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hoichi

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Yes I've been in Atlanta and the metro area since I was 5. That's how I was all the way through high school. The only deaf person. What is the best way to learn ASL? Books? Classes? Private tutor? Or online course?

The best way to learn asl, is by a Deaf person.
Books are an aid but only an aid, and wont be able to teach you as a Deaf can. Classes are good,depending on the teacher. Vid online are good too. But lesrning frim Deaf is the best way.
Best thing is to dive in...find someone to sign with, and begin to use the language not just in class or with your sign teacher. But with those important to you and wish tobe a meaningfull part of your life. Keep learning and keep using it..in your life...
And you will pick it up. With every sign you aquire the wall that deafness is, will be breached by the gift of bieng Deaf
 

geoff

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Thanks man. One question. When I have been reading about it one of the grammar rules is to speak backwards like Yoda kind of. For example if I'm going to say she rides the bus. I would sign bus rides she. Is that correct? Or do you sign it like you would say it on English?
 

caz

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It makes me feel like clapped out engine.i never say anything but word not nice when refering to people.but if you not aware you forgiven.I was born hearing and it took me quite a few years after went deaf before I realise I was being insulting i got so pissed off being called impaired in fact it made and makes me feel sick.That was over 30yrs ago times changed.
Geof people on here have had miserable childhoods many forced to think in certain ways physical punishments mental torcher been deprived of educations and jobs they more than capable of doing.Hitler refer to deaf as impaired and had them sterilised this is all within living history.i have not made any comments on it but read threads deaf themselves calling themselves impaired I thought it was American thing and did't have right to comment not being yanki I know I should passed comment but not sure that person would understood she should as she says herself born'impaired'.
Been deaf over thirty years and I still learning.you see why that word used can send shivers through people.Times change Deaf Loud and Proud
 

KerBear

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Thanks man. One question. When I have been reading about it one of the grammar rules is to speak backwards like Yoda kind of. For example if I'm going to say she rides the bus. I would sign bus rides she. Is that correct? Or do you sign it like you would say it on English?

In my experience, the grammar rules for ASL are somewhat "backwards" as compared with spoken English. Note: I'm not saying that I think ASL is a "backwards" or lesser language; I'm merely saying that when compared with spoken English, ASL grammar can seem backwards. Where in spoken English I would say "I'm going there", in ASL I have the option of using either "Me/I-go-there" or "Go-there-me". Both formats are stating the same thing, just in different ways. And from what I've seen, both are correct.

To be clear, I'm not fluent in ASL so others who are more experienced can probably clarify this much better than I can. I completed ASL Level 3 many years ago so am merely basing my comments on what I observed, and what seemed to be true when I was signing with my Deaf friends and patients at that time.

ASL is a beautifully expressive language! I really think it would behoove all people - not just those with hearing loss or d/Deafness - to learn ASL, especially given that statistically more than 60-75% of people will become HOH or deaf at some point in their lives.
 

Reba

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Thanks man. One question. When I have been reading about it one of the grammar rules is to speak backwards like Yoda kind of. For example if I'm going to say she rides the bus. I would sign bus rides she. Is that correct? Or do you sign it like you would say it on English?
:lol: No, the grammar rule isn't speak backwards like Yoda.

If you can get hold of this book:

[ame="http://www.amazon.com/American-Language-Teachers-Resource-Grammar/dp/093032384X/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1442689239&sr=8-2&keywords=green+book+asl"]Teachers Resource ASL Grammar Green Book Series[/ame]


It's an older text book but it explains ASL grammar in depth. I know that it says teacher's resource in the title but I used it as a student when I was taking ASL. (All the Green Book series texts are good.)

As you get deeper into using ASL, the grammar flow will become more natural as it is very logical.
 

Reba

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In my experience, the grammar rules for ASL are somewhat "backwards" as compared with spoken English. Note: I'm not saying that I think ASL is a "backwards" or lesser language; I'm merely saying that when compared with spoken English, ASL grammar can seem backwards. Where in spoken English I would say "I'm going there", in ASL I have the option of using either "Me/I-go-there" or "Go-there-me". Both formats are stating the same thing, just in different ways. And from what I've seen, both are correct….
I wouldn't use the term "backwards" at all when referring to ASL grammar. It's different from English grammar because--wait for it--ASL is not English. To an ASL user, it's English that has convoluted word order.
 

geoff

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It makes me feel like clapped out engine.i never say anything but word not nice when refering to people.but if you not aware you forgiven.I was born hearing and it took me quite a few years after went deaf before I realise I was being insulting i got so pissed off being called impaired in fact it made and makes me feel sick.That was over 30yrs ago times changed.
Geof people on here have had miserable childhoods many forced to think in certain ways physical punishments mental torcher been deprived of educations and jobs they more than capable of doing.Hitler refer to deaf as impaired and had them sterilised this is all within living history.i have not made any comments on it but read threads deaf themselves calling themselves impaired I thought it was American thing and did't have right to comment not being yanki I know I should passed comment but not sure that person would understood she should as she says herself born'impaired'.
Been deaf over thirty years and I still learning.you see why that word used can send shivers through people.Times change Deaf Loud and Proud
I'm not going to say my childhood was miserable but I have been subject to ridicule from bullies growing up and have been denied jobs and have been discriminated against. I was hired for a job once and my supervisor told me to my face if it were up to him he wouldn't have hired me. I've had perfect strangers try to "test" my hearing in public places. Like I said I never have had any involvement with the deaf community. The reason I used the term may of been out of complete ignorance. But when I turn on captioning on my TV it says closed captioning for the hearing impaired. And at the movies and churches it says listening devices for the hearing impaired. That's why I thought the term was accepted.
 

geoff

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:lol: No, the grammar rule isn't speak backwards like Yoda.

If you can get hold of this book:

Teachers Resource ASL Grammar Green Book Series


It's an older text book but it explains ASL grammar in depth. I know that it says teacher's resource in the title but I used it as a student when I was taking ASL. (All the Green Book series texts are good.)

As you get deeper into using ASL, the grammar flow will become more natural as it is very logical.

I will definitely look for that book
And I'm not worried it says teacher addition. My wife is a teacher.
 

dogmom

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what is accepted in the d/Deaf community and what is accepted with or in the hearing community is two different things.

I come at this from a perspective who doesn't fit as "mainstream" and sees from another perspective. I'm hoh and have auditory processing issues <which are related to learning disabilities>. I would not call myself "hearing impaired" nor would I use that term with anyone in the local deaf community where I am.

Remember that "hearing impaired" is a politically correct term which is based on hearing values. Deaf values can be different.
 

Reba

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. . . But when I turn on captioning on my TV it says closed captioning for the hearing impaired. And at the movies and churches it says listening devices for the hearing impaired. That's why I thought the term was accepted.
It's accepted by the hearing community which uses that term in order to be PC (or so they think).

My local TV stations used to voiceover, "Closed Captioning provided for the hearing impaired." Several years ago they got wise and just say, "Closed Captioning provided." Besides, CC aren't just for the deaf and hoh--they are also used in noisy environments (like sports bars) or areas that have to be kept quiet (like hospital waiting rooms) or used by non-English speakers wanting to learn English.

The listening devices used in churches are mostly for older people who are becoming hard of hearing and aren't part of the deaf community. So, they are still hearing people who just can't hear well. They don't care about terminology.
 

MEGATRONICATRON

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Greetings and welcome to AllDeaf.com Forum/Community


I've read through these comments and I can't help but say that some deaf(s) like to use the term, disabled, disability, hearing impaired etc. As, each and everyone is soley different than the other.

So, just because one deaf person will like that term(s), doesn't mean the other/next deaf person will like those term(s). It's your personal preference really.

On the light side, I am profound deaf. No speaking skills. I use ASL to communicate. I though, use my voice because I will use what was given to me, even if I no hear my self! :D

I'm glad you wish to learn ASL. Before paying a lot for it. I suggest searching for websites that offer free ones. With good research, you'll find adequate equal to a paid version. Such a website is LifePrint.com. Also, immerse your self in us. We will gladly skype and teach you. Your best way to immerse your self in the deaf ways.

-meg
 

KerBear

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I wouldn't use the term "backwards" at all when referring to ASL grammar. It's different from English grammar because--wait for it--ASL is not English. To an ASL user, it's English that has convoluted word order.

Reba - That was my point. I actually clearly wrote that when compared with English, ASL seems backwards. I didn't at any point say that ASL IS backwards. (In fact, I specifically clarified that I was NOT saying ASL is backwards.) My use of the word "backwards" was actually in reference to the original poster's comment, because he asked if ASL was backwards.

I'm aware that ASL was never intended to be comparable to spoken English. Unfortunately, in North America, where English is the predominant language, it seems that most people with no ASL experience assume ASL "should" follow spoken English grammatical rules. In my limited experience, most people don't recognize that ASL is, in fact, it's own language, and is a very separate entity from most spoken languages in terms of grammar. For example, when I signed to my former patients, some of the medical staff in the facility where I worked were quite confused that I wasn't signing exactly what they were speaking word for word. I explained that signing word for word is actually "Signed English", not ASL, and is, in my experience, not all that well used by the d/Deaf population. At least, none of the d/Deaf people I knew in the past or know now use signed English.

Of note, many, if not most languages, not just ASL, SEEM backwards when compared grammatically to spoken English. Spanish, French, Italian, and Portuguese are just a few that are comparatively backwards if one is basing their understanding and acquisition of language on the spoken English language.

I wasn't meaning to ruffle any feathers. I apologize if my comments weren't as clearly worded as I intended them to be.
 

geoff

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Reba - That was my point. I actually clearly wrote that when compared with English, ASL seems backwards. I didn't at any point say that ASL IS backwards. (In fact, I specifically clarified that I was NOT saying ASL is backwards.) My use of the word "backwards" was actually in reference to the original poster's comment, because he asked if ASL was backwards.

I'm aware that ASL was never intended to be comparable to spoken English. Unfortunately, in North America, where English is the predominant language, it seems that most people with no ASL experience assume ASL "should" follow spoken English grammatical rules. In my limited experience, most people don't recognize that ASL is, in fact, it's own language, and is a very separate entity from most spoken languages in terms of grammar. For example, when I signed to my former patients, some of the medical staff in the facility where I worked were quite confused that I wasn't signing exactly what they were speaking word for word. I explained that signing word for word is actually "Signed English", not ASL, and is, in my experience, not all that well used by the d/Deaf population. At least, none of the d/Deaf people I knew in the past or know now use signed English.

Of note, many, if not most languages, not just ASL, SEEM backwards when compared grammatically to spoken English. Spanish, French, Italian, and Portuguese are just a few that are comparatively backwards if one is basing their understanding and acquisition of language on the spoken English language.

I wasn't meaning to ruffle any feathers. I apologize if my comments weren't as clearly
worded as I intended them to be.

Phew I seem to have made quite an impression with my intro here
http://viralcircus.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/beadssweat.gif
 

deafdyke

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I wouldn't use the term "backwards" at all when referring to ASL grammar. It's different from English grammar because--wait for it--ASL is not English. To an ASL user, it's English that has convoluted word order.

It's like any other language that has a specific grammar or syntax!
 

deafdyke

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Yes I've been in Atlanta and the metro area since I was 5. That's how I was all the way through high school. The only deaf person. What is the best way to learn ASL? Books? Classes? Private tutor? Or online course?

Classes! See if Atlanta Area School for the Deaf offers ASL classes! http://www.gadoe.org/Curriculum-Instruction-and-Assessment/State-Schools/Pages/default.aspx
I think Atlanta is VERY oral....there is an oral school, called Atlanta Speech School, as well as a hardcore Auditory Verbal Program, the type that doesn't even allow for the possibilty that ASL or Deaf schooling might be helpful...
 
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