Does body heat affect hearing aids, such as sweat?

Mart

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Now we're in the summer season, I love going for long walks, usually in the countryside, my problem is I get hot very easily & sweat quite a bit, I have only the 1 aid & I'm pretty much bald, so sweat runs down the side of my face easily I've tried wearing a baseball cap or any headgear, but find I get even hotter wearing a hat.

I've had the aid for almost 2 years now & still not too sure what happens if it gets really hot, when I get home It feels mildly damp & quite warm, I always give it a good wipe with a moist tissue to keep it clean, anyone know if aids can take heat & would it stop working?.
 

x1heavy

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I have had trouble with the older tube to mold behind the ear hearing aids, I don't use them anymore as of almost 30 years ago. (Im mid 50's) primarily because of the higher maintaince required at the audiologist. Back and forth several times a year. Plus new molds in that time.

I used in ear digital since then. They are self contained in a whole mold. However...

I am a trucker, I have been out in -100 with wind chills and discover that the hearing aids quit working when they get too cold at the battery in about 20 minutes. I have been at 160 Above and they ran fine. Just needed new batteries and a chance to cool down. Too hot to put into ears. We had a cab cooler that usually was about 40 or so. And the ice section about 30 F. Toss them in there for 5 minutes and they have the heat taken out of them. But not so cold as they cannot be used.

One situation I learned not to take them into is cold storage. Some of those places get to be about -70 trailer would be -30 at most. And it will be half a day to move the food or meats from the floor to the pallets to be racked. I take the hearing aids out and put them into a sort of a fabric zipper bag that goes into my pocket where it stays warm. Im usually in T shirt and cutoffs anyway working in that cold having fully adapted.

Another situation is in storm areas. If you are taking a load into a active hurricane, tropical storm or a derechio etc with massive rain, you stick the hearing aids into a waterproof bag before you enter the storm itself. They will stay dry. YOU get soaked. So there is a whole routine to drying out which sometimes is as simple as laying on the roof of trailer in the bright warm sun for 15 minutes.

Used to have them rebuilt every ten years or so at the lab that the company at the time had. Cost me about 500 dollars and new molds were a little extra. They replace everything bad inside of them, usually the very small wires. Wear and tear in trucking is extreme. Weather first followed by trauma abuse etc. you get hit in the head sometimes in either violence against thugs or predators or falling cargo or something else. They hold up pretty well.

The one failure in those hearing aids sometimes is mountain work. You go from say sea level to 3 miles up (13000 or so feet up) in half a hour to a hour and the vents sometimes are not adequate for the pop. Especially if there is a storm front up top. Getting back down can be painful depending on the descent speed. Your body compenstates for a lot, but as long you had fluids to drink and gum to chew it helps the pop and keep your hearing. Sometimes I just take the aids out and wait until we are finished with the mountain work anyway. Too loud most of the time with the roaring Cat engine and thundering jake braking all day or night.
 

EllietheEncourager

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Idk about hearing aids but as a mental health care professional I thought I'd pass a completely unrelated tidbit of information as the temperatures rise.

Anti-psychotics. Past about 85 degrees; they aren't as effective. This happens for a few reasons that snowball into each other. They can make a person run a little warmer anyway, then we start sweating and sweat is out. Also, we tend to increase our fluid intake when it is hot and flush our systems.

My first summer with the agency; I noticed that several of my clients (all med compliant as it is part of my job to help them stay that way) seemed to decompensate all at once. I asked the med provider and she explained all of this to me. Injections that usually work for a month...can start to see push through symptoms within 2 1/2 to 3 weeks. Some get pill forms to PRN during the summer.

No one asked about this but it was a valuable lesson that I try to pass along because it seems little known and I want everyone to be as safe and stable as they can be this summer. With each psychotic break, a person never quite recovers to the place there were previously.

Stay hydrated! Stay well :)
 

deerheart12

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these might help and there are dehumidifier there as well that might help dry it out. Maybe your audiologist might have suggestions too.


 

Mart

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Hey Heavy, thanks for your input, it certainly sounds like you've put a few aids through their paces, as usual always interesting to read your posts.

Hey Ellie, thank you for your post, that's very good advice for everyone, stay safe & well yourself Ellie.:)

Hey Deerheart, thanks for your post, I never realized you could get dehumidifiers for hearing aids, good links, but I'm from the UK, I'm going to check this one out in the UK.
 
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x1heavy

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It is always good to have a device to take the moisture out of them in the night when sleeping etc. A presumption is made that one takes hearing aids out at home when asleep. (In trucking I sometimes did not in high threat areas and slept lightly if at all)

To the other poster regarding medicines and temperatures, I take medicine for several purposes each month and if for whatever reason they run out of supply sometimes they do not get refilled. (Schedule two medicines do not get refills until you have seen a doctor, per Federal DEA Order as of mid 2014. That cuts down on people getting early refills completely. The summer heat or winter cold affects the body in various ways as it deals with medicine or not.

In cold weather I tend to eat a great deal. Food as energy and a means to stay warm while doing heavy labor. In those days going through 10,000 calories and moving 100,000 pounds of freight in 30 hours seperated by driving hundreds of miles was common. Just a expensive food bill with all that eating. I remember some of the roach coaches and street food trucks in various places serving up really good stuff. Just not necessarily what you would consider healthy food. I stayed 150 pounds half my life anyway despite all that. IF I ate like that now well I would be dead from obesity.

Anyway at the end of the day, drying out the hearing aids help them. If you can make it happen. I dont just put hearing aids through the paces, I tend to destroy them. When they get to a quality and able to hold up 10 years with that kind of work and abuse then they were really good hearing aids. Unfortunately that company went out of business. Partly because the very good aids were also very expensive. My last pair was just at 3400 dollars 20 years ago. That would be about 5500 today. Not too many can afford that. My latest pair is stripped down and only 1100 dollars. Nothing fancy. But were the same technology and design as the older ones from trucking and should be my last pair in my lifetime.

One last thought.

In Arkansas some years on my lands even with trees and shade we burn about 6 weeks late summer. Sometimes 130 outside at midday or a little later depending on the weather situation which would be rather bad at times to support that kind of heat. I have learned not to wear hearing aids outside when its the burn season because they heat up too much in the sun. You learn to adapt by not mowing grass or doing any labor in the hot hours. You did that work late at night by moonlight or hired someone to cut the grass while you stayed inside in air conditioning. Come inside from say 116 and 90% humidty and sweating into a house at 68 and 40% give or take... you end up taking the hearing aids out for a brief time. Dry them off and cool them down.

The hottest I have been personally with hearing aids was one night when the AC failed in Spartansburg overnight. It was 100 through the night and the cab inside had reached 160 with me in it. Took 3 gallons of sweet tea over 9 hours that day to recover. The hearing aids needed rebuilding with new molds. Thats was pretty much it for them. That kind of heat was life threatening that day. The AC was replaced later that week.

A local audiologist in Charlotte built the molds for 60 bucks, shipped them to maryland with the old units and they had the lab rebuild everything. I was back later that month to get them. We ignored for that month federal regulations requiring me to be able to hear. We had satellite comms so phone talk was not needed.
 
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malus handle

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It is always good to have a device to take the moisture out of them in the night when sleeping etc. A presumption is made that one takes hearing aids out at home when asleep. (In trucking I sometimes did not in high threat areas and slept lightly if at all)

To the other poster regarding medicines and temperatures, I take medicine for several purposes each month and if for whatever reason they run out of supply sometimes they do not get refilled. (Schedule two medicines do not get refills until you have seen a doctor, per Federal DEA Order as of mid 2014. That cuts down on people getting early refills completely. The summer heat or winter cold affects the body in various ways as it deals with medicine or not.

In cold weather I tend to eat a great deal. Food as energy and a means to stay warm while doing heavy labor. In those days going through 10,000 calories and moving 100,000 pounds of freight in 30 hours seperated by driving hundreds of miles was common. Just a expensive food bill with all that eating. I remember some of the roach coaches and street food trucks in various places serving up really good stuff. Just not necessarily what you would consider healthy food. I stayed 150 pounds half my life anyway despite all that. IF I ate like that now well I would be dead from obesity.

Anyway at the end of the day, drying out the hearing aids help them. If you can make it happen. I dont just put hearing aids through the paces, I tend to destroy them. When they get to a quality and able to hold up 10 years with that kind of work and abuse then they were really good hearing aids. Unfortunately that company went out of business. Partly because the very good aids were also very expensive. My last pair was just at 3400 dollars 20 years ago. That would be about 5500 today. Not too many can afford that. My latest pair is stripped down and only 1100 dollars. Nothing fancy. But were the same technology and design as the older ones from trucking and should be my last pair in my lifetime.

One last thought.

In Arkansas some years on my lands even with trees and shade we burn about 6 weeks late summer. Sometimes 130 outside at midday or a little later depending on the weather situation which would be rather bad at times to support that kind of heat. I have learned not to wear hearing aids outside when its the burn season because they heat up too much in the sun. You learn to adapt by not mowing grass or doing any labor in the hot hours. You did that work late at night by moonlight or hired someone to cut the grass while you stayed inside in air conditioning. Come inside from say 116 and 90% humidty and sweating into a house at 68 and 40% give or take... you end up taking the hearing aids out for a brief time. Dry them off and cool them down.

The hottest I have been personally with hearing aids was one night when the AC failed in Spartansburg overnight. It was 100 through the night and the cab inside had reached 160 with me in it. Took 3 gallons of sweet tea over 9 hours that day to recover. The hearing aids needed rebuilding with new molds. Thats was pretty much it for them. That kind of heat was life threatening that day. The AC was replaced later that week.

A local audiologist in Charlotte built the molds for 60 bucks, shipped them to maryland with the old units and they had the lab rebuild everything. I was back later that month to get them. We ignored for that month federal regulations requiring me to be able to hear. We had satellite comms so phone talk was not needed.
Off subject, but thought I'd ask, Do they make "Hearing" Ade, for people with only one ear?
Not being able to localize sounds, is very hard on the psyche, and all the sounds try to get in all at once, all the time.
 

FunnyFox121

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I have a box that dries out hearing aids in around three hours. I play ice hockey and sweat a ton and my hearing aid gets wet from sweat. I recommend an electric box that dries them out. I also have rechargables, so I can’t just take out batteries. I hope this helps in some way.
 

Barbaro

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I live in Texas. If I work out during the winter season, I can keep my hearing aids on. During the summer, I remove them and put them in small dehumidifier jars. What I use is Hal-Hen Super Dri Aid.
 

Jane B.

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Off subject, but thought I'd ask, Do they make "Hearing" Ade, for people with only one ear?
Not being able to localize sounds, is very hard on the psyche, and all the sounds try to get in all at once, all the time.
I have been deaf in one ear since 1947/48 ( know I was 5 but don't know the calendar year) due to an infection that followed a bad case of measles and the other one developed loss as an adult. I have worn a hearing aid in that second ear since the 1970s. I do not remember what it is to "localize" sounds from both sides.
 

Mart

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I have a box that dries out hearing aids in around three hours. I play ice hockey and sweat a ton and my hearing aid gets wet from sweat. I recommend an electric box that dries them out. I also have rechargables, so I can’t just take out batteries. I hope this helps in some way.

Hey Fox!, might be a dumb question, can you not play without the aids in?, I was just guessing wearing the helmet would greatly reduce the sound & I thought sports like that were more communicating through like hand signals & maybe other gestures.

Correct if I completely wrong ( I have no idea about ice hockey ) :D
 

skulldragon60

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Now we're in the summer season, I love going for long walks, usually in the countryside, my problem is I get hot very easily & sweat quite a bit, I have only the 1 aid & I'm pretty much bald, so sweat runs down the side of my face easily I've tried wearing a baseball cap or any headgear, but find I get even hotter wearing a hat.

I've had the aid for almost 2 years now & still not too sure what happens if it gets really hot, when I get home It feels mildly damp & quite warm, I always give it a good wipe with a moist tissue to keep it clean, anyone know if aids can take heat & would it stop working?.
when getting sweat take out till when you done work out or anything or get haircut number 1 or 2 not bald less sweat light sweat not harmful ... Also I noticed some people put in special dry box I never use that LOL just put countertop keep away from wet area ...
 

malus handle

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It is always good to have a device to take the moisture out of them in the night when sleeping etc. A presumption is made that one takes hearing aids out at home when asleep. (In trucking I sometimes did not in high threat areas and slept lightly if at all)

To the other poster regarding medicines and temperatures, I take medicine for several purposes each month and if for whatever reason they run out of supply sometimes they do not get refilled. (Schedule two medicines do not get refills until you have seen a doctor, per Federal DEA Order as of mid 2014. That cuts down on people getting early refills completely. The summer heat or winter cold affects the body in various ways as it deals with medicine or not.

In cold weather I tend to eat a great deal. Food as energy and a means to stay warm while doing heavy labor. In those days going through 10,000 calories and moving 100,000 pounds of freight in 30 hours seperated by driving hundreds of miles was common. Just a expensive food bill with all that eating. I remember some of the roach coaches and street food trucks in various places serving up really good stuff. Just not necessarily what you would consider healthy food. I stayed 150 pounds half my life anyway despite all that. IF I ate like that now well I would be dead from obesity.

Anyway at the end of the day, drying out the hearing aids help them. If you can make it happen. I dont just put hearing aids through the paces, I tend to destroy them. When they get to a quality and able to hold up 10 years with that kind of work and abuse then they were really good hearing aids. Unfortunately that company went out of business. Partly because the very good aids were also very expensive. My last pair was just at 3400 dollars 20 years ago. That would be about 5500 today. Not too many can afford that. My latest pair is stripped down and only 1100 dollars. Nothing fancy. But were the same technology and design as the older ones from trucking and should be my last pair in my lifetime.

One last thought.

In Arkansas some years on my lands even with trees and shade we burn about 6 weeks late summer. Sometimes 130 outside at midday or a little later depending on the weather situation which would be rather bad at times to support that kind of heat. I have learned not to wear hearing aids outside when its the burn season because they heat up too much in the sun. You learn to adapt by not mowing grass or doing any labor in the hot hours. You did that work late at night by moonlight or hired someone to cut the grass while you stayed inside in air conditioning. Come inside from say 116 and 90% humidty and sweating into a house at 68 and 40% give or take... you end up taking the hearing aids out for a brief time. Dry them off and cool them down.

The hottest I have been personally with hearing aids was one night when the AC failed in Spartansburg overnight. It was 100 through the night and the cab inside had reached 160 with me in it. Took 3 gallons of sweet tea over 9 hours that day to recover. The hearing aids needed rebuilding with new molds. Thats was pretty much it for them. That kind of heat was life threatening that day. The AC was replaced later that week.

A local audiologist in Charlotte built the molds for 60 bucks, shipped them to maryland with the old units and they had the lab rebuild everything. I was back later that month to get them. We ignored for that month federal regulations requiring me to be able to hear. We had satellite comms so phone talk was not needed.
I went SSD in the instant that a load of granite slabs fell off a truck and struck me down. When I woke up in the hospital, the doctors realized that my right ear was completely dead (possible fractured bones in the inner ear), and my only good ear, (which I had some hearing loss in due to being around F4 Phantoms for years, and Grateful Dead speakers off and on) was trying to compensate for all sounds, trying to get in, all at once, making it very difficult at first for my brain to cypher and differentiate sounds, especially words. Over time I adjusted somewhat to this new world, and they tried out a $3,000 "hearing" on me which did absolutely no good. I did not need volume control, I needed volume suppression. Any sudden semi loud sound, made me jump out of my shoes, and so I wore an ear plug to dampen loud sounds, but it curbed my ability to talk to people. I had to make sure that my phone was on me at all times so when it rang i knew exactly where it was. I lived with it for years until one day a friend gave me a pair of, Wireless Bone Conduction Headphones which he paired up to my Samsung phone, and showed me that I could hear words and music (mostly treble) from anywhere on my skull, but as I moved it toward the ear canal the base came in loud and clear. What an advantage that gave me to have nothing blocking my only ear canal, be hands free, and able to adjust the volume to where it was comfortable. I can ware it all day with no discomfort, in any kind of weather or temperature. Also, having a hearing aid in the ear all day, there is moisture build up, which doesn't seem good. I still have to be in front of people to understand and cypher their words though. I've found that I have acquired a much deeper understanding of the music that I listen to, the overtones and harmonies are much more pronounced.
I saw an article ware a deaf person held on to an acoustic guitar while it was being played loud, and she started to move to the tones and the beat almost like she could "hear" it.
I know that hearing impaired, means some sort of digital device in the ear is needed for volume, but a question I have for you is, without your hearing aids in, could you hear things through only "bone conduction"?
I've found that the "Tragus" part of the ear is quite an amplifier when I hold my bonephone on it, and the harder I press on it, the more "fidelity" I get, even with my ear plug in.
Being a trucker, and having to hear what sounds your engine is making, does the digital sound keep you confident?
Any thoughts on bone conduction as a way to supplement your hearing aids? Or is SSD a completely different animal?
Thanks,
Craig :+O)
 

Georgewes

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when wearing hearing aids every few hours take them out and let your ears dry out because we don't know what moisture build up does to our inner ears
 
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