going to college as a hoh/little "d" deaf person

SpaceGlitter

New Member
Hi! so I am starting college next fall and I am wondering what accomodations I should take advantage of.

I wear hearing aids and one-on-one or with just a few people I can hear okay as long as my aids are on. In a classroom setting? forget about it. Can't hear anything.

I've been learning ASL for about three years now. First on my own and now taking a class. I can follow what my teacher is saying pretty well but sometimes he goes too fast for me or theres words I don't know. I'm nowhere near fluent but in general I at least understand most of what is being said to me.

I know that if it's available in my school I'm going to request a note-taker. But should I have an interpreter? I don't know if I'm deaf enough to ask for one, would that be taking away from from someone who may need one more? Will the interpreter not want to do it because I'm not totally fluent and I use my voice? It is an art school so a lot of classes will be mostly sitting and drawing still lifes. But some will be lecture-based or at least the teacher will need to explain stuff before we start drawing. I don't know if I should have one.

Can I have one for the lecture classes but not workshops? Should I just stick with a note-taker? Should I wait to request one until my signing is better?
 

deerheart12

Active Member
Hi ! I would check out your college disable resource center and check out what's available. As long as you have an hearing audiogram I'm sure you can have an interpreter and they can adjust to your level. You can have an interpreter for the lecture and they can leave if you're all set for the lab or workshop part.

I'm hard of hearing and I use my voice to speak in class and sometimes I let the interpreter voice me either way.

Try it out! You might learn ASL a bit faster. Good for you taking an ASL class even if you don't understand everything having exposure will help you.
I've taken many classes in lectures, art classes and even swimming classes with an interpreter. I could not survive college without them! I also have used captioning in class which is a person using a court reporter typewriter connected to a laptop and I read what is being said in class. It's usually good in math class setting.

I don't know how accurate it is but you could try out an app on your phone Google Live Transcribe on android phones might help picking up someone's lecture if you're close to the person that is. There are other apps as well but might not be as accurate though.

I always had note takers (these are usually students in your class) in lecture classes which save me from listening and writing at the same time.

Ask the teacher for lecture or slide notes to be emailed to you

Also if you're in a art class and you have an intepreter and the teacher wants you to draw or something you'll have to tell the teacher I can't draw and listen to the interpeter at the same time! lol I had to tell that to one teacher.

Good luck in your studies! :)
Annie
 

SpaceGlitter

New Member
Hi ! I would check out your college disable resource center and check out what's available. As long as you have an hearing audiogram I'm sure you can have an interpreter and they can adjust to your level. You can have an interpreter for the lecture and they can leave if you're all set for the lab or workshop part.

I'm hard of hearing and I use my voice to speak in class and sometimes I let the interpreter voice me either way.

Try it out! You might learn ASL a bit faster. Good for you taking an ASL class even if you don't understand everything having exposure will help you.
I've taken many classes in lectures, art classes and even swimming classes with an interpreter. I could not survive college without them! I also have used captioning in class which is a person using a court reporter typewriter connected to a laptop and I read what is being said in class. It's usually good in math class setting.

I don't know how accurate it is but you could try out an app on your phone Google Live Transcribe on android phones might help picking up someone's lecture if you're close to the person that is. There are other apps as well but might not be as accurate though.

I always had note takers (these are usually students in your class) in lecture classes which save me from listening and writing at the same time.

Ask the teacher for lecture or slide notes to be emailed to you

Also if you're in a art class and you have an intepreter and the teacher wants you to draw or something you'll have to tell the teacher I can't draw and listen to the interpeter at the same time! lol I had to tell that to one teacher.

Good luck in your studies! :)
Annie

thanks this is really helpful!!
 

deafdyke

Well-Known Member
Hi! so I am starting college next fall and I am wondering what accomodations I should take advantage of.

I wear hearing aids and one-on-one or with just a few people I can hear okay as long as my aids are on. In a classroom setting? forget about it. Can't hear anything.

I've been learning ASL for about three years now. First on my own and now taking a class. I can follow what my teacher is saying pretty well but sometimes he goes too fast for me or theres words I don't know. I'm nowhere near fluent but in general I at least understand most of what is being said to me.

I know that if it's available in my school I'm going to request a note-taker. But should I have an interpreter? I don't know if I'm deaf enough to ask for one, would that be taking away from from someone who may need one more? Will the interpreter not want to do it because I'm not totally fluent and I use my voice? It is an art school so a lot of classes will be mostly sitting and drawing still lifes. But some will be lecture-based or at least the teacher will need to explain stuff before we start drawing. I don't know if I should have one.

Can I have one for the lecture classes but not workshops? Should I just stick with a note-taker? Should I wait to request one until my signing is better?
Ask for C-Print instead of a notetaker... Reason I say this is b/c it's much better then a notetaker.....but yes I would trial using a 'terp and see how it goes!
 

ecp

Member
Hi! so I am starting college next fall and I am wondering what accomodations I should take advantage of.

I wear hearing aids and one-on-one or with just a few people I can hear okay as long as my aids are on. In a classroom setting? forget about it. Can't hear anything.

I've been learning ASL for about three years now. First on my own and now taking a class. I can follow what my teacher is saying pretty well but sometimes he goes too fast for me or theres words I don't know. I'm nowhere near fluent but in general I at least understand most of what is being said to me.

I know that if it's available in my school I'm going to request a note-taker. But should I have an interpreter? I don't know if I'm deaf enough to ask for one, would that be taking away from from someone who may need one more? Will the interpreter not want to do it because I'm not totally fluent and I use my voice? It is an art school so a lot of classes will be mostly sitting and drawing still lifes. But some will be lecture-based or at least the teacher will need to explain stuff before we start drawing. I don't know if I should have one.

Can I have one for the lecture classes but not workshops? Should I just stick with a note-taker? Should I wait to request one until my signing is better?
Since you aren’t fluent in ASL yet, CART will likely be much more helpful for you, especially if you take classes with nuisanced vocabulary (advanced anything, any science).
I grew up with ASL/SEE and had interpreters for advanced (graduate level) biochemistry classes. It was very difficult for the interpreters and I because we didn’t know the vocabulary/if there was vocabulary for words in the class. Unfortunately, Deaf students have rarely taken classes in advanced biochem. I found a book and copied pages for the interpreters. That helped a bunch but the poor interpreters probably need wrist surgery after having to fingerspell everything for 2 semesters.
I somehow made it through undergrad while profoundly Deaf without an interpreter (though I taught one of my professors the alphabet so that he could sign the letter he was saying and I could make mental leaps that none of my classmates had to make.
 

VisualistGang

New Member
I would recommend you getting a CART (speech-to-text interpreting) and note takers. With CART, the interpreter would write down what the lecturer is saying in real time and you can see the text on a screen. It's very useful if you're not fluent in sign language yet.

Depending on fluency, a school subject's difficulty level and how much visual (E.g. text, photos) your lecturer is using in power points, you can use a sign language interpreter although you're not a native or hundred percent fluent. People who've learned sign language for ca. 3 years tends to be good enough in it, that they would benefit from a signing interpreter. You can just talk to them and they may adapt their vocabulary a little bit. Usually, you can easily pick up new words through context - so it's not necessary to do much adjustment.

I've no diagnosis other than ASD, therefor I've no right on any services. I've difficulties understanding what my teachers are saying. Especially when they either use a mask or is on Zoom. Sometime it's like listening to foreign languages. So, I depends a lot on the text and pictures in their power points. I also have a few Deaf class mates and therefor we've sign language interpreters in class. I've recently started learning signs and been learning it for a few months. I can understand a lot combining the sign language interpreters, texts on power points and hear a few words my teachers are saying. I can understand some spoken language, but it's very difficult to do it in a class room and when teachers are speaking unclearly. I'm far from fluent in sign language, but there are some words that's easier to comprehend in sign language compared to spoken languages.
 
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