Finland, chilly one day, frozen the next.

I learned 13 years ago when I moved from Australia to Finland that blue skies mean different things in different countries.

In Australia, a blue sky meant it was much warmer outdoors so you could wear less layers and enjoy the sunny breeze or even go for a swim. But here in Finland, if there is snow on the ground and the skies are blue, pack on another 3-4 layers of clothing because everything (right down to your gizzards) will be shivering from cold.

Today is -23 degrees outside and I feel sorry for my car which is outdoors.
 

x1heavy

Active Member
Here in Central Arkansas we are in a form of battle against old man winter I think it's about -1 outside and throw in wind chill down to 15 below. We have another foot or so expected starting sunset tonight (Tues to thurs am) It would not be so bad if we did not already spun two of the tires that we hoped to replace in the spring. They are getting replaced this week already. My 4x4 is staying in her spot. Tires are not good against this storm anyhow. We will remedy that in the spring time.

The coldest I can remember comes from Trucking days, we had a regional storm in south dakotas one night and needed fuel near Bismarck. About 300 gallons worth in a 345 gallon pair of tanks. Well it was -57 at the truck bumper sensor with a wind chill below that. Sustained of 40 with higher gusts. I don't know what the wind chill for that figure works out to but somewhere in the -100 range probably. That poor truck could not get above 150F in coolant temperature and no more than 50 in the cab. The fueling took a hour and 20 minutes off a 50s era pump which required me to take breaks every 15 minutes to warm up. The total bill came to a little bit over 400 gallons all done. Which was what it burned in addition to the 300 needed to support the high idle regime to fight the monster cold and support the heating of fuel and keeping batteries etc going. We had icecream in the reefer trailer and it was heating at -25 to protect the load from frosting over too much. The trailer's 100 gallon tank needed another 80 in addition to the tractor.

To consider that driving down the road to Rapid City, the drivers door on that tractor and passenger doors were warped 4 inches out of their frames. So it required us to bundle up in maximum layers everything and googles for the eyes. at times it snowed inside the stupid cab at 50. What a trip. It would not be the last one...

That episode was the point at which I lost some metabolism physically. It would take years before I could warm up again properly. That particular storm we kept moving. Forecasted from 6 inches that morning to 3 feet with higher drifts and white out conditions which we hit on the eastern Montana Divide. Shrugs.
 

x1heavy

Active Member
I learned 13 years ago when I moved from Australia to Finland that blue skies mean different things in different countries.

In Australia, a blue sky meant it was much warmer outdoors so you could wear less layers and enjoy the sunny breeze or even go for a swim. But here in Finland, if there is snow on the ground and the skies are blue, pack on another 3-4 layers of clothing because everything (right down to your gizzards) will be shivering from cold.

Today is -23 degrees outside and I feel sorry for my car which is outdoors.
We have gone to a semi hot condition on one of the cars. Every few hours she gets cleaned off and run to temp then shut off. We have been doing this since first ice last week and expect to continue until at least Saturday. As we say in the south, we love on it, clean on it and try our best to see it through.
 
I have not been able to drive my car as there is no way to defog the windows or de-ice the glass. Somebody said to try using WD40 on the glass. I did and it would work.... twice. After 2 journeys, I am back to fog and ice. Someone else said use shaving foam on the glass and I did. It worked just once and did not work again. So I will sell my car when the snow goes away.

I have had notes left on my car telling me I am not allowed to drive because I am "Deaf retard" and I chose to respond in person to the writer, telling them if they have a problem that Deaf can drive in Finland, go tell a cop. People are very surdophobic here.

Right now I am wishing the snow and ice would melt away just for a little while so I can drive just one last time. I bought my car because of the pandemic but now we in Finland are most days in lockdown so I never go outside.

Hopefully weather warms up soon. Our non-winter weeks are few in Finland but I really do miss summer today.
 

x1heavy

Active Member
There was a specific time period in the USA where deaf retards (To use another term, deaf mutes or trainables...) which are old words not used today too often because it hurts sensitive PC generation. But specifically if you were deaf you did not drive period. No license no nothing. That lasted I think until about the early 70's and not too long after the DOT issued a rule that HOH Truckers with hearing aids can now drive big rigs. Provided they passed a medical audiogram or a whisper test from 5 feet behind. (In a room with 60 other people talking, aint no way so I use audio gram)

In 40 years Ive only met three truckers who were deaf or HOH in hearing aids and knew specifically of 4 high school class mates who were also deaf but engaged in heavy equiptment, construction and one family in Frederick were tractor dealers for farmers. I used to deliver tractors and combines etc to them now and again. That was pretty special.

I remember the day I got my Class A which was pre CDL in those days in the 80's and allowed to drive anything up to the maximum allowed on our Highways (Around 520,000 to 690,000 or so with special permits etc) There were about a hundred or so in my family who were old fashioned. They were horrified that I am now considered a trucker and licensed to do so by the State and then expressed old fashioned discrimination. I let it go, and they were no longer part of family. It was narrowed down to a few people who were supportive and curious actually as to how am I going to be trucking at that time (Pay phones, no cell, no computers no internet none of that. Just a pencil and ledger pad etc) So discrimination was very strong at that time.

Once in a while I'll run into someone even today who thinks deaf should stay home staring at 4 walls. And it wont take but a hour of a little schooling and teaching as to what it was really in history using myself as a example. When I was 6, the State sent me and my parents to a special doctor who was a mixture of several specialties including mental health. At the time everyone else thought I was deaf mute or actually a retard unable to function. Well that doctor set some toys in a quiet room and then sat to watch what happens, they were new toys at the time and engaging in learning how to work them. Then after about 40 minutes while I was deep in toyland mentally he called my name. Then louder. And louder until he reached my hearing point. I turned to him and said yes?

That was the key and a day to remember. Years later I was told that day would have determined me to go to a deaf school which was new in Maryland or get sent to Springfield hospital to live out my life in a rubber room under very strict rules and very basic existance which itself is not really living classified as a mental retard. That would have been a great loss. We ran into a few who had challenges in life later in the high school and middle school part of the deaf, I remember one in particular. He was borderline crazy. But knew right and wrong and thats what did it as far as him being able to function later in life very well (And with many children hopefully) after graduation.

I don't seek combat or conflict when people display discrimination or ignorance etc. Those are the ones who are set in their ways and if communication is not possible then there is no teaching them. I just let em go. And think back to the bad old days of the 60's where we essentially did not get permission to do anything at all. A land of "No" as it were.

Trucking was something I understood and eventually later in the years was doing very expensive and important cargos (Medicines, narcotics, cancer drugs etc and especially Blood Plasma with my wife. Truck loads of human blood plasma straight from LA California to Avenel NJ in about 52 hours straight through twice a week, 7000 miles a week. When you are doing something that important the money is not the only reward.
 
There was a specific time period in the USA where deaf retards (To use another term, deaf mutes or trainables...) which are old words not used today too often because it hurts sensitive PC generation. But specifically if you were deaf you did not drive period. No license no nothing. That lasted I think until about the early 70's and not too long after the DOT issued a rule that HOH Truckers with hearing aids can now drive big rigs. Provided they passed a medical audiogram or a whisper test from 5 feet behind. (In a room with 60 other people talking, aint no way so I use audio gram)

In 40 years Ive only met three truckers who were deaf or HOH in hearing aids and knew specifically of 4 high school class mates who were also deaf but engaged in heavy equiptment, construction and one family in Frederick were tractor dealers for farmers. I used to deliver tractors and combines etc to them now and again. That was pretty special.

I remember the day I got my Class A which was pre CDL in those days in the 80's and allowed to drive anything up to the maximum allowed on our Highways (Around 520,000 to 690,000 or so with special permits etc) There were about a hundred or so in my family who were old fashioned. They were horrified that I am now considered a trucker and licensed to do so by the State and then expressed old fashioned discrimination. I let it go, and they were no longer part of family. It was narrowed down to a few people who were supportive and curious actually as to how am I going to be trucking at that time (Pay phones, no cell, no computers no internet none of that. Just a pencil and ledger pad etc) So discrimination was very strong at that time.

Once in a while I'll run into someone even today who thinks deaf should stay home staring at 4 walls. And it wont take but a hour of a little schooling and teaching as to what it was really in history using myself as a example. When I was 6, the State sent me and my parents to a special doctor who was a mixture of several specialties including mental health. At the time everyone else thought I was deaf mute or actually a retard unable to function. Well that doctor set some toys in a quiet room and then sat to watch what happens, they were new toys at the time and engaging in learning how to work them. Then after about 40 minutes while I was deep in toyland mentally he called my name. Then louder. And louder until he reached my hearing point. I turned to him and said yes?

That was the key and a day to remember. Years later I was told that day would have determined me to go to a deaf school which was new in Maryland or get sent to Springfield hospital to live out my life in a rubber room under very strict rules and very basic existance which itself is not really living classified as a mental retard. That would have been a great loss. We ran into a few who had challenges in life later in the high school and middle school part of the deaf, I remember one in particular. He was borderline crazy. But knew right and wrong and thats what did it as far as him being able to function later in life very well (And with many children hopefully) after graduation.

I don't seek combat or conflict when people display discrimination or ignorance etc. Those are the ones who are set in their ways and if communication is not possible then there is no teaching them. I just let em go. And think back to the bad old days of the 60's where we essentially did not get permission to do anything at all. A land of "No" as it were.

Trucking was something I understood and eventually later in the years was doing very expensive and important cargos (Medicines, narcotics, cancer drugs etc and especially Blood Plasma with my wife. Truck loads of human blood plasma straight from LA California to Avenel NJ in about 52 hours straight through twice a week, 7000 miles a week. When you are doing something that important the money is not the only reward.
I am an author and publisher and feel a sense of pride with each sale of one of my books. It makes me smile that some are willing to try to understand from reading my books.

Your words gave me a new perspective and were quite empowering. Thank you xx
 

Jane B.

Well-Known Member
I am having a time of it trying to keep track of which of you are using which temp. scale. With locations so scattered I just know some of you are using F like we do here in the US and others are using C.
 
Oh, sorry. Here in Finland we are metric. Celcius here. I dont know what it is in Farenheit.

Outside is -30 degrees (celcius). I slipped over while crossing the road due to a brand new invisible sheet of ice. Should have also worn a balaclava due to the ice crystals whipping at my face like gravel in a hurricane. Good grief, it is COLD !!!! ☠
 

Old Analog

Active Member
-30c=-22f if I did the math correct, you'd think I remember formula, used to keep it handy had to us it often, guess why never committed it to memory, not that I can remember much now:hmm:
 

Jane B.

Well-Known Member
Old Analog that is a good job of coming up with it! I just pulled out a printout that I have kept from years ago and it agrees with you. Regardless of which you use that is COLD!
 

x1heavy

Active Member
I have had to go into Canada. Metric is not hard to come by. For example you are on the queens highway in Ontario coming up on a bridge signed 3.80 meters. Hmmm... at 70 mph thats not the time to be learning metric. 13 feet 6 inches high comes out to right about 4.11 meters. Thats the number that matters.

Along with a bit of french. Nord. Sud etc. Ugh. And german, and a bit of spanish (They laugh so hard... call me arnie... ugh) and lord knows what other words I need in different places in North America.

I can switch between F and C in temperature or any other unit of measure, just did not think on it here in America talking to say Finland. I am sorry if there was trouble either way. It really becomes heavy lifting when engineers break into say... Poundsnewton Force in truck or train engines producing kilowatt of power. Hum.. what is that in American Horse power like we use in our CAT engine? Or torque etc. Just getting some of them to be speaking plain is tough.

ONCE in a great while we have had royal screwups on paper when instructions failed to specify some form of measurement in temperature etc. It can and will lead to some VERY expensive and regretful mistakes that is chargeable to someone when 22200 kilogram of product is ruined. (Or US 49000 pounds of cargo) =)
 
I learned 13 years ago when I moved from Australia to Finland that blue skies mean different things in different countries.

In Australia, a blue sky meant it was much warmer outdoors so you could wear less layers and enjoy the sunny breeze or even go for a swim. But here in Finland, if there is snow on the ground and the skies are blue, pack on another 3-4 layers of clothing because everything (right down to your gizzards) will be shivering from cold.

Today is -23 degrees outside and I feel sorry for my car which is outdoors.
It's so hot around here , never thought I would sweat n March
 
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