume to.
I think that tuning and harmonies are the search for perfection, and good on ya for passing these on to kids. the more the better.

Try this out and see if it helps you more focus on voices...and music, that you choose to hear, and let the Tinnitus and noise go much softer.
and oh, I'm sleeping better, when I get up at the same time in the morning no matter what time I went to sleep, and have a Protein shake or some eggs first thing. and stay very hydrated. stress burns more water than you think. get back with me maybe.

Craig
This is fantastic! I'm going to tell my mom about this idea. She has hearing loss and plays in a local orchestra, and she's really sad she can't hear all of the sounds anymore during practice and while she's using the radio in the car. Thanks!!!!
 

malus handle

New Member
This is fantastic! I'm going to tell my mom about this idea. She has hearing loss and plays in a local orchestra, and she's really sad she can't hear all of the sounds anymore during practice and while she's using the radio in the car. Thanks!!!!
Those of us who "lost an ear" overnight, are now confronted with, "all sounds" 2.0, trying to cram themselves into the good ear, all the time, from all directions. Sound Has no "direction" any more. No possible way to interpret all the sounds, so I went back to my music roots, and use that as a good starting point. I put "Equalizer FX" on my Kindle and put on my, "wireless bone conduction headphone" , and listened more intently than I had ever done before. Then I went back and adjusted the equalizer to "mix" the tones to fit my "new" ear, and I was hooked. Music is movement to me, always has been, so I started watching videos and muting the sound, then overlay my music on it. One YouTube video I like is, "The amazing Lazy Bee", and I matched up this music to it. "The Alan Parsons Symphonic Project "Sirius"- "Eye in The Sky" .
If you like "gliding" and "old school " tunes, you will like the easy listening and watching, check it out, remember, Music is Movement, watch the hands of the conductor and of the musicians, and The Lazy Bee seems to be "dancing to the Music".
The Alan Parsons Symphonic Project, did more to try to "heal the wounds" of us old Vietnam Vets, by using tempo, and melody to "comfort us in a desperate time". I was in Vietnam 67', 68', and Woodstock in 69', which was the best
"music therapy" for my 19 year old bones, along with 500,000 soles. 500,000, think about that. Listening to Jimmy Hendrix play the Star Spangled Banner on stage was just "Chill Bumps", even today, at 75.
Weather we can hear clearly or not so much, or not at all, Music is a connection to us all, if we would only take some time to listen privately to it. Another bit of "comfortable" piano music I Like is, Yirumba , "River Flows in You".
I have a friend who's mother is in an Orchestra, and is HOH, and as a kid, he used to always listen to her "Tune" her voice and instrument, even though she couldn't hear. Our Eyes are so much important now, so we can Watch Music, and the tones will be there.

Tell me how you like it and know that your mom will.

Craig
 
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