Deaf and music

RoseRodent

Member
I don't know really where this belongs because it's sort of tech and kind of culture and all sorts. I am having an issue with my work. I work in the music business, and it's becoming increasinly apparent that my hearing is a problem. Specifically that it's my hearing that's a problem rather than the deafness! I've got used to a pretty distorted sound in order to be able to hear speech, but it does horrendous things to music. Even with a music program it doesn't make things sound any more normal. I'm in the UK, and the National Health hearing aid service will not spend any time programming for music, and private hearing aids are financially not a possibility.

I find headphones really useless these days, especially since all kinds of European legislation came in for hearing protection and now it's much harder than it used to be to get really loud headphones. I don't have a 'flat' audiogram so if I used regular headphones with some kind of amplification I'm going to need to use some kind of EQ system, and then aren't I going to end up doing just the kinds of funny things my hearing aids already do to the sound?

I'm going to look at using bone conduction, since part of my loss is conductive, but it's hard to get hold of any kit now that most people who use conduction aids have an implant. I'm also looking at trying out custom monitors and maybe some kind of headphone amp to get the volume where I want it, but at the same time I'm wary of doing too much of this without any input from an audiologist simply because I have no way to measure how many dB I am putting into my ears with this kit, and I could be racking up more hearing damage for the future.

How do you listen to music, enjoy music, pitch music so you can participate in it with an instrument where you have to find your own pitch (strings, voice) if you have the kind of hearing that does crazy things to your music? I'm starting to get really down about this.
 

DeafDucky

Well-Known Member
I can't help with the pitch music and instrument part as I don't do that (though I dream of learning the drums still...). But...for listening to music I've moved to using DAI cable/cords-- Direct Audion Input. You'd need an FM boot for the hearing aid and the hearing aid needs to have that function built in or turned on.

One good site to look at is www.connevans.com - It happens to be a UK site though. (I'm from the US- the UK prices are by far cheaper than the US ones I've found).
 

zephren

Well-Known Member
Another option if you have a T-coil is a personal FM loop. The Bellman & Symfon (UK-based company but sell internationally) has a loop that is as part of there personal amplifiers but just the loop alone will plug into any headphone jack. I don't know if it will help with pitch. I can hear the music with this but I can't pick up vocals or specific instruments. Others can pick up this so I think the level of benefit varies by individual.

http://bellman.com/en/our-solutions/personal-amplifiers/
 

RoseRodent

Member
I can't use anything that goes through the hearing aid, because whatever program it's on the distortion and pitch shift is in there. I have half the Connevans catalogue in the house. Next up to try is a bone conduction band with my old body worn radio aid, seeing as I can buy that without a prescription.

Does anyone manage with regular headphones, and how do you put it all together so it's balanced and loud enough? Or did you give up.

Weirdly, when it's pop music rather than classical I don't mind, I just surrender. I actually find that knowing the lyrics wrecks the song, I prefer the "Deaf version" and will sing along exactly as hear it (ooh do la la see ma ma ma, la rala na na ni na Bala rala, lanaaaaaaah...). But classical I need it right or it's really, really wrong.
 

RoseRodent

Member
I'm not sure what to think about those. The real reviews I've seen on consumer sites are much more mixed. Most say they don't fit well, at loud volume they vibrate really hard and it's sore on their face, that they aren't true conductive headphones they're just normal ones worn further forward, and that everyone else in the room can hear them too. The reviews saying how amazing they are mostly seem to beer on the manufacturer site. They're cheap enough, though, so might still give them a try. I meet the audiological criteria for Baha but I don't meet the funding criteria as I don't get ear infections. I'd love to just at least try one on a band, though, see if it is any good for me.

I've quit music once before, didn't play for over 10 years, I'm really trying not to do that again. Tempted, though.
 

zephren

Well-Known Member
Bummer that they don't work as advertised. Kind of defeats the purpose of headphones if it disturbs others around you.
 
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